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Not a tow vehicle but...

  1. #1
    ... Some Kind Of Monster's Avatar
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    Default Not a tow vehicle but...

    2006 Chevy Cobalt.. Power stearing light comes on and power stearing goes out while driving the vehicle. I have a feeling this is a known issue. The power stearing on this car is not hydraulic and I am not familiar with it. Does anyone know if there are any common known issues with this car's p/s system?

    As always, thanks!!

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    Senior Member GT Jets's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Some Kind Of Monster View Post
    2006 Chevy Cobalt.. Power stearing light comes on and power stearing goes out while driving the vehicle. I have a feeling this is a known issue. The power stearing on this car is not hydraulic and I am not familiar with it. Does anyone know if there are any common known issues with this car's p/s system?

    As always, thanks!!
    Just being a smartass here, but call your senator, the senate has taken over all service issues on your "American made"car..

    I have a buddy in town who is a GM Guru, I will ask him this afternoon, he may know right off the top of his head if this is an issue that has come up before.

    GT
    GT


    Quote Originally Posted by Quickjet View Post
    Put a 300 on the back of it, Flywheel it and a nosecone. $15,000 later you'll have a 65 mph pile of shit......

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    ... Some Kind Of Monster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GT Jets View Post
    Just being a smartass here, but call your senator, the senate has taken over all service issues on your "American made"car..

    I have a buddy in town who is a GM Guru, I will ask him this afternoon, he may know right off the top of his head if this is an issue that has come up before.

    GT
    I have a feeling that someone that works on this car often would know exactly what needs to be done.

    Its the LT Cobalt by the way.

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    "Try it Now!" Tahiti Boss21's Avatar
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    IMPATIENT ONE, paging IMPATIENT ONE, we need your GM expertise! (not being a smartass)
    1992 Eliminator Daytona 21'

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    Senior Member fleetimus's Avatar
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    PM Impatient1

  8. #6
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    Here is a TSB. Read the codes and let me know.

    INFORMATION
    Bulletin No.: 06-02-32-002C
    Date: April 10, 2008
    Subject:
    Normal Operating Characteristics of Electric Power Steering (EPS) System During Extended Lock-to-Lock Turns (Maximum Steering Wheel Rotation) and/or DTCs C0176 and C0476 Set

    Models:
    2004-2008 Chevrolet Malibu, Malibu Maxx (excluding 2006-2007 SS and 2007 Maxx models)
    2005-2008 Chevrolet Cobalt, Equinox
    2006-2008 Chevrolet HHR
    2005-2008 Pontiac G6 (excluding 2006-2007 GTP, 2006-2008 Convertible and 2007-2008 GT models)
    2005-2006 Pontiac Pursuit (Canada Only)
    2006-2008 Pontiac Torrent
    2007-2008 Pontiac G5
    2002-2008 Saturn VUE
    2003-2007 Saturn ION

    Supercede:
    This bulletin is being updated with the 2008 model year. Please discard Corporate Bulletin Number 06-02-32-002B (Section 02 - Steering).
    The purpose of this bulletin is to inform technicians of normal operating characteristics of the electric power steering system (EPS) when the steering wheel is turned in either direction for an extended period of time.
    When the steering wheel is turned to its maximum rotation the power steering control module (PSCM) will command the maximum amount of current to the EPS motor. If the steering wheel is held in this position for an extended period of time the PSCM will go into overload protection mode to avoid system thermal damage. In this mode the PSCM will limit the amount of current commanded to the EPS motor which reduces steering assist levels.
    If the PSCM detects a high system temperature and the overload protection mode is invoked DTC C0176 "System Thermal Error" may be set. On some models DTC C0476 "Electric Steering Motor Circuit Range/Performance" may also be set. These DTCs indicate normal PSCM action (reduced steering assist) to prevent thermal damage to power steering system components.
    Refer to Power Steering System Description and Operation in SI or the appropriate Service Manual for more information about this and other vehicle-specific information on electric power steering systems.
    For customer inquiries regarding this characteristic please refer to the Steering section under Driving Your Vehicle in the appropriate Owner Manual (reproduced below for reference).
    Owner Manual Information
    If you turn the steering wheel in either direction several times until it stops or hold the steering wheel in the stopped position for an extended amount of time you may notice a reduced amount of power steering assist. The normal amount of power steering assist should return shortly after a few normal steering movements.

