[Question] Draining block water
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Draining block water

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    Senior Member Jetdream'n's Avatar
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    Default Draining block water

    With amount of money we have invested in these performance motors, I'm just curious. With the exception of normal end of season wintering, how many of you jet, v-drive lake/river guys are draining what water you can out of your blocks after every weekend or race? I know after running in places like Firebird, a fresh water flush and drain is a must. I've put petcock drains on my block and try and drain it after every use no matter where I run it. Just something I've always done. Is this over kill? A friend of mine flushes his v-drive with a biodegradable antifreeze and leaves it in the block for anti rust and corrosion purposes every trip... thoughts?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jetdream'n View Post
    With amount of money we have invested in these performance motors, I'm just curious. With the exception of normal end of season wintering, how many of you jet, v-drive lake/river guys are draining what water you can out of your blocks after every weekend or race? I know after running in places like Firebird, a fresh water flush and drain is a must. I've put petcock drains on my block and try and drain it after every use no matter where I run it. Just something I've always done. Is this over kill? A friend of mine flushes his v-drive with a biodegradable antifreeze and leaves it in the block for anti rust and corrosion purposes every trip... thoughts?
    Depending on which body of water I go to, I try to flush my block every time. (All of mine are fresh water bodies)
    Mine's a V-drive, but I run water into a bucket and connect a tube to the water pick-up tube and start the motor and let it run for a short length of time or until the motor starts getting warm while letting the water do the flushing.

    Even many fresh water lakes and rivers have salt content, and if you've looked at the water passages when the aluminum heads are off, you'll know why. It may be less important with iron heads.
    If you do it at home, just don't do it late at night, not everyone likes the sound of headers.

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    Senior Member Rivernut's Avatar
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    I have raw water cooling, boat in fresh water and only drain the engine during freezing weather. If you drain it all of the time it will corrode faster because of the presence of oxygen. Get a hobby and stop draining it!

    Real Boats Don't Have Propellers!
    -- Rivernut

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rivernut View Post
    I have raw water cooling, boat in fresh water and only drain the engine during freezing weather. If you drain it all of the time it will corrode faster because of the presence of oxygen. Get a hobby and stop draining it!
    So are you saying that it won't corrode or rust with water in it?

    Water contains oxygen, so yes it will corrode, oxidize and rust with water in the motor. If it had distilled water it might do it less, I'm not sure. However, most river and lake water contains other chemicals.
    As far as not draining the engine, in a v-drive the engine water will drain itself to where the water enters the block most of the time. That's the water inlet on the block, as it seeps back out past the water pump impeller. I would venture to say, jets do the same thing. They partially drain themselves.

    Had you thoroughly read my post, or perhaps I wasn't clear, you'd notice that I didn't say anything about draining the motor, I said I run fresh water through the engine to flush it. In my case, there is one river that I use that contains a higher percentage of salt than some others. It's naturally occurring salt, and not like sea water.

    I've seen what happens to aluminum heads through normal use, and I don't believe it's from uncontaminated water.
    One of my hobbies is boating, and I do what I can to protect my equipment.

    If you don't want to take the time to flush your engine, it's your engine.
    A lot of people don't, and maybe it isn't necessary. It makes me feel better.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jimsplace View Post
    So are you saying that it won't corrode or rust with water in it?

    Water contains oxygen, so yes it will corrode, oxidize and rust with water in the motor. If it had distilled water it might do it less, I'm not sure. However, most river and lake water contains other chemicals.
    As far as not draining the engine, in a v-drive the engine water will drain itself to where the water enters the block most of the time. That's the water inlet on the block, as it seeps back out past the water pump impeller. I would venture to say, jets do the same thing. They partially drain themselves.

    Had you thoroughly read my post, or perhaps I wasn't clear, you'd notice that I didn't say anything about draining the motor, I said I run fresh water through the engine to flush it. In my case, there is one river that I use that contains a higher percentage of salt than some others. It's naturally occurring salt, and not like sea water.

