Tip on mounting berkeley inlet
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Tip on mounting berkeley inlet

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    Default Tip on mounting berkeley inlet

    Hello,

    If you have a tip on mounting a berkeley pump inlet would you share? I have cut the hole in the hull, now just trying to do a "build up" around the inlet to get a good seal. (the pump inlet mating flange has up to a 1/2 inch gap as it sits in the hull. I assume fiberglass, but how have you performed the build-up of fiberglass to match the inlet metal?

    I was never good with clay as a kid and sculpting is not my thing - LOL.

    I figure I can just start laying mat, but getting a perfectly shaped surface will be tricky. Maybe wax paper on the pump inlet and stick it in place as it dries?

    tunnel ram boat/454

    thanks and respect. Frank

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    Senior Member Hass828's Avatar
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    Believe all of the pump guys use sea going epoxy for this. You can get it from REX
    Last edited by Hass828; 01-05-2011 at 06:10 AM.
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    B1 Racing cs19's Avatar
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    Epoxy is used to mount the intake in the boat, 1/2" gap is pretty big. Why is there a 1/2" gap? If that is the way it has to be you might build up the boat with glass so the gap is more like 3/16"-1/4".

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    Senior Member OkieDave's Avatar
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    Default is that all?

    isn't anybody going to talk about the angle, depth, biting edge of shoe, using the leveling bolts, ect?

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    Senior Member Hass828's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OkieDave View Post
    isn't anybody going to talk about the angle, depth, biting edge of shoe, using the leveling bolts, ect?
    Thats not what he asked
    "if we keep doing it the same way we always do..we will always get the same results"
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    Senior Member jetboatperformance's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank View Post
    Hello,

    If you have a tip on mounting a berkeley pump inlet would you share? I have cut the hole in the hull, now just trying to do a "build up" around the inlet to get a good seal. (the pump inlet mating flange has up to a 1/2 inch gap as it sits in the hull. I assume fiberglass, but how have you performed the build-up of fiberglass to match the inlet metal?

    I was never good with clay as a kid and sculpting is not my thing - LOL.

    I figure I can just start laying mat, but getting a perfectly shaped surface will be tricky. Maybe wax paper on the pump inlet and stick it in place as it dries?

    tunnel ram boat/454

    thanks and respect. Frank
    Frank although you probaly could do this with epoxy (make up the void) , epoxy has no structure , you may want to consider building thickness (where necceasary) by filling and thickening with laminating resin and glass mat to accomplish what you need , this is a "measure twice cut once" fit and check till the intake is exactly where you want it , dont be intimidated by the process its messy and itchy but pretty simple call we can help Tom


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    Copy all, thanks. will build with fiberglass/mat then final edge, use marine expoxy like bondo to help with straight edge. looks to be a challenge. as for gap, it's just the v-shape of the hull as compared to the fairly flat shape of the inlet. certainly I'll use a level edge and get it as close as possible before any majoy build-up. but...now I have to ask. pls enlighten me on "isn't anybody going to talk about the angle, depth, biting edge of shoe, using the leveling bolts, ect?"

    I've had mainly v-drives, and the few jets I've had did not require cutting the hull for pump installation. I went by berkeley's site for both inlet/outlet hole locations and seems to be right on the money as compared to their limited drawings.

    Mild boat, under 500 HP, 19' tunnel

    thanks and respect

    Frank

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    Senior Member jetboatperformance's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank View Post
    Copy all, thanks. will build with fiberglass/mat then final edge, use marine expoxy like bondo to help with straight edge. looks to be a challenge. as for gap, it's just the v-shape of the hull as compared to the fairly flat shape of the inlet. certainly I'll use a level edge and get it as close as possible before any majoy build-up. but...now I have to ask. pls enlighten me on "isn't anybody going to talk about the angle, depth, biting edge of shoe, using the leveling bolts, ect?"

    I've had mainly v-drives, and the few jets I've had did not require cutting the hull for pump installation. I went by berkeley's site for both inlet/outlet hole locations and seems to be right on the money as compared to their limited drawings.

    Mild boat, under 500 HP, 19' tunnel



    thanks and respect

    Frank
    The relative positioning of the intake to the boat botttom, keel etc is critical , you'll need a couple good long levels , a protractor/angle finder and a clean flat level place to work, if not done already you'll want to thread/tap the corners of your cleaned and prepared intake to use those 3/8 tapped holes for bolts as "leveling feet" to aid in propper positioning the intake application in the hull before epoxy application. Is your intake already equipt with a removable/adjustable shoe (intake rear lower radius area) or is it "as cast" ?



