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A1000

  1. #1
    Senior Member NiceGuyEddie's Avatar
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    Default A1000

    Bought a Aeromotive A1000. I was trying to figure out where to mount it in my 19 Shadow Tunnel Hull. Ive heard that I need to mount it as low as possible and I dont see that as an option. ...Is this a myth or true?


    http://www.jegs.com/i/Aeromotive/027/11101/10002/-1

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  3. #2
    cfm
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    It's true....mostly true.

    What you really want to make sure is that you have a head of fuel at the entry to the pump at all times so it is never run dry and doesn't cavitate.
    Therefore, mount it as low as you can and if it is not below lowest part of tank route the pump inlet line so it sweeps down to the pump. Think of a "J" or 'U' where the pump is at lowest part of the inlet line.

    Having it mounted where the fuel drains out of if the entry when pump is shut-off, will cause early death.

    An electric pump depends on gravity / siphoning power to feed it. Also fuel to lubricate and cool it. If air gets in the 'impellar' then it makes it extremely easy to cavitate and not pull liquid.

    In my experience, this pump pulls better than many other electricals, but I have still killed them !

    Put a screen type filter before the pump. Like a 100 micron cartride one Aeromotive/SX/others make. Yes, large free flowing one. These pumps hate crap going thru them.

    Lastly, make sure your tank venting is adequate ! Many aren't.

    ===================

    Sorry - hard to explain line routing without showing pics and I'm no artist. I'll try if you need futher / better explanation.

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    21 Daytona Outlaw's Avatar
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    just wanted to add ... the vent CFM is talking about
    is not the little hole in the cap, it must be a full flowing
    vent like this




    I'm using the Aeromotive 10 micron filter it will screw directly into the inlet of the pump with a -10
    union

    #55

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  6. #4
    steelcomp was here
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    Lastly, don't run a wire form the pump, to a switch on the dash, and back to the battery. Use a relay.
    If God is your co-pilot, change seats!
    Acts 2:38, the perfect answer to the perfect question.

  7. #5
    Senior Member NiceGuyEddie's Avatar
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    Default Thanks a ton for the input so far!

    Quote Originally Posted by cfm View Post
    It's true....mostly true.

    What you really want to make sure is that you have a head of fuel at the entry to the pump at all times so it is never run dry and doesn't cavitate.
    Therefore, mount it as low as you can and if it is not below lowest part of tank route the pump inlet line so it sweeps down to the pump. Think of a "J" or 'U' where the pump is at lowest part of the inlet line.

    Having it mounted where the fuel drains out of if the entry when pump is shut-off, will cause early death.

    An electric pump depends on gravity / siphoning power to feed it. Also fuel to lubricate and cool it. If air gets in the 'impellar' then it makes it extremely easy to cavitate and not pull liquid.

    In my experience, this pump pulls better than many other electricals, but I have still killed them !

    Put a screen type filter before the pump. Like a 100 micron cartride one Aeromotive/SX/others make. Yes, large free flowing one. These pumps hate crap going thru them.

    Lastly, make sure your tank venting is adequate ! Many aren't.

    ===================

    Sorry - hard to explain line routing without showing pics and I'm no artist. I'll try if you need futher / better explanation.


    I installed a Fram HPG1 fuel filter before the pump. Will this be ok, or should I change it?


    The only place I can think to mount it (where it would be lower than the tank) Is in the center sponson... which isnt really an option.

    Ok, then I figure I can mount it to the motor rail (almost even with the top of the tank) and sweep the fuel line down to it from the filter.... Is this kinda what your suggesting?



    Quote Originally Posted by Outlaw View Post
    just wanted to add ... the vent CFM is talking about
    is not the little hole in the cap, it must be a full flowing
    vent like this




    I'm using the Aeromotive 10 micron filter it will screw directly into the inlet of the pump with a -10
    union


    Thanks, Yes I only have the vents in my fuel fills. Did you mount in the boat or on the exterior? I really hate to drill more holes than needed.

