Pump efficiency
+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 14 of 23

Thread:
Pump efficiency

  1. #1
    Member Flash's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    76

    Default Pump efficiency

    Shoe,

    I wanted to stop by your shop and ask this question but I figure somebody else may have the same question.

    You know my 21 daycruiser with a YJ converted to a Dominator energizer kit.

    I notice earlier model boats with any kind of jet (Berk, Legend, AT etc), the water that comes out of the pump seems to be more streamlined especially when the diverter is all the way up. Where mine comes out a lot more messy and not as streamlined. What do you think the difference is and does it effect efficiency.

    Thanks Bud

    Mike

  2. Remove Advertisements
    PerformanceBoats.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Pro Gas Jet RedPearl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Ausitn, TX
    Posts
    747

    Default c'mon shoe

    what do you think shoe?

    I wonder if a little air (aeration) in the exit side of the pump is good? Look at a jacuzzi or spa the valve lets air in on the jets, the thrust increases. makes me wonder. if you close the valve and its pure water the thrust isnt as strong.
    Don't be afraid to try something new. Remember, amateurs built the Ark...Professionals built the Titanic!

  4. #3
    Super Moderator HammerDown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    The Right Coast/SE-PA
    Posts
    5,488

    Default

    ^ interesting
    <img src=http://www.performanceboats.com/gallery/data/500/medium/06-30-11_1234.jpg border=0 alt= />

  5. Remove Advertisements
    PerformanceBoats.com
    Advertisements
     

  6. #4
    Member Flash's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    76

    Default

    I may have stumped him......

    I plan on bringing my boat to him this winter to take a look at gel coating the bottom. At 34 years old, I think the bottom needs some TLC. He's going to take a look at the pump to see what's going on. Another issue I want him to take a look at is my motor. I run the SH$T of the boat every year and my dad and I built the BBF in 93 and it still runs great, just don't know for how long.

  7. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Not unless you purchased the text messaging plan that has unlimited text messaging. I have 6 sprint phones and only one has text msg plan 1000 for $10.00. If we use text messaging on any others we have to pay 0.10 each.

  8. #6
    Senior Member hellnback's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Lake Dallas TX
    Posts
    746

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by stone cold View Post
    not unless you purchased the text messaging plan that has unlimited text messaging. I have 6 sprint phones and only one has text msg plan 1000 for $10.00. If we use text messaging on any others we have to pay 0.10 each.
    huh ??????????????
    It may be OLD ,it may be Slow ... but at least it's MOBILE !!!

  9. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    corona calif
    Posts
    1,119

    Default My Spray

    Quote Originally Posted by Flash View Post
    Shoe,

    I wanted to stop by your shop and ask this question but I figure somebody else may have the same question.

    You know my 21 daycruiser with a YJ converted to a Dominator energizer kit.

    I notice earlier model boats with any kind of jet (Berk, Legend, AT etc), the water that comes out of the pump seems to be more streamlined especially when the diverter is all the way up. Where mine comes out a lot more messy and not as streamlined. What do you think the difference is and does it effect efficiency.

    Thanks Bud

    Mike
    Mike you have come up with a pretty good one. Again in all my years you are the first one that has an ugly rooster tail. Let me ask you , how does the boat run. Does it throw a large fan shape or does ot throw a firehose configuration. Do you feel the performance is hurt with this unique rooster tail?

  10. #8
    Junior Member Old Guy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    SW Michigan
    Posts
    20

    Default

    Has anybody designed a jet pump that draws air in to "lubricate" the water to reduce the drag. When I heard about submarines releasing compressed air at the very tip of the "nose" to flood the hull with tiny bubbles for increased speed, I wondered why the concept would not work with a jet pump. Once the water leaves the impeller all of the effort to direct the flow adds drag that requires power just to get rid of the water. Seems like tiny bubble "lube" would reduce the drag and enhance the efficiency of the pump. Is anybody doing it? Old

  11. #9
    "Need For Speed" Gearhead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Atlanta, Texas, United States
    Posts
    1,210

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Old Guy View Post
    Has anybody designed a jet pump that draws air in to "lubricate" the water to reduce the drag. When I heard about submarines releasing compressed air at the very tip of the "nose" to flood the hull with tiny bubbles for increased speed, I wondered why the concept would not work with a jet pump. Once the water leaves the impeller all of the effort to direct the flow adds drag that requires power just to get rid of the water. Seems like tiny bubble "lube" would reduce the drag and enhance the efficiency of the pump. Is anybody doing it? Old
    Old Guy,

    I think you are mixing apples and oranges here. It is one thing to introduce bubbles on the exterior of a hull, or a little chop on the water, to free up the hull, but introducing any bubbles within a pumping unit will cause cavatation and loss of efficiency and possible burning of the components. A pump operates most efficiently with a "solid" liquid.

