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eyes on the river

  1. #1
    pay me or pay me no mind 707DOG's Avatar
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    Default eyes on the river

    Any eyes on the river how's the green monsters floating down the river. I got tomarrow off so I thinking about taking a ride.


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    Default On the news

    Saw on Sac news this morning how the river at Stockton was completely blocked by it. They were going to start harvesting and looking to spray it. Didn't mention other parts of the river.
    Idiot newscaster was making a point of how pretty it looked.
    Last edited by beenthere; 11-02-2014 at 06:50 AM.

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    Senior Member lake p.a.l.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 707DOG View Post
    Any eyes on the river how's the green monsters floating down the river. I got tomarrow off so I thinking about taking a ride.
    I was at B&W on Saturday morning & it looked pretty clear. The upper parts of the Delta are much better. We were out on Sunday & not that bad.

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    pay me or pay me no mind 707DOG's Avatar
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    Cool thanks lakepal that's where I plan on running up to probably go the long route thru Rio vista... I seen the story about the Stockton area what a mess. Hope that got better plans than just dragging it down river and releasing it


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    try attaching a snowplow on your bow and should be fine



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    Was out today from Orwood, lot's of stuff floating but didn't see any channels completely blocked. Seemed like the tide stayed high all the while we were out also. Ski beach was pretty clean except for all the water lilies.
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    Senior Member lake p.a.l.'s Avatar
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    Whiskey Slough is completely blocked for a mile. The SJR was packed from side to side by Delta YC & again before you get to Stockton ski beach. Be careful out there, some large debris tangled up with the hyacinth.
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    From Webb Tract HQ heading east on SJR, it's patchy... 1/4 mile stretches relatively clear then some 20mph zig zags to weave through. The further east, the worse it gets. That 3rd pic above is 1/4 mile before Windmill looking east and it's green as far as the eye can see... probably packed all the way to Stockton. Crazy. I'd say stay west of middle river and go north. There's still a ton of hyacinth that hasn't broken free yet so it's going to get worse before it get's better.
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    IDGAF acatitude's Avatar
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    watch out for bass boats hiding in there also. they are very hard to see



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    So my dad and I were talking about the weeds out there. We know they have always had some, but is this year, or recent years becoming as bigger problem. Have they always sprayed? Are there any patterns (time of year and locations)? My dad used to take us there when I was real young, but until recently we have stayed lake bound. We are planning on more delta time, just uncertain of some of the hurdles, which make making solo trips a little uncertain..

  13. #11
    rollin on the river DAVEO's Avatar
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    The problem is all the water being sent to LA so they can keep there lawns green all year round. It's getting worse and worse every year. The delta ecosystem is dieing fast.
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    Sounds like some of the other waterways and lakes. How does sending the water away cause this? I would understand if there is a water depth problem, is that the problem? Someone else told me that these all die off in the winter due to the cold temps. Is that true? Steve

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    Default From Wiki...

    Steve... you asked!!!!


    Eichhornia crassipes
    , commonly known as (common)
    water hyacinthis an aquatic plant native to the Amazon basin, and is often considered a highly problematic invasive species outside its native range.

    Its habitat ranges from tropical desert to subtropical or warm temperate desert to rainforest zones. The temperature tolerance of the water hyacinth is the following; its minimum growth temperature is 12° C (54° F); its optimum growth temperature is 25-30° C (77-86° F); its maximum growth temperature is 33-35° C (92-95° F), and its pH tolerance is estimated at 5.0 to 7.5. It does not tolerate water temperatures >35°C. Leaves are killed by frost and salt water, the latter trait being used to kill some of it by floating rafts of the cut weed to the sea. Water hyacinths do not grow when the averagesalinity is greater than 15% that of sea water.

    The water hyacinth was introduced in 1884 at the World's Fair in New Orleans, also known as the World Cotton Centennial.[10] The plants had been given away as a gifts by a group of visiting Japanese.[10] Soon after, the water hyacinth was choking rivers, killing fish and stopping shipping in Louisiana, and an estimated 50 kilograms per square meter choked Florida's waterways.[11] There were many attempts to eradicate the flower, including one by the U.S. War Department to pour oil over many of the flowers, but none worked.[10] In 1910, a bold solution was put forth by the New Foods Society. Their plan was to import and release hippopotamus from Africa into the rivers and bayous of Louisiana. The hippopotamus would then eat the water hyacinth.

    Water hyacinth can be controlled using three methods:
    Chemical control

    The application of herbicides for controlling water hyacinth has been carried out for many years and has been found successful when dealing with small infestations. A main concern when using herbicides is the environmental and health related effects, especially where people collect water for drinking and washing.
    Physical control

    Physical control is performed by land based machines such as bucket cranes, draglines, or boorm or by water based machinery such as aquatic weed harvester,[16] dredges, or vegetation shredder.[17]Mechanical removal is seen as the best short-term solution to the proliferation of the plant. A project on Lake Victoria in Africa used various pieces of equipment to chop, collect, and dispose of 1500 hectares of water hyacinth in a 12 month period. It is however costly and requires the use of both land and water vehicles, but it took many years for the lake to become in poor condition and reclamation will be a continual process.