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    Senior Member NiceGuyEddie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by steelcomp View Post
    Lastly, don't run a wire form the pump, to a switch on the dash, and back to the battery. Use a relay.

    Good call!

  9. #7
    cfm
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    Quote Originally Posted by rIVERtRASH View Post
    I installed a Fram HPG1 fuel filter before the pump. Will this be ok, or should I change it?
    IMHO - no, it is not okay. They are even marginal at best when mounted below the fuel tank. Here is the tech info on that filter:
    http://store.summitracing.com/partde...5&autoview=sku

    Follow Aeromotive's tech info. I quoted it here:

    #101 Fuel Filtration: Selecting the correct filter to prevent lean-out and pump failure.

    Fuel Filtration: Selecting the correct filter to prevent lean-out and pump failure.

    STOP!! If you are selling or installing a fuel filter for inlet protection of an Aeromotive fuel pump, be certain you do not use a filter that causes more problems than it solves. For pump inlet filtration, use only Aeromotive part #12304 or #12302 or an acceptable equivalent (see text for filter specifications). Do not install the Aeromotive #12301 filter, with 10-micron paper element, on the inlet or suction side of any Aeromotive fuel pump. Part #12301 is perfect for use on the pump outlet or pressure side and this is the only location for which it is recommended.

    You may run any brand of filter you choose on your car, just be certain that any filter installed meets the requirements specified here: The filtration media to be used on the inlet side of an Aeromotive fuel pump may be no smaller than 100-micron and must have an element surface area of 60 square inches or more. Any filter element not meeting these criteria may fail to flow the full volume of the pump being used, resulting in cavitation at the pump inlet. Aeromotive fuel pumps are extremely efficient by design, allowing them to create high pressure on the outlet and high vacuum on the inlet side, if restricted. Cavitation can be to a pump like detonation is to an engine and occurs when the liquid being pumped reaches a temperature where it boils and becomes vapor. The temperature at which any liquid boils varies with pressure. Recall that water in a radiator is purposely pressurized to raise the boiling point. When was the last time your high pressure EFI system vapor locked? Keep in mind, as a pump pushes it has to pull. When a pump has to pull too hard acquiring fuel, a vacuum or low-pressure area develops at the inlet. The better and more efficient the pump is, the lower inlet pressure will fall. The boiling point of any liquid fuel in this low-pressure zone falls as well. With a highly efficient pump, inlet pressure can get so low that fuel will boil and the pump will cavitate at normal operating temperatures. Today’s ultra-high output engines require equally high efficiency fuel pumps. Failure to install them properly can be costly in two ways: First, during cavitation the engine may experience a momentary lean condition (losses of liquid fuel pressure and volume). Second, excess heat and friction will build in the pump, causing damage and eventual failure. If you feed your Aeromotive pump properly it will feed your beast for years to come! Review your installation and make sure the pump is mounted where gravity will help push fuel to the inlet, use the correct size AN line between the tank and the pump and install filters that flow the necessary volume freely.

    All Aeromotive pumps except the Pro Series EFI pump may use the Aeromotive filter #12304 with –10 inlet and outlet fittings and 100-micron stainless steel element. The Pro Series EFI pump #11102 requires filter #12302 with larger stainless steel element and –12 inlet and outlet fittings. The #12302 is also recommended for the #11104 EFI Eliminator pump and our new #11105 belt drive pump (try 400gph or 2700lb/hr of fuel delivery at 100psi!!).
    As far as fuel tank venting:

    BG says:
    Inadequate fuel cell venting - If the fuel cell vent is too small the fuel system can malfunction. In extreme cases, inadequate ventilation can cause permanent damage to the system. As the fuel pump draws fuel from the cell i t needs to be replaced by air . If the vent on the cell is too small the pump will try to draw the fuel from the cell faster than the air replaces it. This can create a vacuum in the cell , distort its shape, and starve the pump and engine of the fuel it requires.
    MagnaFuel Fuel Systems says:
    Attention to this detail may make the difference between winning and losing. -8 AN is preferred. Some applications need a -10 AN.