    That is the only TSB regarding electric assist I can find so far, my guess is that you have a bad temp sender for the system or that the pcm needs an update to recalibrate the sensitivity of the cutout.

    Or you are terrible at parallel parking and are actually seeing the system work as designed...hah!

    EM
    Last edited by Eliminator Mojave; 09-03-2009 at 08:39 AM. Reason: smack talk

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    More info you might find useful.

    Power Steering System Description and Operation
    The electric power steering (EPS) system reduces the amount of effort needed to steer the vehicle. The system uses the body control module (BCM), power steering control module (PSCM), torque sensor, discrete battery voltage supply circuit, EPS motor, serial data bus, and the instrument panel cluster (IPC) message center to perform the system functions. The PSCM, torque sensor, not the EPS motor are serviced separately from each other or from the steering column. Any EPS components diagnosed to be malfunctioning requires replacement of the steering column assembly, also known as the EPS assembly.

    Torque Sensor
    The PSCM uses a torque sensor as it's main input for determining the amount of steering assist. The steering column has an input shaft, from the steering wheel to the torque sensor, and an output shaft, from the torque sensor to the steering shaft coupler. The input and output shafts are separated by a torsion bar, where the torque sensor is located. The sensor consists of a compensation coil, detecting coil and 3 detecting rings. These detecting rings have toothed edges that face each other. Detecting ring 1 is fixed to the output shaft, detecting rings 2 and 3 are fixed top the input shaft. The detecting coil is positioned around the toothed edges of detecting rings 1 and 2. As torque is applied to the steering column shaft the alignment of the teeth between detecting rings 1 and 2 changes, which causes the detecting coil signal voltage to change. The PSCM recognizes this change in signal voltage as steering column shaft torque. The compensation coil is used to compensate for changes in electrical circuit impedance due to circuit temperature changes from the electrical current and voltage levels as well as ambient temperatures for accurate torque detection.

    EPS Motor
    The EPS motor is a 12 volt brushed DC reversible motor with a 58 amp rating. The motor assists steering through a worm shaft and reduction gear located in the steering column housing.

    Power Steering Control Module (PSCM)
    The PSCM uses a combination of torque sensor inputs, vehicle speed, calculated system temperature and the steering calibration to determine the amount of steering assist. When the steering wheel is turned, the PSCM uses signal voltage from the torque sensor to detect the amount of torque being applied to the steering column shaft and the amount of current to command to the EPS motor. The PSCM receives serial data from the engine control module (ECM) to determine vehicle speed. At low speeds more assist is provided for easy turning during parking maneuvers. At high speeds, less assist is provided for improved road feel and directional stability. The PSCM nor the EPS motor are designed to handle 58 amps continuously. The PSCM will go into overload protection mode to avoid system thermal damage. In this mode the PSCM will limit the amount of current commanded to the EPS motor which reduces steering assist levels. The PSCM also chooses which steering calibration to use when the ignition is turned ON, based on the production map number stored in the BCM. The PSCM contains all 8 of the steering calibrations which are different in relation to the vehicles RPO's. The PSCM has the ability to detect malfunctions within the EPS system. Any malfunction detected will cause the IPC message center to display PWR STR (or Power Steering) warning message.

    I suggest you get it to a buddy with a decent scan tool and take a look at the codes, but really if it's an 06 it's still under warranty...unless you have gone over the milage.

    And even then, alot of stuff can get goodwilled if you sweet talk a little

    EM

  10. #8
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    Another bit of info.

