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Topic Review (Newest First)

  • 04-21-2013, 09:15 PM
    Gearhead
    Quote Originally Posted by ToMorrow44 View Post

    If I had to go to a tech school though, I would go to the School of Automotive Machinists (SAM). They get down and dirty with cylinder head porting and engine building focused on race engines. If I did that, I'd be looking at getting a job with one of the large NHRA race teams that do their own engine development.

    Good luck!
    -Tom
    Just to add: The SAM (in Houston area) school won the Engine Masters Challenge this year. Hands on real life engine development in the high performance market. The school runs a drag car as well. I noticed two young men with SAM shirts in our TAD pits at the NHRA Houston Regional race. I pulled them aside and congratulated them on the Engine Masters Challenge win. Turns out both of them were involved with the program and went to the challenge. I was impressed with the school experiences they shared.

    Gear
  • 04-21-2013, 08:53 PM
    Dean Corinth
    wow, thanks guys for all the information. like most of you have said, i do have to finish high school and then i think college might be the best bet for me. the only thing is that i am not sure what i would take. the local 2 year college offers a wide range of things, and im actually thinking of going to an adult school to expand some welding experience, and basic mechanics. although i am young, i do feel like i know what i want to do for a career. that is some sort of mechanical or basically anything hands on. My high school does offer "auto shop" the funny thing is, the "auto" would actually be a lawn mower, and the task assigned is to rebuild it successfully. that doesn't seem to hard, i personally think if i can build a full size engine, i can build a lawn mower engine. metal shop and wood shop are both good, and fun classes, and i do enjoy and am interested in both wood working, and fabrication. just wanted to say thanks and just give some more info on myself. haha. thanks---Dean
  • 04-01-2013, 09:54 AM
    Scapegoat
    I beg to differ. I've always wrench on most my own stuff no way would I have learned the technical aspect in ample time with out school. I'm years ahead of my colleagues. They have been doing this for twenty years and get schooled by me here and there. But I do agree that hands on is the other half of the equation. Knowledge and repetition is the key to success in this field. Add tools to that statement.
  • 03-31-2013, 01:24 PM
    ToMorrow44
    You might actually be better off skipping the technical school and working side by side with your dad or at a shop. You'll learn just as much, and it won't cost you an arm and a leg. Experience is everything, yes you can learn some basics at a tech school, but the real learning is hands on, diagnosing real problems, putting together real motors and tuning them...and most importantly: screwing stuff up! You'll learn far more from screwing stuff up and figuring out how to fix it than any tech school can teach you.

    Going to college and getting an engineering degree may not be what you're looking for. I have a degree in mechanical engineering, and they don't teach you much about building engines, working on cars, etc. Actually, in my case, none at all. They teach you the mathematics of designing equipment and parts and testing them. Lots of theory, calculations, and CAD design. Most of my classmates don't know how to operate a ratchet or change their own oil, it was actually pretty sad, and they have the same degree as I do. It sounds like you're more hands on and like to build things, I would stick with what you're doing. Now if you're good at math and like what I just described, then there's endless possibilities for you to be an engineer, companies are always looking for engineers and pay pretty well. You can always work on cars and boats in your free time, thats what I do.

    If I had to go to a tech school though, I would go to the School of Automotive Machinists (SAM). They get down and dirty with cylinder head porting and engine building focused on race engines. If I did that, I'd be looking at getting a job with one of the large NHRA race teams that do their own engine development.

    Good luck!
    -Tom
  • 03-28-2013, 09:17 PM
    jetboatperformance
    Quote Originally Posted by Dean Corinth View Post
    tom, my dad has had work done from you, you might know him by name, andy corinth. but unfortunately he is getting rid of all his boats and parts. in a way it has put me in a little depression, i walk into the garage everyday, and i see something is gone, or an open place here or there. i dont know what we are going to do, or what he is going to do for a new hobby. he says we might build a camaro or elcamino. that would be cool but i want him to keep some thing. i have a 455 olds to get machined and built up, that is of course, when i have money. oh well, Thank you for the advise and for all the info. Tom, you might recognize one of these boats.
    Hi Dean I do remember , Good to hear from you folks ! All Hot Rods are good Aquatic or otherwize Hang in there theres likley a Hot boat in your future Let us know if we can ever Help Tom
  • 03-28-2013, 09:03 PM
    Dean Corinth