    I've seen what happens to aluminum heads through normal use, and I don't believe it's from uncontaminated water.
    One of my hobbies is boating, and I do what I can to protect my equipment.

    If you don't want to take the time to flush your engine, it's your engine.
    A lot of people don't, and maybe it isn't necessary. It makes me feel better.
    I agree. I boat on the Mississippi And run fresh water thru until I stop seeing sand and silt or I feel it should be all out. The chemical content of lakes and rivers can be scary if you actually look at what is in it.
    So many projects, so little time

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    Senior Member Jetdream'n's Avatar
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    I mainly drain it to slow down the rusting and corrosion through out the engine. Fresh water flush sounds helpful. Is there a flush or additive that can be use to coat or add protection against any moisture left in the cooling passages after a flush and drain?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jetdream'n View Post
    I mainly drain it to slow down the rusting and corrosion through out the engine. Fresh water flush sounds helpful. Is there a flush or additive that can be use to coat or add protection against any moisture left in the cooling passages after a flush and drain?
    I haven't really checked into it and don't know of anything, but I've heard of people using anti-freeze.
    I hope you don't use anti-freeze though, as anti-freeze is deadly to fish and other wildlife.
    I recall seeing someone starting their motor at the lake once and there being green coming out the water dump, and thinking that if a game warden saw that, someone would be going to jail.
    Good luck.

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    Some guy obnoxious001's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jetdream'n View Post
    I mainly drain it to slow down the rusting and corrosion through out the engine. Fresh water flush sounds helpful. Is there a flush or additive that can be use to coat or add protection against any moisture left in the cooling passages after a flush and drain?
    Try looking up a product called Salt Away,, or maybe it's something similar.

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    Village Idiot fc-Pilot's Avatar
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    With the last few boats I have had I always drain the water while the engine is hot and have seen a substantial decrease in rust. Granted I go to the same lake all the time, so it is not like I am traveling all over to different boating spots. I like draining it and opening up some of the water exits to help let the evaporated water out.

    Do what makes you feel good inside.

    Paul

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    Senior Member Rivernut's Avatar
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    The rust you're washing out normally would be protecting it from rusting more. When you expose iron to oxygen in a damp environment you get rust. Ship wrecks have metal that stays intact for centuries if it is deep enough away from water containing oxygen. Primer paints are frequently made out of oxides. There are not enough chemicals to justify draining it. I've taught chemistry and taken limnology...former fisheries biologist. You are harming your engine more by draining it between trips unless you are in salt water.
    Last edited by Rivernut; 08-25-2016 at 09:55 PM.

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    Senior Member Jetdream'n's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fc-Pilot View Post
    With the last few boats I have had I always drain the water while the engine is hot and have seen a substantial decrease in rust. Granted I go to the same lake all the time, so it is not like I am traveling all over to different boating spots. I like draining it and opening up some of the water exits to help let the evaporated water out.

    Do what makes you feel good inside.

    Paul
    That's just it. In my mind, by draining after every trip, its adding to the longevity of my engine. Or is it? I do the same, drain it when there is still enough heat to help speed the remaining water to evaporate.

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    Senior Member Jetdream'n's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by obnoxious001 View Post
    Try looking up a product called Salt Away,, or maybe it's something similar.
    I used it on past salt water boats. Good stuff. Teflon (probably not good for the fishes) based product would be ideal. Some thing that can temporally coat the water passages while not in use.

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    Flushing the block is different from draining it.
    Typically, the water drains down to the water inlet level of the block when the motor is shut off.
    The water left in the block after flushing is the same as if you didn't circulate clean water.
    I rinse mine more to protect the aluminum heads than the iron block.
    To drain the block, one would have to remove the blocks drain plugs.

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    I have ball valves on my drains...I open them as part of my ritual preparing to secure the boat for transit when I pull it out of the water.

    I primarily do this because I never know when im going to get to the boat again and I live in an area that freezes early in the year (Wisconsin).

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