Handling a L19 rod bolt
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Handling a L19 rod bolt

  1. #1
    Senior Member Franger's Avatar
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    Default Handling a L19 rod bolt

    I was told NOT to handle L19 rod bolts without gloves. So I called ARP tech support and they said the same thing and sent me these from their catalog,

    PAGE 19
    20. How does L19 compare to ARP2000?
    L19 differs from ARP2000 in that it is a vacuum melted
    alloyed steel with sufficient chromium and carbon to achieve
    high hardness (but below the level of a stainless steel). L19 is
    air-cooled from the hardening temperature in a way that does
    not require an oil quench to achieve full hardness and is tempered to assure full conversion to martensite between 1025°F
    and 1075˚F. L19 is a proprietary material capable of achieving
    strengths of 220,000/230,000 or 260,000/270,000 psi as may
    be required. Both L19 and ARP2000 steels are modified bcc
    (martensite) at room temperature. L19 has the same advantage as ARP2000 in that a high strength is obtained at a high
    tempering temperature. This alloy is easily contaminated and
    requires special handling.

    PAGE 20
    L19: This is a premium steel that is processed to deliver superior strength
    and fatigue properties. L19 is a very high strength material compared to
    8740 and ARP2000 and is capable of delivering a clamp load at 260,000
    psi. It is primarily used in short track and drag racing applications where
    inertia loads exceed the clamping capability of ARP2000. Like most high
    strength, quench and temper steels – L19 requires special care during
    manufacturing to avoid hydrogen embrittlement. This material is easily
    contaminated and subject to stress corrosion. It must be kept well-oiled
    and not exposed to moisture.

    Could the handling seen in the pics be cause for concern or is the advice from ARP overkill ?

    The pics are not my hands BTW......
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  3. #2
    Manwhore!!!!! Quick99's Avatar
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    LOL it can handle 260 000 psi but don't touch it.......it will crumble like Obamas presidency.

  4. #3
    gn7
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    The L19 bolt is highly susceptible to stress corrosion. You could handle one for days, and set it on a table and it would probably be fine. Install it in an engine, load it with torque, and it will start to corrode.
    If you should handle one, you can simply wipe it real good with iso propyl alcohol or acetone, and oil it real well.

    Not that it is a bad bolt, but I am not a fan of the bolt in none race situations. If you neglect the oil and allow acid or moisture to collect in the oil it can attack the bolt.
    The ARP 2000 is virtually totally ammune to corrosion and is almost as strong as the L19 and has better fatique life. Its why the 2000 bolt is the most common bolt up grade in after market rods. The 2000 bolt is stronger than most rods it is installed in. You will more than likely fail the rod before you fail a ARP 2000 bolt



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    Senior Member Franger's Avatar
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    That is what the tech said also......Thanks Bob

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    GN7 I really like your knowledge and REALLY do appriciate it ,,, that is a great explanation, my hats off to you Sir


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    Quote Originally Posted by gn7 View Post
    The L19 bolt is highly susceptible to stress corrosion. You could handle one for days, and set it on a table and it would probably be fine. Install it in an engine, load it with torque, and it will start to corrode.
    If you should handle one, you can simply wipe it real good with iso propyl alcohol or acetone, and oil it real well.

    Not that it is a bad bolt, but I am not a fan of the bolt in none race situations. If you neglect the oil and allow acid or moisture to collect in the oil it can attack the bolt.
    The ARP 2000 is virtually totally ammune to corrosion and is almost as strong as the L19 and has better fatique life. Its why the 2000 bolt is the most common bolt up grade in after market rods. The 2000 bolt is stronger than most rods it is installed in. You will more than likely fail the rod before you fail a ARP 2000 bolt
    X2...stress corrosion from hydrogen embrittlement, even from the moisture in your hands. The L19 is seldom worth the hassle.
    If God is your co-pilot, change seats!
    Acts 2:38, the perfect answer to the perfect question.

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    steelcomp was here
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    Quote Originally Posted by Franger View Post
    [/U][/B]Could the handling seen in the pics be cause for concern or is the advice from ARP overkill ?

    The pics are not my hands BTW......[/FONT]
    Good Lord! Those hands could ruin an anvil!

