Purpose of vanes in the bowl?
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Purpose of vanes in the bowl?

  1. #1
    Senior Member fastnlight's Avatar
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    Default Purpose of vanes in the bowl?

    I understand that the impeller is actually moving the water, but what is the purpose of the vanes in the bowl?

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    Senior Member 67weiman's Avatar
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    Not an expert but, I believe it is the dynamics of flow. Something like, it increases the velocity of the water flow. I really have no idea.

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    Senior Member fastnlight's Avatar
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    I'm thinking maybe it decreases turbulence.

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    Senior Member 67weiman's Avatar
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    Maybe, pretty sure it increases velocity as it directs the water in a spiral motion into a decreasing diameter exit.

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    Senior Member bp298's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fastnlight View Post
    I understand that the impeller is actually moving the water, but what is the purpose of the vanes in the bowl?
    the bowl vanes create what are known as volutes. the cross sectional area at the opening of each volute is slightly smaller than the exit. water exits the impeller at high velocity. as it travels through the volutes, velocity slows because the area enlarges. velocity energy converts to pressure energy through the volute. that is not to suggest that -all- velocity is converted to pressure energy. but this design is what allows the pump to create some decent pressure, while flowing a fairly decent volume. there are many variations to centrifugal pump design, but they are all based on the same concepts... accelerate water from the center outward, achieving a very high velocity, then convert that velocity to pressure by directing flow through a volute.

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    Senior Member 67weiman's Avatar
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    What Bob said.

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    Senior Member Boat 405's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bp298 View Post
    the bowl vanes create what are known as volutes. the cross sectional area at the opening of each volute is slightly smaller than the exit. water exits the impeller at high velocity. as it travels through the volutes, velocity slows because the area enlarges. velocity energy converts to pressure energy through the volute. that is not to suggest that -all- velocity is converted to pressure energy. but this design is what allows the pump to create some decent pressure, while flowing a fairly decent volume. there are many variations to centrifugal pump design, but they are all based on the same concepts... accelerate water from the center outward, achieving a very high velocity, then convert that velocity to pressure by directing flow through a volute.
    X2. Google "pump volute"
    Boat 405.

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    Senior Member fastnlight's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bp298 View Post
    the bowl vanes create what are known as volutes. the cross sectional area at the opening of each volute is slightly smaller than the exit. water exits the impeller at high velocity. as it travels through the volutes, velocity slows because the area enlarges. velocity energy converts to pressure energy through the volute. that is not to suggest that -all- velocity is converted to pressure energy. but this design is what allows the pump to create some decent pressure, while flowing a fairly decent volume. there are many variations to centrifugal pump design, but they are all based on the same concepts... accelerate water from the center outward, achieving a very high velocity, then convert that velocity to pressure by directing flow through a volute.
    Thanks for the input. I understand what a volute is in a centrifugal pump. I just need to see a cross section of a jet boat pump to visualize what is happening and can't find one. When I think of centrifugal pumps I think of fire pumps in buildings and on fire trucks. These pumps have blades on the impeller of which the outer edge creates the volute (space between the casing and impeller blades). The water leaves the pump casing and does not go to a bowl with vanes. It goes directly to a discharge gate or valve Why does a pump on a jet pump have vanes and a fire pump not have them? I'm not talking about the impeller blades. Is the bowl with the vanes a diffuser? I'll keep looking. This really bothering me. Does anyone have a cross section picture of a jet boat pump? Thanks.

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    Senior Member wpmxwb's Avatar
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    It's kinda hard to see the vanes but this might help.
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    Senior Member fastnlight's Avatar
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    Default 7 versus 9

    Quote Originally Posted by wpmxwb View Post
    It's kinda hard to see the vanes but this might help.
    Thanks. I know I asked for it but doesn't show what I talking about.
    Go to ARS Marine link below and look at a 9 vane Aggressor Bowl. See the
    nine vanes ? They do not move.(Unless I'm really jacked up. What the hell to do they do and what do they have to do with the volute? Correct me if I'm wrong but impeller blades are not the same as bowl vanes. One moves the other doesn't.

    Jet Pump Parts | Droop Snoots | Place Diverters | Impellers | Loaders

    Part two of my question: Stock Berk has 7 vanes; high performance bowl has 9. Why is nine better?
    Last edited by fastnlight; 04-09-2014 at 10:07 AM. Reason: typo: replaced "mine" with "nine"

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    Senior Member 67weiman's Avatar
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    Don't forget the 11 vane bowl

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    Senior Member wpmxwb's Avatar
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    The vanes on the impeller and bowl are facing opposite directions. The way I understand it is, the bowl vanes straighten the flow of water coming from the impeller vanes to substantially increase volume and pressure. Are you familiar with the internals of a torque converter? It could be related to the stator (without the one way clutch)

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    It's really no different than a turbocharger or a centrifugal compressor gas turbine.

    The water is accelerated and then diffused or voluted. LOL.
    If For Some Reason I Do Something Worthy Of Recognition. God Provided The Ability And Deserves The Credit.


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    Senior Member fastnlight's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wpmxwb View Post
    The vanes on the impeller and bowl are facing opposite directions. The way I understand it is, the bowl vanes straighten the flow of water coming from the impeller vanes to substantially increase volume and pressure. Are you familiar with the internals of a torque converter? It could be related to the stator (without the one way clutch)
    Oh Ok. Now where gettin somewhere It does have something to do with turbulance. In my googling this subject the word "diffuser" and "stator" came up. I'm vaguely familiar with how a torque converter works but will look it up. Thanks again!

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