  12. #10
    Junior Member Old Guy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    SW Michigan
    Posts
    20

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gearhead View Post
    Old Guy, I think you are mixing apples and oranges here. It is one thing to introduce bubbles on the exterior of a hull, or a little chop on the water, to free up the hull, but introducing any bubbles within a pumping unit will cause cavatation and loss of efficiency and possible burning of the components. A pump operates most efficiently with a "solid" liquid.
    Yes Gearhead, I clearly understand the cavitation issue. I'm thinking that air could be introduced at a point downstream (inside the pump) of a point where it would cause cavitation. Maybe it's not possible...........maybe it is possible. Air introduced anywhere (even at the nozzle) would reduce friction. Reduced friction = increased flow per hp. If I had more time and money, I would build it. I have a machine shop. Old

  13. #11
    "Need For Speed" Gearhead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Atlanta, Texas, United States
    Posts
    1,210

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Old Guy View Post
    Yes Gearhead, I clearly understand the cavitation issue. I'm thinking that air could be introduced at a point downstream (inside the pump) of a point where it would cause cavitation. Maybe it's not possible...........maybe it is possible. Air introduced anywhere (even at the nozzle) would reduce friction. Reduced friction = increased flow per hp. If I had more time and money, I would build it. I have a machine shop. Old
    An interesting concept.... I do know in a vane or rotary style pump, before, after or anywhere air is introduced in the system that it reduces effficiency and flow rate. I have machining equipment also, but think I will let you test the theory first
    Last edited by Gearhead; 06-14-2011 at 08:19 PM.

  14. #12
    Senior Member wizard612's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    121

    Default

    Air introduced into the pump is a net negative. Any air in the system will compress reducing thrust and turbulant air & water reduces efficiency. "Back in the day" we always tried to figure out where air was in the pump and eliminate it. Layout dye was sprayed throughout the pump to see where we were getting cavitation and we ground, filled and polished to reduce as much as we could. Your idea of introducing air further down the pump still would just add a compressible gas into a liquid that you're trying to keep as solid as possible given you're taking a limited amount of water and pushing it trough a relatively small hole with an ungodly about of horsepower. Also any increase in nozzel pressure restricts intake volume so adding anything downstream will still have issues upstream. If you want to reduce friction in the pump try to polish the inside better than the outside then speed cote it and buff. bet ya you will put a hundred hours in it and see little to no improvement anyway but it will keep you out of the bars for a few nights.

  15. #13
    Senior Member Mike D's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Anaheim/Aha
    Posts
    2,638

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wizard612 View Post
    Air introduced into the pump is a net negative. Any air in the system will compress reducing thrust and turbulant air & water reduces efficiency. "Back in the day" we always tried to figure out where air was in the pump and eliminate it. Layout dye was sprayed throughout the pump to see where we were getting cavitation and we ground, filled and polished to reduce as much as we could. Your idea of introducing air further down the pump still would just add a compressible gas into a liquid that you're trying to keep as solid as possible given you're taking a limited amount of water and pushing it trough a relatively small hole with an ungodly about of horsepower. Also any increase in nozzel pressure restricts intake volume so adding anything downstream will still have issues upstream. If you want to reduce friction in the pump try to polish the inside better than the outside then speed cote it and buff. bet ya you will put a hundred hours in it and see little to no improvement anyway but it will keep you out of the bars for a few nights.
    LMAO that is so true.

  16. #14
    Senior Member propless's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Clovis, Cali
    Posts
    623

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wizard612 View Post
    Air introduced into the pump is a net negative. Any air in the system will compress reducing thrust and turbulant air & water reduces efficiency. "Back in the day" we always tried to figure out where air was in the pump and eliminate it. Layout dye was sprayed throughout the pump to see where we were getting cavitation and we ground, filled and polished to reduce as much as we could. Your idea of introducing air further down the pump still would just add a compressible gas into a liquid that you're trying to keep as solid as possible given you're taking a limited amount of water and pushing it trough a relatively small hole with an ungodly about of horsepower. Also any increase in nozzel pressure restricts intake volume so adding anything downstream will still have issues upstream. If you want to reduce friction in the pump try to polish the inside better than the outside then speed cote it and buff. bet ya you will put a hundred hours in it and see little to no improvement anyway but it will keep you out of the bars for a few nights.
    Oh well, at least I'll know it looks pretty in there.

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Quick Reply Quick Reply

Register Now

Please enter the name by which you would like to log-in and be known on this site.

Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Please select your insurance company (Optional)

Log-in

Digg This Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may post new threads
  • You may post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95