Porting bench / table
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Porting bench / table

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    Default Porting bench / table

    What are you guys using as a porting area? Ready to do something different. Was thinking of several different design's but thought I might get some good feed back, tired of the mess. Thinking of some type of preferated bench top with vacuum collection. Pics would be appreciated thanks Scott.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott King View Post
    What are you guys using as a porting area? Ready to do something different. Was thinking of several different design's but thought I might get some good feed back, tired of the mess. Thinking of some type of preferated bench top with vacuum collection. Pics would be appreciated thanks Scott.
    I want to build one too so i would also appreciate some pics.



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    There are some commercially avail, and the price isn't bad. The price is in the dust collection. But I have a special need due to space restrictions. I thought some one would have a bench / particle recovery system set they would share. I have to many head / engines to get out before I build a bench, but I will post pics and design when I make mine.

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    We've built some down draft tables that used heavy gauge perf plate for the top of a box about 12" deep and hooked to one of these things . Not sure what they used them for, but the things out sucked any female I ever knew. YOU ARE TALKING BANK!! I guess a couple good shop vacs may work, but their life span will be limited.


    But there is a simpler/cheaper way to do it, and personally, In think you're over thinking it. Head porting is back breaking stuff. Only crazed loons do it repeatedly. I can't stand a bench long enough to assemble a carb, let alone port a head.





    I have seen these with lights in the hose as well.
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    Last edited by gn7; 11-18-2012 at 04:38 PM.

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    You are absolutely correct, I was over thinking it. You have my wheels turning now. I used a three station approach if you will. But you might find an iron small block head being worked or a jet pump suction piece, or no telling what. A down draft table would be ideal, and your barrel gave me what I was missing. I am a poor bastard so I have to deal with the back breaking part of it. Lol

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott King View Post
    You are absolutely correct, I was over thinking it. You have my wheels turning now. I used a three station approach if you will. But you might find an iron small block head being worked or a jet pump suction piece, or no telling what. A down draft table would be ideal, and your barrel gave me what I was missing. I am a poor bastard so I have to deal with the back breaking part of it. Lol
    The box under the perf will collect the junk not the shop vac. You'll need to be able to empty it, but it will hold a shit load of junk.
    The shop vacs don't seem to last long only because they aren't designed and built for continous running. There is a reason that car washes use those big ass vac they do, and its not due to capacity or suction power, its becuase they are commerical units and will take the abuse.

    Any good shop vac will create the depression you need, the number of them you need depends on the size of the table and the total area of the open perf plate.



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    Quote Originally Posted by gn7 View Post
    The box under the perf will collect the junk not the shop vac. You'll need to be able to empty it, but it will hold a shit load of junk.
    The shop vacs don't seem to last long only because they aren't designed and built for continous running. There is a reason that car washes use those big ass vac they do, and its not due to capacity or suction power, its becuase they are commerical units and will take the abuse.

    Any good shop vac will create the depression you need, the number of them you need depends on the size of the table and the total area of the open perf plate.
    I work on a plain old bench. 1-1/8" ply top, overhead lighting, overhead air (see pic below).
    As far as the mess, I grind for a while, then I reach over, grab the hose to my Sears Shop Vac and suck up the majority of the mess. I got tired of reaching for the switch to the vacuum every time I wanted to use it (probably every 10min. or so when I'm grinding) so I hooked up a foot switch.
    As far as the lifespan of a shop vac, this is why I use the Sears. The one I use for that is at least 25 yrs old. Maybe closer to 30 and it still works awesome. I have three Sears vacs.

    Last edited by scott foxwell; 11-18-2012 at 06:52 PM.
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    Default Good info

    Good info guys- wish I'd had it the first set of heads I ever worked on- I had iron dust/rust coming out of my nose for 3 days- and iron filing splinters that stayed under my skin on my hands until I dug them out. Next time- I got outside- used a respirator, gloves and a tyvek suit. Much better. Note- I don't claim I knew what I was doing- just that I did it...

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    Nice, thanks for the tips and ideas. Yes the method of work for a while then vac, has been the way. And the sears vacs are the toughest.

