Public Employee Unions are Big Business
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread:
Public Employee Unions are Big Business

  1. #1
    "On the road again..." Old Texan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    South Texas
    Posts
    9,356

    Default Public Employee Unions are Big Business

    Conservative writer Linda Chavez puts a very real slant on Public Employee Unions like the WI teachers who are in revolt over cutbacks and reigning in the power of their unions. As she points out in the below excerpt, these situations allow the unions to effectively elect the politicians who as payback, allow give back wage increase and unsustainable benefits. Much like the programs the Congress "blesses" themselves with, they take care of the self interst group voting blocks who put them in office with plum deals the general public can't participate in, yet must finance.

    These types of unions have become big business and are in large part "breaking" America to sustain a small group of people. Controlling how they can stay in power and how they negoitiate contracts is a key to the recent happenings in WI. Chavez paints a true picture of what we are rally up against and how reform is needed. So far the general public is not viewing the issues as they should be as the facts and analysis aren't being reported objectively by mainstream media. Mandatory dues are used by the union and membership has no say in where that money goes as far as campaign contributions.

    The WI Gov wants to put and end to this absolute control and that is where the street p[rotestors are coming from, unipon halls and old line membership that have everything personal to lose. For them it's to hell with the average tax payer and all about their personal benefits negotiated inappropriately to enhance their stations and life after working.

    Is it right to US citizens as a whole?.......To me it's way out of copntrol, unfair to the general public, runaway union/political cronyism, unsustainable, and must be stopped.

    What is unique and dangerous about public employee unions is that they, in essence, elect their own bosses. Public employee unions put up big money to elect Democratic mayors, state legislators and governors. They then turn around and demand larger pensions, expensive health care, and hefty pay raises from the people they've elected to public office. And for decades, it worked -- which is how states like Wisconsin, Ohio, California, New York, New Jersey, and others have gotten into such fiscal trouble.
    The whole article:
    Union Backlash - Page 1 - Linda Chavez - Townhall Conservative



    For years, unions have waged war on the GOP, pouring hundred of millions of dollars each election cycle into defeating Republicans at the polls. It worked well for the unions so long as Democrats controlled most state houses and governors' offices, but with the 2010 election producing huge gains for Republicans, the chickens are coming home to roost.
    In Wisconsin, newly elected Gov. Scott Walker wants teachers in the state to start contributing to their pensions and pay a larger share of their health insurance costs to help close a $3.6 billion budget deficit. But he also wants to rein in the power of the unions by limiting their collective bargaining rights and the state's obligation to collect union dues.
    A similar battle is being waged in Ohio, where Republican Gov. John Kasich is facing an $8 billion deficit but also wants to limit public employee unions' power. In Wisconsin and Indiana, which also has a public employee bill pending, Democratic lawmakers have fled the state in order to avoid having to vote on legislation that would limit public employee union power. Meanwhile, thousands of demonstrators -- teachers as well as Democratic operatives on the left -- have crowded the state capitols in noisy protest.
    But the issue goes far beyond these states. Last year, public employee union members outnumbered those in the private sector for the first time in American history. While union membership continues to decline to a historic low -- less than 12 percent of workers overall belong to unions -- public employee union membership has been steadily growing. Public employee unions are now the driving force in the labor movement and represent 36 percent of all public employees in the nation.
    What is unique and dangerous about public employee unions is that they, in essence, elect their own bosses. Public employee unions put up big money to elect Democratic mayors, state legislators and governors. They then turn around and demand larger pensions, expensive health care, and hefty pay raises from the people they've elected to public office. And for decades, it worked -- which is how states like Wisconsin, Ohio, California, New York, New Jersey, and others have gotten into such fiscal trouble. Public employees receive a staggering 45 percent more, on average, in wages and benefits than comparable workers in the private sector. Public employees pay less for their health care and receive far more generous pensions, often without making contributions to them. Teachers, who are among the most heavily unionized public employees, also have tenure rights -- which make it difficult, if not impossible, to remove incompetent or underperforming teachers.