    If God is your co-pilot, change seats!
    Acts 2:38, the perfect answer to the perfect question.

  10. #8
    gn7
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    Quote Originally Posted by steelcomp View Post
    Good Lord! Those hands could ruin an anvil!

    A quick trip to Jazz Nails would fix them puppies right up.



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    Quote Originally Posted by steelcomp View Post
    X2...stress corrosion from hydrogen embrittlement, even from the moisture in your hands. The L19 is seldom worth the hassle.
    and the acidity content varies from one person to another and will cause it to rust fast with some people.

  12. #10
    gn7
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    A couple of things should be mentioned here.
    First, don't even remotely consider ever cleaning a L19 bolt with carb or brake cleaner. The chlorine in the stuff is certain death to the bolt.
    Second, don't let a can of Prolong or Duralube within 1000 ft of your engine, for exactly the same reason.

    Like Steel said, the bolt is very susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. But that is a much bigger factor in the manufacturing the bolt than in the use. It can occure in use, but plain old every day stress in the wrong environment and the bolt is toast and is much easier to occur with the L19 in use.

    It takes 3 things to cause stress corrosion.
    1. The right metal.
    2. the right corrosive
    3. sufficient tensile stress

    This is one of the best sites I have read on the subject wthout getting all "scientific" in the language.

    http://www.npl.co.uk/upload/pdf/stress.pdf



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    I agree! ARP 2000's are great and not as fussy as the L19's. L19's do have a higher clamp force but unless you really need it for your application stick with the 2000's.

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    gn7
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    Quote Originally Posted by WETTE VETTE View Post
    I agree! ARP 2000's are great and not as fussy as the L19's. L19's do have a higher clamp force but unless you really need it for your application stick with the 2000's.
    The L19 does have more potential clamping force than the 2000. But in many of the import rods, you can't torque the L19 to it full clamping capability because the big end of the rod can't take it. Most import rods have a torque value almost the same for the L19n and 2000.

    I resently bought a set of Callies Ultra rods, and the L19 bolt is them is torqued to 95lbs. In a Scat or Eagle rod the L19 is more like 75lbs. In that situation, I much perfer the 2000 bolt, due to it's better fatique.



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    Quote Originally Posted by gn7 View Post
    The L19 does have more potential clamping force than the 2000. But in many of the import rods, you can't torque the L19 to it full clamping capability because the big end of the rod can't take it. Most import rods have a torque value almost the same for the L19n and 2000.

    I resently bought a set of Callies Ultra rods, and the L19 bolt is them is torqued to 95lbs. In a Scat or Eagle rod the L19 is more like 75lbs. In that situation, I much perfer the 2000 bolt, due to it's better fatique.
    What was the stretch spec on the Callies Rods for the L19's? I think Eagle says 75 ft-lbs or .0075" stretch or something close to that. On the ones I have built the .0075" came with 70 - 75 ft-lbs. I assume at 95 ft-lbs the bolt would stretch a bit more.

  16. #14
    gn7
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    Quote Originally Posted by WETTE VETTE View Post
    What was the stretch spec on the Callies Rods for the L19's? I think Eagle says 75 ft-lbs or .0075" stretch or something close to that. On the ones I have built the .0075" came with 70 - 75 ft-lbs. I assume at 95 ft-lbs the bolt would stretch a bit more.
    There are 2 L19 bolts, with 2 different tensile strengths. Don't ask me why. Also, the stretch is a factor of the cross section of the bolt. Most 7/16 L19s supplied with Scat or Eagle rods is under cut. The ones supplied with the Callies rods were not. The stretch is 6.5 to 7. Which is a PERFECT reason to KNOW the bolt that you are using and that it is the CORRECT bolt for the rod. Not all L19 bolts are the same, even if they have the same tensile rating. If the bolt is undercut, it will have a different TORQUE value than a non undercut bolt. Again, another GOOD reason for measuring stretch. If you were to torque the bolts in my Callies rods to 75 lbs, they would probably fail pretty quick due to being under stretched which is usually worse than or stretched.



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    Last edited by gn7; 08-08-2012 at 07:16 PM.

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