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Topic Review (Newest First)

  • 10-31-2008, 09:15 PM
    HammerDown
    Quote Originally Posted by Schi-502 View Post
    ... Where's HJ on this thread?
    Schhhhhhh !
  • 10-31-2008, 06:17 PM
    Schi-502

    Some seriously good info...

    Duane, do I have to have a crate motor torn down or just broken in? Where's HJ on this thread?
  • 10-31-2008, 03:48 PM
    scott foxwell
    Quote Originally Posted by DuaneHTP View Post
    I've had good luck with the crate engines. I just put another new one in a boat today. Yes, it is nice to tear them down and build a professional engine and probably the better way to go if you have the money. The trick of making these engines work and last is mostly in the break in. We always break them in for the customer, (I spent almost two hours on the water with it today), and when the customer picks it up tomorrow, the rev limiter will be set on about 4300 rpm for the first 50 hours. Then you can run 'em.

    I have 2, 502/502 crate engines that we put Isky roller cams in and were tweaked on the dyno. We put them in a boat that was ran less than 10 hours. The customer decided he wanted a little more punch so we took them out and put the 720hp/572's in their place. Make me some offers Guys!
    Break in is one of those areas where there's way more "opinion" than fact. Fact is, if it won't run over 4300 in the first ten minutes, it won't make any difference in 50 hrs. "Proper" break in is put some heat in the engine and put a good load on it as soon as possible. With today's rings, it's broken in in about 30 min. The idea is to seat the rings ASAP. The longer it takes, the more you risk not seating them. After about 30 min, change the oil and filter and run it. Nothing else in the engine really needs "break in". The 50hrs you limit the engine is just 50hrs off it's life that no one is having any fun with. In extreme endurance race engines, life is measured in heat cycles...if that means anything to ya.
  • 10-31-2008, 11:28 AM
    SlowSquirt
    Quote Originally Posted by DuaneHTP View Post
    (I spent almost two hours on the water with it today),
    Man, life sure is rough for these guys!
  • 10-30-2008, 09:18 PM
    HammerDown
    Quote Originally Posted by DuaneHTP View Post
    ,,,The customer decided he wanted a little more punch so we took them out and put the 720hp/572's in their place...
    Backed down total timing for pump gas right?
    What was the other change...oil pan and maybe cam?
  • 10-30-2008, 09:14 PM
    konajet74
    Duane, when you were out for two hours breaking the motor in,
    what's the RIGHT procedure? I've heard many ways, I'd just
    like a professional answer..... Thanks
  • 10-30-2008, 08:26 PM
    DuaneHTP
    I've had good luck with the crate engines. I just put another new one in a boat today. Yes, it is nice to tear them down and build a professional engine and probably the better way to go if you have the money. The trick of making these engines work and last is mostly in the break in. We always break them in for the customer, (I spent almost two hours on the water with it today), and when the customer picks it up tomorrow, the rev limiter will be set on about 4300 rpm for the first 50 hours. Then you can run 'em.

    I have 2, 502/502 crate engines that we put Isky roller cams in and were tweaked on the dyno. We put them in a boat that was ran less than 10 hours. The customer decided he wanted a little more punch so we took them out and put the 720hp/572's in their place. Make me some offers Guys!
  • 10-30-2008, 06:35 PM
    Schi-502

    Want...

    I hadn't got that far. I live in NorCal. I'd be willing to test on water and entertain offers.
  • 10-30-2008, 05:20 PM
    thebeeter
    what do you want for the 502?
  • 10-30-2008, 04:25 PM
    Schi-502

    Exhaust upgrade is in the plans.

    Spoke with Greg S. this am. I'm making plans to take the boat to Corona!!!
  • 10-30-2008, 02:29 PM
    scott foxwell
    Quote Originally Posted by greg shoemaker View Post
    Chris, It's not the valve that is the problem the problem is the guide clearance.All of the heads are set up with an automotive spec on a closed cooling system.The guide clearance has to be opened up to atleast 1.5 thousandth's.This also applies to the Edlebrock cylinder head because they are the people that cast up the Chevy head. A severe duty valve is a good choice for a normally asperated engine and an inconel for a blown or nos engine.I know this first hand because the same thing has happened to me ,cooler cylinder head tight guide clearance means valve get stuck in the guide makes contact with the piston and then all hell breaks loose.
    What are the clearances to start? My guess is no two guides are the same.
  • 10-30-2008, 02:18 PM
    scott foxwell
    Any crate engine, IMO, needs to be torn down and at least inspected. The only way they can make any $ on these at the prices they sell them, is to do mass production, and buy parts in bulk. Bulk parts vary in quality from very good to just passing, and sometimes unusable. Mass production is just that, and leaves many opportunities for mistakes. I know there are plenty of successful installations of these engines, but there are enough horror stories that IMO, it's not worth taking the chance. Clearances need checking, machine finishes, cranks, rods, balance, heads, guides, etc. all need to be at least verified for correct. If anyone knows about these engines and the parts that go into them it's Chris, and he's right. Even if the guide clearances are set correctly, the valves are el cheapo. Likewise with the springs. Bore to piston clearances are most likely too tight for marine use (hot piston cold block syndrome) and I've heard the bearing clearances are tight, as well. The biggest complaint I've heard with these engines are oil pressure complaints. An oil pan upgrade should be in order as well. Re-assembled corectly, these should be good engines and give plenty of reliable service.
    JMO
    One more thing to add: If you're targeting a specific power requirement, it might be beneficial to flow the heads and get a specific cam ground. especially in a jet boat. NO doubt you'll be leaving power on the table if you don't. You're also compromising a lot of the potential of any engine you run with that ex system (that I see in your pics) Might consider an ex upgrade to compliment your engine upgrade.
  • 10-30-2008, 01:15 PM
    SlowSquirt
    Thanks for the feedback... the information regarding the head/valves was of particular interest.

    You have already experienced what happens when you put a car engine in a boat (ZZ502). A crate 572 is what, ~13k? A marine 572, ~30-40k? Clean up the gm 572, blow it up once, twice, three times? You may still be ahead of the game... I met in Steamboat running a 572 (low comp) in his Warlock... very clean and fast. He said he has >100 hours of hard run time without a hitch. Go w/closed cooling and you may be better yet (and keep all the crap out of the block!).

    Good luck.
  • 10-30-2008, 10:14 AM
    Schi-502

    Input

    not imput.
This thread has more than 14 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

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