    Taxpayers pay for these higher wages and benefits. And who benefits? The public employees, of course, but also their unions. One of the most contentious features of Walker's proposal is to stop the state from collecting union dues and passing them on to the union. The unions are afraid that if the state doesn't deduct the dues from members' paychecks and turn them over to the union, the members won't pay up. The National Education Association alone will receive $358 million in its share of union dues nationally this school year -- virtually all of it taken automatically out of teachers' paychecks and turned over to the union by their government employer. Big Labor is a multi-billion dollar business.
    Walker also wants to give state employees the right to vote on whether they want to be represented by a union -- and if so, which one. But the unions don't like that either. They want workers to have the right to choose union representation, but they seem scared to death that the issue might actually be put to a vote every year. As it stands now, many current workers never had the right to choose whether or not they wanted union representation; the issue was decided years ago by people who may not even be working in the system now.
    The AFL-CIO spent more than $100 million last year to defeat Republican candidates. The American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees spent another $50 million and the NEA claimed it spent about $40 million, much of that money collected not as voluntary contributions but in mandatory union dues. Despite their profligate spending, those unions lost the election and now have to face the consequences. It's about time.
    "Bottle by bottle, I'm clearing off that shelf...."

  2. Remove Advertisements
    PerformanceBoats.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    1,512

    Default

    The item first discussed in most new contracts is the Security agreement. One would think this has to do with employee security. One would be wrong. The Security agreement has to do with the employer deducting dues from the members pay and passing it on to the union bosses. Who do you think the union is really looking out for?

    America is the land of equal opportunity, not equal success.
    “I predict future happiness for Americans if they can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of taking care of them.” .. Thomas Jefferson

  4. #3
    Living in a cage of fear thatguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Redding, CA
    Posts
    16,456

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fullup View Post
    The item first discussed in most new contracts is the Security agreement. One would think this has to do with employee security. One would be wrong. The Security agreement has to do with the employer deducting dues from the members pay and passing it on to the union bosses. Who do you think the union is really looking out for?
    That is exactly My experience when facing an attempted labor union infiltration of the drilling contractor I worked for in the 90's. (failed attempt, BTW)

    The VERY FIRST item discussed with management was the withholding of dues, PLUS back dues.

    However, in discussions with the work force, the representatives never mentioned it except when asked directly.

    From the outside looking in, it is very clear that unions are in effect 3rd party entities themselves.
    That becomes not so apparent when one has worked as a union member for a time, and is used to it.
    Tommy
    Quote Originally Posted by Rexone View Post
    Tommy please remove all Jimsplace quotes from your sig and don't put more back. He doesn't like it and it is against the rules. Thank you.
    "So as through a glass, and darkly
    The age long strife I see
    Where I fought in many guises,
    Many names, but always me."

    Gen. George S Patton

  5. #4
    "On the road again..." Old Texan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    South Texas
    Posts
    9,356

    Default

    I think a major point being addressed is the conflict of interest on how these unions control politicians to their advantage. The membership has no alternative but to join, they must contribute through payroll deduction, and have little if any say in how their funds are dispersed.

    Then many pols are effectively using union dues as personal slush funds under the guise of campaign contributions. A good deal of this money isn't even representative of how the "real" contributor wants his vote to go. This is a large out of control "racket" that falls into a number of categories including campign reform.

    With all the railing going on by some about "corporations", it will be intersteing to see how those same folks respond to what is essentially a form of "corporation", the "Union for Profit" who additionally are a political 'lobby" with tremendous power.

    The losers in all this are the typical US taxpayer who isn't affiliated with either big business or union lobbies. They just pay the bills after the fact. Some how in this country we have to find a way to take the rule making power out of the hands of politicians who have all this conflict of interest. And the power leaks over into the judicial sector where elected and appointed judges are additionally effected by the power brokers in control.
    "Bottle by bottle, I'm clearing off that shelf...."

  6. #5
    Impeachment! 75 TX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Culver City, Ca
    Posts
    3,728

    Default

    Public employee unions should be considered a criminal enterprise and shut down.

  7. #6
    Marine Organism Forkin' Crazy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Mound, Louisiana
    Posts
    12,743

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 75 TX View Post
    Public employee unions should be considered a criminal enterprise and shut down.
    Yes, I agree, and the “You scratch your back and I'll scratch your back” mentality needs to be dealt with as well.

    Much like said above referring to congress being able to vote itself benefits we need to address also. I don't ever think we'll see the day that congress will vote themselves a pay cut, no matter how responsible they play themselves to be. They are like self-deserving children with their hands in the cookie jar (our pockets). They are too immature to stop themselves.
    "An armed society is a polite society. Manners are good when one may have to back up his acts with his life"

    - - Robert A. Heinlein

+ Reply to Thread

Quick Reply Quick Reply

Register Now

Please enter the name by which you would like to log-in and be known on this site.

Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Please select your insurance company (Optional)

Log-in

Digg This Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may post new threads
  • You may post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95