Measuring Tools
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread:
Measuring Tools

  1. #1
    Senior Member MBMoseBilt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    132

    Default Measuring Tools

    Well took the boat out and started to have some engine problems. I think its time to rebuild. I have a gen V 502 450 hp. I am going to put forged pistons and quality parts in the rebuild. I have alot of good tools like feeler guages, ring compressors, dial inticators, dial calipers and torque wrenches but I would like to get some better tools. I need a list well priced quality tools. I would like to build 550hp to 600 hp and I know i need better tools other than plasiguage. Thanks for the help.

  2. Remove Advertisements
    PerformanceBoats.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Senior Member lbhsbz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Long Beach
    Posts
    1,617

    Default

    Pick up a set of cheap micrometers like these:

    http://www.harborfreight.com/3-piece...set-66512.html

    and get an economy priced bore gauge...most go from 2 to 6", but a lot of them only have 0.0005 resolution. You want one with 0.0001 resolution. Check ebay...you should be able to find one for under $200. The acuracy of the tool really makes very little difference..all you are using it for is a comparative tool....you'll set the micrometer around the OD of something, then stick the bore guage in the mic and zero it at your OD, then measure the ID of the hole and see your clearance. You don't really care what the size is, just the size difference. most low cost tools can do this just fine. I like analog mechanical stuff over the electronic digital stuff because it won't lie to you as much.


  4. #3
    Distinguished Member David 519's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    NorCal
    Posts
    5,754

    Default

    I think it was Starrett that had the slogan in the late 70's: "If it can be measured, it can be made" . A LOT of high performance/race engine building is about being able to accurately measure parts and figure clearances. Like lbhsbz suggested, a good set of outside mics is a good place to start. Dial bore gauges are super easy to get accurate ID measurments, but if you have the touch, you can do it with telescope gages and for a lot less $$. Learn to get the same feel on the t-gage as on the mic and with practice, you can measure within a couple tenths. Take the time to learn to use these 2 tools well, and you'll be way ahead of your plastigage days. Good luck to you.
    Quote Originally Posted by gn7 View Post
    ....... David 519 is 100% correct........

    Quote Originally Posted by fuelinmyveins82 View Post
    .....I think people forget that racing is supposed to fun. Losing shouldn't be discouraging it should motivate you work on your pile to make it faster.....

  5. Remove Advertisements
    PerformanceBoats.com
    Advertisements
     

  6. #4
    Senior Member MBMoseBilt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    132

    Default

    Thanks for the insight. I have been looking at different manufactures and think a good start is the mics, snap gauges and dial bore gauge. Should I get depth gauge and straight edge? I need a list of good basics.

  7. #5
    I'm No Expert Shaun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    San Clemente, Ca
    Posts
    3,138

    Default

    These are what i used, i also had my dial bore gauge tested against a sunnen gauge and it was spot on.

    http://www.summitracing.com/parts/SUM-900041/

    http://www.summitracing.com/parts/SUM-900014/

    http://www.summitracing.com/parts/CCA-4796/

  8. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    S.W. PA.
    Posts
    574

    Default

    check local ads for an old machinist tool box.guys who were in the trade took care of their tools and the family selling off the stuff doesnt know the value. old b&s or starrett tools are long lasting and will serve you well. ever here the joke about buy a 10 dollar helmet if you have a 10 dollar head, if you want a junk motor buy junk tools.quality tools feel different in your hand and the like someone said before the feel is important to good measurement

+ Reply to Thread

Quick Reply Quick Reply

Register Now

Please enter the name by which you would like to log-in and be known on this site.

Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Please select your insurance company (Optional)

Log-in

Digg This Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may post new threads
  • You may post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95