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    great advice thank you for your time! Really sweating "proper positioning the intake application in the hull” with it being a tunnel, I don't have easy straight stringers to go by. They are there but part of the tunnel support, and of course the top of the tunnel (deck) has the normal imperfections. I have spent many hours of late staring (with a beer) and trying to decide the best reference points to go by. I thought cutting the holes would be hard, but not really, berkeley's site is pretty straight fwd. Getting this intake aligned/angled/depth’d correctly is quite exasperating. Leveling bolts will certainly help. Sux knowing I’ll be eating a percentage of my horsepower if I don’t get this right. (I truly love doing this kind of thing, just wish I had done one before)

    any angle/depth advice?

    Thanks and respect. Frank

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    Living in a cage of fear thatguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jetboatperformance View Post
    The relative positioning of the intake to the boat botttom, keel etc is critical , you'll need a couple good long levels , a protractor/angle finder and a clean flat level place to work, if not done already you'll want to thread/tap the corners of your cleaned and prepared intake to use those 3/8 tapped holes for bolts as "leveling feet" to aid in propper positioning the intake application in the hull before epoxy application. Is your intake already equipt with a removable/adjustable shoe (intake rear lower radius area) or is it "as cast" ?



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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank View Post
    great advice thank you for your time! Really sweating "proper positioning the intake application in the hull” with it being a tunnel, I don't have easy straight stringers to go by. They are there but part of the tunnel support, and of course the top of the tunnel (deck) has the normal imperfections. I have spent many hours of late staring (with a beer) and trying to decide the best reference points to go by. I thought cutting the holes would be hard, but not really, berkeley's site is pretty straight fwd. Getting this intake aligned/angled/depth’d correctly is quite exasperating. Leveling bolts will certainly help. Sux knowing I’ll be eating a percentage of my horsepower if I don’t get this right. (I truly love doing this kind of thing, just wish I had done one before)

    any angle/depth advice?

    Thanks and respect. Frank
    Its not whats on the inside that counts, but the outside. Stringers don't matter, id pay close attention to the tunnels/keel and use them as your reference points. Before you start, id find what the recommended placement is for your brand of boat.
    P
    Also, if you don't already have a shoe on the intake, now may be a good time to research the function and benefits, especially with a performance oriented boat, and even more so if you are the kind of guy who likes speed.

    Edit- also, a half inch between the hull and intake on the front side, is no big deal i'll as long as the intake is set in the proper location.
    Last edited by Brendellajet; 01-08-2011 at 04:28 PM.
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    As for epoxy, DO NOT USE BONDO, sea going epoxy is what most use. I have used marine Tex works well. I've seen body filler used many times, it always seporates and leaks.
    Be safe, schick
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    give you application some thought first. if you want to run a shoe now or down the road the intake must be out of the boat to be machined for a shoe. easy to do now before installation. its nice to have a seasoned person to help on the first install.

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    All, thank you so much for your sage advice! Much appreciated! In no particular order:

    “…Its not whats on the inside that counts, but the outside. Stringers don't matter, id pay close attention to the tunnels/keel and use them as your reference points. …”

    - completely agree. I used the tunnels/keel when cutting the access holes. Will continue to do same, except leveling will be hard – will need some type of interior reference points. Still pondering this one. Even leveling the boat itself is a challenge. Fiberglass boats are just not straight! Chuckle!

    “..As for epoxy, DO NOT USE BONDO, sea going epoxy is what most use…”
    - absolutely. Marine epoxy for minor build up, wish I was better with fiberglass. Goal will be to build up as best possible with fiberglass, then marinetex for minor blemishes.


    “... its nice to have a seasoned person to help on the first install…”
    - I wish. But the process is just as important to me as the actual boating. Think I enjoy the boats more in the garage than the water. I like restoring/creating cars, boats and motorcycles. Just finished a 69 camaro for my son returning from Afghanistan. Not as good as a discovery channel show, but its 100 percent reliable, everything works, fast, damn good looking ..and no doubt will get him laid

    “…Also, if you don't already have a shoe on the intake, now may be a good time to research the function and benefits, especially with a performance oriented boat, and even more so if you are the kind of guy who likes speed….”

    - Shoot, how can you own a jet and not love speed (and showing off!) But I’m just not sure. This is a heavy tunnel and a mild 454, unsure of the benefits. May end up installing a stock setup with a vaiable nozzle to just see how she handles the water. Half the fun is experimenting for me – will enjoy taking apart and fine tuning down the road. I have yet to read a good article on shoes, can anyone point me to a thread or website? (that focuses on benefits/sizing – not sale)

    thanks and respect, frank
    Last edited by Frank; 01-10-2011 at 02:49 PM.

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