    Biological control



    The effort began in the 1970s when USDA researchers released three species of weevil known to feed on water hyacinth into the United States, Neochetina bruchi,N. eichhorniae, and the water hyacinth borer Sameodes albiguttalis. Although meeting with limited success, the weevils have since been released in more than 20 other countries. However, the most effective control method remains the control of excessive nutrients and prevention of the spread of this species.
    May 2010 the USDA’s Agricultural Research Service released Megamelus scutellaris as a biological control insect for the invasive waterhyacinth species.Megamelus scutellaris is a small planthopper insect native to Argentina. Researchers have been studying the effects of the biological control agent in extensive host-range studies since 2006 and concluded that the insect is highly host-specific and will not pose a threat to any other plant population other than the targeted water hyacinth. Researchers also hope that the biological control will be more resilient than existing biological controls to the herbicides that are already in place to combat the invasive water hyacinth.


    Uses

    Bioenergy

    Because of its extremely high rate of development, Eichhornia crassipes is an excellent source of biomass. One hectare of standing crop thus produce more than 70,000 m3 of biogas.[21] According to Curtis and Duke, one kg of dry matter can yield 370 liters of biogas, giving a heating value of 22,000 kJ/m3 (580 Btu/ft3) compared to pure methane (895 Btu/ft3)
    Bengali farmers collect and pile up these plants to dry at the onset of the cold season; they then use the dry water hyacinths as fuel. They then use the ashes as fertilizer. In India, a ton of dried water hyacinth yield circa 50 liters ethanol and 200 kg residual fiber (7,700 Btu). Bacterial fermentation of one ton yields 26,500 cu ft gas (600 Btu) with 51.6% methane, 25.4% hydrogen, 22.1% CO
    2
    , and 1.2% oxygen. Gasification of one ton dry matter by air and steam at high temperatures (800°) gives circa 40,000 ft3 (circa 1,100 m3) natural gas (143 Btu/cu ft) containing 16.6% hydrogen, 4.8% methane, 21.7% CO, 4.1% CO
    2
    , and 52.8%N. The high moisture content of water hyacinth, adding so much to handling costs, tends to limit commercial ventures. A continuous, hydraulic production system could be designed, which would provide a better utilization of capital investments than in conventional agriculture, which is essentially a batch operation.

    The labour involved in harvesting water hyacinth can be greatly reduced by locating collection sites and processors on impoundments that take advantage of prevailing winds. Wastewater treatment systems could also favourably be added to this operation. The harvested biomass would then be converted to ethanol, natural gas, hydrogen and/or gaseous nitrogen, and fertilizer. The resultingbyproducts of water and fertilizer can both be used to irrigate nearby cropland.[2]
    Phytoremediation, waste water treatment

    The roots of Eichhornia crassipes naturally absorb pollutants, including lead, mercury, and strontium-90, as well as some organic compounds believed to be carcinogenic, in concentrations 10,000 times that in the surrounding water.[28] Water hyacinths can be cultivated for waste water treatment.
    Water hyacinth is reported for its efficiency to remove about 60–80 % nitrogen (Fox et al. 2008) and about 69% of potassium from water (Zhou et al. 2007). The roots of water hyacinth were found to remove particulate matter and nitrogen in a natural shallow eutrophicated wetland
    Edibility

    The plant is used as a carotene-rich table vegetable in Taiwan. Japanese sometimes cook and eat the green parts and inflorescence.
    Medicinal use

    In Kedah (Java), the flowers are used for medicating the skin of horses. The species is a "tonic."
    Other uses

    In East Africa, water hyacinths from Lake Victoria are used to make furniture, handbags and rope. The plant is also used as animal feed and organic fertilizer although there is controversy stemming from the high alkaline pH value of the fertilizer. Though a study found water hyacinths of very limited use for paper production,[34] they are nonetheless being used for paper production on a small scale.
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    Senior Member littlejockocougar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ptc View Post
    Steve... you asked!!!!


    Eichhornia crassipes
    , commonly known as (common)
    water hyacinthis an aquatic plant native to the Amazon basin, and is often considered a highly problematic invasive species outside its native range.

    Its habitat ranges from tropical desert to subtropical or warm temperate desert to rainforest zones. The temperature tolerance of the water hyacinth is the following; its minimum growth temperature is 12° C (54° F); its optimum growth temperature is 25-30° C (77-86° F); its maximum growth temperature is 33-35° C (92-95° F), and its pH tolerance is estimated at 5.0 to 7.5. It does not tolerate water temperatures >35°C. Leaves are killed by frost and salt water, the latter trait being used to kill some of it by floating rafts of the cut weed to the sea. Water hyacinths do not grow when the averagesalinity is greater than 15% that of sea water.

