Block Cleaning-Pros and Cons
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Block Cleaning-Pros and Cons

  1. #1
    Gone in a Flash! Speed of Heat's Avatar
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    Default Block Cleaning-Pros and Cons

    Which is better? Old school caustic boil out tank or New school Bake and shot blast? Pros and Cons? All my motors in the past were boil out, but now it seems its hard to find a boil out tank? I know I'm dating myself!
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  3. #2
    Some guy obnoxious001's Avatar
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    The burn and blast does end up removing most or all of the paint. Not sure where to find a conventional "hot tank" any more, don't think they are "legal"

  4. #3
    steelcomp was here
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    The machine shop I use still has an old fashioned hot tank. Bake and blast still needs washing of some kind. Jet washers get in a lot of places but I still spend an hour with solvent, then a hot soapy water scrub and rinse before final assy. Nothing will get into all the passages good enough for my liking besides long brushes and well directed high pressure water and air.
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  6. #4
    Some guy obnoxious001's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by steelcomp View Post
    but I still spend an hour with solvent, then a hot soapy water scrub and rinse before final assy. Nothing will get into all the passages good enough for my liking besides long brushes and well directed high pressure water and air.
    I think that pretty much goes without saying for any type of cleaning.

    I always end up grinding and de-burring the block after it comes back from the shop, so I am also very particular about hand washing the block with brushes and high pressure solvent, then high pressure water, then high pressure soap and water, then high pressure water, using the brushes every step of the way.

  7. #5
    LP-25.com Infomaniac's Avatar
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    If you bake and blast, You will be boring the cylinders. Won't have a choice.

    If it's a freshen up and hone only then vat it.

    It's impossible to get all of the shot blast out of the water jackets. You can brush it out of the oil passages. One thing is after one has been put in a bag. Being shaken from transportation can dislodge some of it and it ends up in the bag loose.
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  8. #6
    www.highflowdynamics.com LakesOnly's Avatar
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    PRO: The thermoclean process that I run our blocks through is a three-step process, where the block is rotisseried over an open gas flame and heated to about 300+ degrees. During that time, all the grease, rust, cooling system scale, engine paint, carbon, sludge, etc, practically just falls off. Step 2 is also a rotissereie box (different box) with a shot blast while the block is rotating, then further tumbled without shot blast so as to clear the block of shot; finally the block is washed in the last box.

    I've had blocks that looked like they were dumped into the ocean and then left out to rust for a month. Thermo-cleaning can make the most worst appearing block look new again.



    This block looks as good inside the water jackets and oiling galleries as it does on its exterior. I've never seen a process that cleans cylinder blocks better; it makes hot tanking look like little more than a de-greaser, which is all a hot tank essentially is in my opinion.

    CONS: There's only one I can think of (there may be more), and frankly it doesn't bother me much at all. The shot process lightly peens over the edges of the lifter bores, so you might want to ask that they use lifter bore protectors. I don't but I do take the time to lightly "ream" the lifter bore edge with a shart tool, and actually "ream" is such a harsh word as they barely require much clean-up at all...just a light touch and the lifters drop right in.
    Last edited by LakesOnly; 06-05-2011 at 12:35 PM.
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