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    Almost 30 years ago we took an old steel office desk and got with a bud that ran an HVAC company. We cut a rectangle out in the middle of the desk, then made a plenum box directly under the hole and cover the hole with a grate made of expanded metal. Added an old a/c blower motor to it to suck the air down and ported it out the side of the building. The plenum has a front access panel where we can periodically clean out the grindings as well as retrieve tools that might get dropped in the hole. I use the side drawers to store grinders and supplies. We constructed a stud wall room and covered it with plastic. Suspended a couple of flourescent lights above it and grind away. It also makes for a great "spray booth" when painting small parts with a spraycan, etc. Was last grinding in there this evening.

    Easy, inexspensive and effective.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gearhead View Post
    Almost 30 years ago we took an old steel office desk and got with a bud that ran an HVAC company. We cut a rectangle out in the middle of the desk, then made a plenum box directly under the hole and cover the hole with a grate made of expanded metal. Added an old a/c blower motor to it to suck the air down and ported it out the side of the building. The plenum has a front access panel where we can periodically clean out the grindings as well as retrieve tools that might get dropped in the hole. I use the side drawers to store grinders and supplies. We constructed a stud wall room and covered it with plastic. Suspended a couple of flourescent lights above it and grind away. It also makes for a great "spray booth" when painting small parts with a spraycan, etc. Was last grinding in there this evening.

    Easy, inexspensive and effective.
    That is about what i have in mind, just with an industrial vac.

    There could be some issues with blowing metal dust: Dust explosion - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Just saying.

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    Explosions from alum are pretty rare. More likely from aluminum oxide than aluminumn chips or shavings from porting. Your not grinding them, your cutting the material. Even with a anding rolls it would be pretty difficult to ignite.

    The vast majority of dust explosions aside from coal mines is from food stuff, primarily grains. Not from metals. Now magnesium, that takes a little precaution. But its still relatively safe compared to something like corn starch. Biggest problem with mag is putting it out. Water is a big no no!



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    Quote Originally Posted by gn7 View Post
    Explosions from alum are pretty rare. More likely from aluminum oxide than aluminumn chips or shavings from porting. Your not grinding them, your cutting the material. Even with a anding rolls it would be pretty difficult to ignite.

    The vast majority of dust explosions aside from coal mines is from food stuff, primarily grains. Not from metals. Now magnesium, that takes a little precaution. But its still relatively safe compared to something like corn starch. Biggest problem with mag is putting it out. Water is a big no no!
    My guess is that 9 out of 10 people use a vacuum cleaner built for that purpose of taking up metal dust and chips.
    And there are some requirements to the dust to ignite.
    Coal and grains create dust when they are moved and in most cases they are moved in such big quantities that it is very hard to control the dust.

    So if you use cleaners and degreasers, some paint spraycan and a hand full of wood, metal or plastic dust you just have to throw it through a blower wich is making a spark through a worn carbon brush.

    Hope my words make sense

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    I'd say just about anything can be made to workhow much work you wish to invest and what is important aspects your lookign for. For me, the two most important thinngs... well three most important things are:

    1) PLENTY of light... you can never have enough light... or rather, you're better to error on the side of over lighted than under lit, imho.

    2) A nice area you don't mind messing up. No matter what sort of dust collection, chip colleter, walls, etc... the area immediatly aroud your porting area will get messy... it's just gonna happen. I have 3 18" tall walls on the sides and back of mine and even with using a shop vac... shit still manages to end up on the floor, bench, me, etc...

    3) Make sure the height is comfortable for you to work with. I used to port on a bench that must have belonged to a fucking pigmy... it was so short that I always had to be bent over or stack crap on it to get the hheads at a comfortable height.

    I like using wood because it's cheap... you can build anything you want, any size/height you want... and most importantly... I think parts are easier to keep from getting banged up on a wood surface better than a metal surface.

    This is what I built... it works great for me. I keep it in it's own corner of the world in my shop by where the mess won't travel elsewhere. The hole in the center is where the hose for the shop vac goes thru. Wood blocks are also a nice thing to have so you can prop whatever it is your working on in a postion that makes it easy to deal with.
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