    The water hyacinth was introduced in 1884 at the World's Fair in New Orleans, also known as the World Cotton Centennial.[10] The plants had been given away as a gifts by a group of visiting Japanese.[10] Soon after, the water hyacinth was choking rivers, killing fish and stopping shipping in Louisiana, and an estimated 50 kilograms per square meter choked Florida's waterways.[11] There were many attempts to eradicate the flower, including one by the U.S. War Department to pour oil over many of the flowers, but none worked.[10] In 1910, a bold solution was put forth by the New Foods Society. Their plan was to import and release hippopotamus from Africa into the rivers and bayous of Louisiana. The hippopotamus would then eat the water hyacinth.

    Water hyacinth can be controlled using three methods:
    Chemical control

    The application of herbicides for controlling water hyacinth has been carried out for many years and has been found successful when dealing with small infestations. A main concern when using herbicides is the environmental and health related effects, especially where people collect water for drinking and washing.
    Physical control

    Physical control is performed by land based machines such as bucket cranes, draglines, or boorm or by water based machinery such as aquatic weed harvester,[16] dredges, or vegetation shredder.[17]Mechanical removal is seen as the best short-term solution to the proliferation of the plant. A project on Lake Victoria in Africa used various pieces of equipment to chop, collect, and dispose of 1500 hectares of water hyacinth in a 12 month period. It is however costly and requires the use of both land and water vehicles, but it took many years for the lake to become in poor condition and reclamation will be a continual process.


    Biological control



    The effort began in the 1970s when USDA researchers released three species of weevil known to feed on water hyacinth into the United States, Neochetina bruchi,N. eichhorniae, and the water hyacinth borer Sameodes albiguttalis. Although meeting with limited success, the weevils have since been released in more than 20 other countries. However, the most effective control method remains the control of excessive nutrients and prevention of the spread of this species.
    May 2010 the USDA’s Agricultural Research Service released Megamelus scutellaris as a biological control insect for the invasive waterhyacinth species.Megamelus scutellaris is a small planthopper insect native to Argentina. Researchers have been studying the effects of the biological control agent in extensive host-range studies since 2006 and concluded that the insect is highly host-specific and will not pose a threat to any other plant population other than the targeted water hyacinth. Researchers also hope that the biological control will be more resilient than existing biological controls to the herbicides that are already in place to combat the invasive water hyacinth.


    Uses

    Bioenergy

    Because of its extremely high rate of development, Eichhornia crassipes is an excellent source of biomass. One hectare of standing crop thus produce more than 70,000 m3 of biogas.[21] According to Curtis and Duke, one kg of dry matter can yield 370 liters of biogas, giving a heating value of 22,000 kJ/m3 (580 Btu/ft3) compared to pure methane (895 Btu/ft3)
    Bengali farmers collect and pile up these plants to dry at the onset of the cold season; they then use the dry water hyacinths as fuel. They then use the ashes as fertilizer. In India, a ton of dried water hyacinth yield circa 50 liters ethanol and 200 kg residual fiber (7,700 Btu). Bacterial fermentation of one ton yields 26,500 cu ft gas (600 Btu) with 51.6% methane, 25.4% hydrogen, 22.1% CO
    2
    , and 1.2% oxygen. Gasification of one ton dry matter by air and steam at high temperatures (800°) gives circa 40,000 ft3 (circa 1,100 m3) natural gas (143 Btu/cu ft) containing 16.6% hydrogen, 4.8% methane, 21.7% CO, 4.1% CO
    2
    , and 52.8%N. The high moisture content of water hyacinth, adding so much to handling costs, tends to limit commercial ventures. A continuous, hydraulic production system could be designed, which would provide a better utilization of capital investments than in conventional agriculture, which is essentially a batch operation.

    The labour involved in harvesting water hyacinth can be greatly reduced by locating collection sites and processors on impoundments that take advantage of prevailing winds. Wastewater treatment systems could also favourably be added to this operation. The harvested biomass would then be converted to ethanol, natural gas, hydrogen and/or gaseous nitrogen, and fertilizer. The resultingbyproducts of water and fertilizer can both be used to irrigate nearby cropland.[2]
    Phytoremediation, waste water treatment

    The roots of Eichhornia crassipes naturally absorb pollutants, including lead, mercury, and strontium-90, as well as some organic compounds believed to be carcinogenic, in concentrations 10,000 times that in the surrounding water.[28] Water hyacinths can be cultivated for waste water treatment.
    Water hyacinth is reported for its efficiency to remove about 60–80 % nitrogen (Fox et al. 2008) and about 69% of potassium from water (Zhou et al. 2007). The roots of water hyacinth were found to remove particulate matter and nitrogen in a natural shallow eutrophicated wetland
    Edibility

    The plant is used as a carotene-rich table vegetable in Taiwan. Japanese sometimes cook and eat the green parts and inflorescence.
    Medicinal use

    In Kedah (Java), the flowers are used for medicating the skin of horses. The species is a "tonic."
    Other uses

    In East Africa, water hyacinths from Lake Victoria are used to make furniture, handbags and rope. The plant is also used as animal feed and organic fertilizer although there is controversy stemming from the high alkaline pH value of the fertilizer. Though a study found water hyacinths of very limited use for paper production,[34] they are nonetheless being used for paper production on a small scale.


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