I was thinking about buying a 1776 rifle (not musket) and I found this...
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I was thinking about buying a 1776 rifle (not musket) and I found this...

  1. #1
    Icy
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    Default I was thinking about buying a 1776 rifle (not musket) and I found this...

    I was thinking about buying a replica 1776 rifle (not musket) and I found this when I was searching through a website not mentioned here.

    A little history lesson I just learned myself. I knew we had rifles, but I did not know the British previously did not have rifles.

    ____

    Did you know that in 1776 Great Britain had to start making rifles (muskets with rifling) to compete with the arms some of the American Colonist's, not American Military, possessed?


    Did you know that the same people that had this advantage over the British, wrote the 2nd Amendment?

    From Wikipedia:


    Pattern 1776 Infantry Rifle


    Pattern 1776 rifle
    In January 1776, 1,000 rifles were ordered to be built for the British Army. A pattern by gunsmith William Grice, based on German rifles in use by the British Army, was approved for official issue as the Pattern 1776 Infantry Rifle. The barrel is 30.5" with hook breech in .62 calibre. Eight hundred were delivered through four Birmingham producers: William Grice, Mathias Barker, Galton & Sons and Bejamin Willets. Two hundred more were obtained from Hannover.
    This weapon was issued to the light company of each regiment in the British Army during the American Revolution; these were probably present at most battles in the conflict.


    British military rifles - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    As written by the website I was looking at:

    In January 1776, orders were sent to have 1000 rifles built for the British Army to confront the American Riflemen. This was the first British Rifle to be used in America. There were 800 of these that were delivered thru 4 Birmingham makers William Grice, Mathias Barker, Galton & Sons and Benjamin Willets. There were 200 more delivered from Hanover, Ernie Cowan believes that they have just identified one of these. It has a 3 leaf rear sight and Jaeger styling. This rifle is a much over looked weapon used all during the Revolutionary War. It has far more historical significance than even the Ferguson Rifle as it was probably present at most all the conflicts during the war. Thanks to the Late Kit Ravenshear and Herman Benninghoff we are now able to supply all the hardware for this rifle. It is brass mounted and has a very unique swivel ramrod arrangement. The barrel is 28.5" with hook breech in .62 caliber bore. In the book by DeWitt Bailey “British Rifles 1740-1840” he goes into great detail on this very famous rifle. The lock plate measures 5 3/4" x 1". The throw of the cock is 1 5/8". We also have the British Riflemans powder horn spout that was mounted on horns issued to rifleman before the Napoleonic Wars later in the section on English Arms.
    Last edited by Icy; 01-10-2013 at 02:57 AM.

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    Already miss the 310/562 2manymustangs's Avatar
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    Interesting, i have never heard that before...

    I have a friend that shoots competition in a few classes and his action of choice is the old rolling block... He has brand new guns built that cost several thousand dollars and use an action designed for the first rifle cartridge... Time tested design i suppose...

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Remington_Rolling_Block_rifle

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    Last edited by 2manymustangs; 01-10-2013 at 08:44 AM.
    Pat Eason, the voice of reason...

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    Icy
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    These weren't cartridges yet. Just muskets with rifiling. The spin gave the balls more stability so they had increased accuracy and farther range.

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    Already miss the 310/562 2manymustangs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Icy View Post
    These weren't cartridges yet. Just muskets with rifiling. The spin gave the balls more stability so they had increased accuracy and farther range.
    Yep....

    As was the case for the rifle that the Remington rolling block action was added to...
    Pat Eason, the voice of reason...

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    Senior Member EVILFORCE's Avatar
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    I shoot both Rolling Blocks and Sharps Rifles in Black Powder Silhouette competion.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EVILFORCE View Post
    I shoot both Rolling Blocks and Sharps Rifles in Black Powder Silhouette competion.


    Once upon a time I had a Browing B78 in 22-250 falling block and in 30-06 falling block BUT I sold all of my guns to a guy named Joe...

    The rolling block is a cool piece...
    Pat Eason, the voice of reason...

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