    Power Steering System Component Views

    Steering Wheel and Column

    1 - Turn Signal/Multifunction Switch
    2 - Inflatable Restraint Steering Wheel Module Coil
    3 - Windshield Wiper/Washer Switch
    4 - Steering Wheel
    5 - Steering Wheel Controls - Right (UK3)
    6 - Horn Switch
    7 - Steering Wheel Controls - Left (UK3)
    8 - Electronic Power Steering Control Module (EPS)
    9 - Electronic Power Steering (EPS) Control Motor
    10 - Ignition Switch
    11 - Ignition Lock Cylinder Control Solenoid (MN5)

    If you can get me some codes, I can help more.

    EM

  11. #9
    ... Some Kind Of Monster's Avatar
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    I’ll have to get it scanned. It isn’t from “locking” the wheel one way or another because the power steering goes out while driving straight on the freeway.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Eliminator Mojave View Post
    More info you might find useful.

    Power Steering System Description and Operation
    The electric power steering (EPS) system reduces the amount of effort needed to steer the vehicle. The system uses the body control module (BCM), power steering control module (PSCM), torque sensor, discrete battery voltage supply circuit, EPS motor, serial data bus, and the instrument panel cluster (IPC) message center to perform the system functions. The PSCM, torque sensor, not the EPS motor are serviced separately from each other or from the steering column. Any EPS components diagnosed to be malfunctioning requires replacement of the steering column assembly, also known as the EPS assembly.

    Torque Sensor
    The PSCM uses a torque sensor as it's main input for determining the amount of steering assist. The steering column has an input shaft, from the steering wheel to the torque sensor, and an output shaft, from the torque sensor to the steering shaft coupler. The input and output shafts are separated by a torsion bar, where the torque sensor is located. The sensor consists of a compensation coil, detecting coil and 3 detecting rings. These detecting rings have toothed edges that face each other. Detecting ring 1 is fixed to the output shaft, detecting rings 2 and 3 are fixed top the input shaft. The detecting coil is positioned around the toothed edges of detecting rings 1 and 2. As torque is applied to the steering column shaft the alignment of the teeth between detecting rings 1 and 2 changes, which causes the detecting coil signal voltage to change. The PSCM recognizes this change in signal voltage as steering column shaft torque. The compensation coil is used to compensate for changes in electrical circuit impedance due to circuit temperature changes from the electrical current and voltage levels as well as ambient temperatures for accurate torque detection.

    EPS Motor
    The EPS motor is a 12 volt brushed DC reversible motor with a 58 amp rating. The motor assists steering through a worm shaft and reduction gear located in the steering column housing.

    Power Steering Control Module (PSCM)
    The PSCM uses a combination of torque sensor inputs, vehicle speed, calculated system temperature and the steering calibration to determine the amount of steering assist. When the steering wheel is turned, the PSCM uses signal voltage from the torque sensor to detect the amount of torque being applied to the steering column shaft and the amount of current to command to the EPS motor. The PSCM receives serial data from the engine control module (ECM) to determine vehicle speed. At low speeds more assist is provided for easy turning during parking maneuvers. At high speeds, less assist is provided for improved road feel and directional stability. The PSCM nor the EPS motor are designed to handle 58 amps continuously. The PSCM will go into overload protection mode to avoid system thermal damage. In this mode the PSCM will limit the amount of current commanded to the EPS motor which reduces steering assist levels. The PSCM also chooses which steering calibration to use when the ignition is turned ON, based on the production map number stored in the BCM. The PSCM contains all 8 of the steering calibrations which are different in relation to the vehicles RPO's. The PSCM has the ability to detect malfunctions within the EPS system. Any malfunction detected will cause the IPC message center to display PWR STR (or Power Steering) warning message.

    I suggest you get it to a buddy with a decent scan tool and take a look at the codes, but really if it's an 06 it's still under warranty...unless you have gone over the milage.
    And even then, alot of stuff can get goodwilled if you sweet talk a little

    EM

    May still be in warranty but just cause it's an 06 probablly was sold in 05 and makes it going on 5yrs old.
    probablly out of the basic 3yr/36k miles.
    Just a thought.

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