Water Based Paints
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Water Based Paints

  1. #1
    Senior Member phughes SS-13's Avatar
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    Default Water Based Paints

    This may sound like a joke, but does anyone have some information on these water based Acrylic Automotive paints? When I first saw "water based" I was thinking.... Latex, house paint?? However there are some fantastic colors available and I was just wondering would this be a viable alternative for a boat?

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    Senior Member SuperJet's Avatar
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    I spray it at work. What are you looking to find out?

    RC
    Quote Originally Posted by cordog009 View Post
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    Senior Member phughes SS-13's Avatar
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    Default Should I ??

    Quote Originally Posted by SuperJet View Post
    I spray it at work. What are you looking to find out?

    RC
    I want to paint my Flattie. I have had other boats and they were painted with Imron and the results were very good. However the color selection is thin, now my guy wants to use Awlgrip on this boat. Also a very good product, but now the color selection is getting even thinner. Although I will probably not be involved in the actual spraying of the paint, the safety aspect is also a concern. Without proper precautions the Imron and/or the Awlgrip can kill you. Not Good...
    The Question is: Is the water based Acrylic paint tough enough for use on a Flatbottom? The boat will be used for racing and will spend some time in salt water. Does it chip or scratch easily? And if it is a viable alternative are there any special needs or special prep needed to make it work properly. How about for use on the trailer? Any insite would be greatly appreciated.
    I don't know about the rest of the country but here in Florida I can still get Industrial Imron and the price is very reasonable so if need be that is still an option. The biggest reason I'm asking about this stuff is because of color selection and Safety(my paint guy has the right equipment but it is still a concern). Thanks.

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    Senior Member SuperJet's Avatar
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    Are you talking about a water based single stage? If so ihave never heard of such a thing..... Here in Ca., in my area we are required to spray water based base coat, and your standard solvent based clears.. It requires different spray guns and special dryers to dry the paint before the next coat can be applied.. It is durable and the colors(ESP Metallica)pop much better. As far as the salt water goes, I have no idea.


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    Quote Originally Posted by cordog009 View Post
    Nitrous is like a really hot chick with an STD...you know you wanna hit it, you're just afraid of the consequences

  7. #5
    Raysoncrafter DaveA's Avatar
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    In the automotive refinishing world, traditionally you've had a basecoat (color) and then an acrylic or urethane clear coating applied over it. These base color coats have been reduced or thinned with a petrochemical solvent that evaporates into the atmosphere after allowing the material to be applied to the surface (via spraying usually). These volatile organic compounds (VOC's) have caused the treehuggers fits, so the paint manufacturers developed a type of paint formula that allows water to be the solvent or thinner for the base color coat. Color availability is basically the same, however some application and drying methods differ from 'hot' solvent borne coatings.

    In both cases the colors are covered with an acrylic (1-part, no catalyst or activator) or urethane (2-part, resin+catalyst) clear coating for gloss and durability. So far, this material is still traditionally hot solvent borne, and is cured by both evaporative action and the activation of the catalyst. The 2-part is the stuff that can kill you good- one of the active ingredients is isocyanacrylate- cuz cyanide is poison. Professional painters are equipped for this. Being equipped ain't cheap, BTW. Anyway, I don't know of any waterborne or other low VOC emission clear coat I'd use yet. It's the holy grail of the tree huggers tho, to have all that nasty stuff out of our shops, regardless of how crappy or expensive it might be, but that's another story.

    Imron also has isocyanacrylate in it- that's how it kills you, too. These type of paints, Imron, JetGlo, Alumigrip, etc used on aircraft, and Awlgrip, Pettit, Epiphanes, etc on marine craft (they all have their target markets) are LPU's or linear polyurethanes. They're super tough and great for boats, even tho they have a limited color chart. They are said to exceed automotive base/clear systems in performance/wear/weathering etc. but by how much I don't know- you pays yer money and takes yer chances. There's an awful lot of Krazy Kolors out there on boats like ours that have stood the test of time and use (well, there's trailer queens...but that's another thread).

    In closing, I'm hearing good things about Awlgrip having a new paint that can be buffed out (not easy or even advised on some/most LPU's) and blended to match when repairs are needed (tough or impossible with some/most LPU's again). The other manufacturers may have accomplished the same thing- I don't keep up on LPU's that much since we don't shoot them. I'm just interested in them for future reference.

    Hope this helps, and encourages more discussion on this topic. Any corrections appreciated.
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    Senior Member phughes SS-13's Avatar
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    Default Now I have a Clue

    Thanks to both of you, Dave and SuperJet. With the information provided I think I'll ask my guy to spray the boat with Imron. That stuff is just so damn tough it's hard to argue with the end result even if I can't get that Deep Candy Magenta Pearl Metallic that I so wanted. Thanks for the help.

  9. #7
    Senior Member phughes SS-13's Avatar
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    Imron also has isocyanacrylate in it- that's how it kills you, too. These type of paints, Imron, JetGlo, Alumigrip, etc used on aircraft, and Awlgrip, Pettit, Epiphanes, etc on marine craft (they all have their target markets) are LPU's or linear polyurethanes. They're super tough and great for boats, even tho they have a limited color chart. They are said to exceed automotive base/clear systems in performance/wear/weathering etc. but by how much I don't know- you pays yer money and takes yer chances. There's an awful lot of Krazy Kolors out there on boats like ours that have stood the test of time and use (well, there's trailer queens...but that's another thread).

    In closing, I'm hearing good things about Awlgrip having a new paint that can be buffed out (not easy or even advised on some/most LPU's) and blended to match when repairs are needed (tough or impossible with some/most LPU's again). The other manufacturers may have accomplished the same thing- I don't keep up on LPU's that much since we don't shoot them. I'm just interested in them for future reference.

    Hope this helps, and encourages more discussion on this topic. Any corrections appreciated.[/QUOTE

    Had an opportunity to speak with a retired regional DuPont (Imron) Rep. and he indicated to me that Cyanide poisoning, while a serious concern, is secondary to getting overspray in the lungs. Imron (and I assume other paints of this type) dry very slowly so overspray when inhaled cures in the lungs, never to leave. That paint is so tough that your body is unable to break it down so once it is in the lungs, it is there to stay. He was speaking from experience as he claimed to be under 50% lung function. On a happier note the good people at West Marine tell me that Awlgrip does indeed have a new larger color selection, and someday soon a color chart will be available. Again, thanks for your help.

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