Daytona Wing Question
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Daytona Wing Question

  1. #1
    "Need For Speed" Gearhead's Avatar
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    Default Daytona Wing Question

    Originally Posted by cs19




    We've gone over this before but....What about this in a 130 MPH picklefork?


    What about wings? Is having the boat itself 10" off the trailing edge of the wing on a daytona hurting the wing? Never could figure out why guys mount their wings on their daytonas so far back, give the wing the best chance to work as possible. Move it forward...

    And anyone who has a wing on their daytona next time you drive your boat around pour some water on the wing and go for a cruise and watch the water, some weird stuff going on up there, pretty cool to see.

    Chris and Mike,

    Some time has now passed and I think you both have worked with wings. Do you mind sharing info on this subject at this time? At what e.t., speed, conditions or power would you reccomend a light weight boat of this style to run one? What have you observed in the handling?

    Basically, I am wondering at what point I may need to consider one in the reasonably light Daytona I am currently rigging. I'm an old head at boats, but have been out of the loop for a number of years and am just now learning about the Daytonas and Cheyennes, etc.

    Thanks,
    Gear
    Last edited by Gearhead; 01-09-2011 at 10:34 PM.

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  3. #2
    B1 Racing cs19's Avatar
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    Default

    Hi Gearhead. I think the wing deal is a good thing and they do work, personally I'd take a safe approach at some testing and see how she handles and go from there. If its a 380 lb. Eliminator with good HP you might as well get yourself a wing right away, your gonna need it. Engine placement and setup is everything and you can make it work with no wing but they do help on the faster boats like mid 8s and below. I found that when I got into the 120 mph range the wing was really a nice thing to have, at 135 its real important, atleast for me it is. Widowmaker and Declark both have experience with them and they both have light boats, Im sure they will post up here.

    Take care.

    Chris

    Quote Originally Posted by Gearhead View Post
    Chris and Mike,

    Some time has now passed and I think you both have worked with wings. Do you mind sharing info on this subject at this time? At what e.t., speed, conditions or power would you reccomend a light weight boat of this style to run one? What have you observed in the handling?

    Basically, I am wondering at what point I may need to consider one in the reasonably light Daytona I am currently rigging. I'm an old head at boats, but have been out of the loop for a number of years and am just now learning about the Daytonas and Cheyennes, etc.

    Thanks,
    Gear

  4. #3
    B1 Racing cs19's Avatar
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    One other thing is that the wings Olsen is currently making are a little different than the old ones Ive seen around like the one Im running, cant say what is best but after looking at airplane wings in google images it obvious why he changed them. The tops are much flatter on the newest wings. Top meaning side that faces up when installed on the boat, its actually the bottom since its upside down, hope that makes sence.
    Putting the pin in the boweye is a nightmare once you get a wing and they dent super easy but otherwise their are great

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  6. #4
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    Default Wing

    In the early days of the Daytona's we had a problem with a slow rate of climb as we lightened the boats up and started to make better power, nothing like today in terms of power. It was intended to give the driver an opportunity to get out of the throttle before the boat got to high. One of the Daytona's that ran BFJ ran a gyro contoled wing that as the attitude got above 2 degrees would automatically put more deflection in the wing. We are still learning more everytime we run the boats. We just did some testing between Christmas and New Years on setup which proved to be very intresting to say the least. Set up, motor placement, plate angle, nozzle angle nozzle size all still are the keys to making these tunnels work. One of the coolest things that we have at our finger tips is the ability to look at data on every pass we make which opens a whole new world on set up.

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