    thank you

    tom, my dad has had work done from you, you might know him by name, andy corinth. but unfortunately he is getting rid of all his boats and parts. in a way it has put me in a little depression, i walk into the garage everyday, and i see something is gone, or an open place here or there. i dont know what we are going to do, or what he is going to do for a new hobby. he says we might build a camaro or elcamino. that would be cool but i want him to keep some thing. i have a 455 olds to get machined and built up, that is of course, when i have money. oh well, Thank you for the advise and for all the info. Tom, you might recognize one of these boats.
  • 12-11-2012, 08:22 PM
    jetboatperformance
    My Career spans over 40 years in the retail auto and marine business, I still own and operate an active auto industry related business along with JBP and deal with auto techs and mechanics daily , some of the best talent is from what I call "bird dog training" , find a benevolant expirenced veteran Mechanic or small shop owner and work along side him (or her) maybe your pops , as an apprentice or floor sweeper ,pay attention and ask questions he'll teach you invaluable skills ,tips tricks and more you'll never learn elsewhere. BTW My son who has worked with me since before high school is one of the very finest technicians I know , , and FWIW "you never stop learning", I now ask my self "how he would do this" daily he's become great "teacher" Tom

    BTW I've wanted to share this for a while , I got this email a while recently and 10 years after one of former my trainee techs (who came to me from a Walmart auto) left my employment I found it to be incredibly rewarding ...

    Hey Tom, John **** here. Remember me? I worked for you for about 3 years around 10 years ago. You said back then that I would hopefully have good memories of working for you at AAR. Well, you couldn't be more right. You and Josh were the coolest guys I ever worked with and we had a lot of fun too. I had no idea how tough it could be in this business. For a decade now, I've gotten what I deserved over and over. Everywhere I've worked has been a constant struggle to keep from getting my throat slit by my coworkers. So this is me saying, "ya told me so". I also wanted to let you know that I've somehow managed to scratch my way up to a service manager position that pays fairly well, and I owe my success to you. I knew absolutely nothing about auto repair when I started working for you. I learned more from you than I have from anyone since. I even learned business principles that I use in my current position. I obtained Master status, L1, Smog Lic, toyota hybrid cert., and several other lesser certs, like carquest and napa. Although I was such an asshole to you back then, I now realize that if it weren't for you, I would still be sweeping a floor somewhere. I had no trade or skills when I came to work for you. You gave me a solid mechanical foundation to build on. For that I thank you. John *****
  • 12-11-2012, 07:42 PM
    velomax
    I say work for your dad during your spare time, be the best shop boy ever and learn every thing that he'll teach you. After a few years maybe you'll have a little more direction.
  • 10-26-2012, 01:38 PM
    redlightrobert
    hey, i am an instructor at arizona automotive institute in phoenix, i also taught at marine mechanics institute in orlando fl. The tech school is a great way to get the basics, but as was said earlier, takes a lot of focus, but it looks like you already have that! if you have any questions about schools,( they are all good), pm me and i will get you my phone number and will be happy to talk to you about it!
  • 10-26-2012, 12:19 PM
    ptc
    Have a nephew that graduated from UTI (auto and diesel) and has done pretty well for himself, he is now managing a farm equipment facility in Ft. Worth Texas area and my daughters 'boyfriend' has just graduated from the Wyotech school here in W.SAC and is now working at a dealership.

    The vocational schools seem to get the knowledge part of it completed in a timely manner and provides everything you need, its just a matter of "experience" from there on. I know both UTI and Wyotech have specialty courses available also after completing the basic course too. And I agree with finding an employer FIRST that is willing to invest in you and getting them to reimburse you for school if possible!!!

    Good Luck, sounds like you have great ambition there and thats a great start!
  • 10-26-2012, 09:17 AM
    Scapegoat
    General auto, wyotec, uti, Lincoln,
    if you want to become specific look at reher Morrison, etc.
    when I change carreers from F&B director to automotive I went to UTI. Learned a lot and landed a job quick.
    I did the whole college thing, time consuming. Tech school took 17 months. But it require focas. Do your research, visit compasses and talk to previous students and employers in your area. Best option is to start communicating with a company you have desires to work for, let them know your intentions and try to set up a tuition reimbursement.. I did just that and plan to save $300 a month.
  • 10-25-2012, 09:46 PM
    67weiman
    15? Graduate high school FIRST! nothing wrong with playing with toys but, education first and foremost. After that, wyo tech is a great school! Seems you may Br getting ahead of yourself!
  • 10-25-2012, 09:05 PM
    rampgirlll
    I been trying to get my dad to send me to Rher Morrison school for years.
    Good luck in whatever you decide to do!


    Sent from somewhere in Texas!
  • 10-25-2012, 09:01 PM
    EVILFORCE
    WOW. You sound like you found your calling. I have a shop and have had 2 young guys work for me and they both went to Wyo-Tech. They were very good. But in all honesty I think you need to look at College. Good Luck.
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