  10. #8
    steelcomp was here
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    Sometimes, there are factors outside your control, so you have to do the best you can. This is how I mounted the pump and plumbed the system when I ran saddle tanks in my Bahner.





    The boat is a mod v, and has small sponsons on the outside and the tanks sat down inside them so access to the tank for a bottom bung was impossible. The tanks were mounted so they were almost touching the transom so a bung on the bottom of the back of the tank was impossible without re-locating the tanks. I opted to use the factory pick-up from the top of the tank which I knew wasn't ideal, so I worked with what I had. You can see the lines going into a T, right above the jet pump. Those were -8 lines from the tanks, and both the same length. I also had a Russel screen filter at each tank outlet. The two -8 lines went into a -8/-10 T that I had to make. The line from the T to the pump is a -10. The pump isn't very low, as you can see. The tops of the tanks are about even with the -8 lines going across the transom. I've also gotten grief about mounting the pump flat. It doesn't bother me that way. The line to the front of the engine from the pump is also -10. I never had a single issue with this set-up. It fed 820hp all day long, and at WOT for several minutes at a time. The tankas also fed very evenly.
    I will say that venting is criticl. There are formulas that will tell you what your vent area should be, but no less than a 3/8 line IMO. I made a section of tube in the filler neck and welded in a 3/8 hose fitting for my vents. (Tanks were not vented)
    If God is your co-pilot, change seats!
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    21 Daytona Outlaw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rIVERtRASH View Post
    Thanks, Yes I only have the vents in my fuel fills. Did you mount in the boat or on the exterior? I really hate to drill more holes than needed.
    Mine is mounted on the exterior, sometimes when the fuel expandes
    it will overflow.

    I would go with the aeromotive or equivelent prefilter and run at least -10.

    and mount the pump as low as you can get, the tech support guys
    at aeromotive are great and gave me lots of good advise.
    #55

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    Senior Member NiceGuyEddie's Avatar
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    So I ordered the new Aremotive filter a few mins ago.

    ...Anyone want to buy a brand new HPG1?

    Ill have to figure out how Im going to vent the tanks as I do not want anything on the exterior.

    Thanks again for all the advice!! Exactly why I love these forums and dont subscribe to the boat mags anymore... cant get answers like that.. nor that fast!

  13. #11
    gn7
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    look at those chiney ass motor plates. Now I know why mine are anode black. I don't have enuff time between blowed up motors to maintain that! NICE CHIT!



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    Last edited by gn7; 11-21-2008 at 04:24 PM.

  14. #12
    21 Daytona Outlaw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rIVERtRASH View Post
    So I ordered the new Aremotive filter a few mins ago.

    ...Anyone want to buy a brand new HPG1?
    whats the flow and micron rating of it?
    you can use it as a post filter if it will flow enough

    edit, nevermind I just read it has 3/8 ports
    #55

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    Senior Member smitt19's Avatar
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    Default mount

    I mounted mine on the side of the stringer (daytona) never had a problem with this pump, love it, also used the arom. stainless steel filter they also recommend there paper element after the pump between the carb and pump
    did it without for three years without a problem, but recently had issues so I'm going to get it, relay also there recomend.

  16. #14
    Senior Member NiceGuyEddie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by smitt19 View Post
    I mounted mine on the side of the stringer (daytona) never had a problem with this pump, love it, also used the arom. stainless steel filter they also recommend there paper element after the pump between the carb and pump
    did it without for three years without a problem, but recently had issues so I'm going to get it, relay also there recomend.


    Exactly what I was thinking (outside the stringer)..Made a s/s bracket today.

    Quote Originally Posted by Outlaw View Post
    whats the flow and micron rating of it?
    you can use it as a post filter if it will flow enough

    edit, nevermind I just read it has 3/8 ports
    3/8 from the tank to the T is ok though right?

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