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Some guy
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3,615 Posts
Please tell me that is not one of the only 6 in existence - magnesium single carb cast OLDS NHRA legal part number DRCE1 intakes sitting behind you to the photos right side.
And is that a Pontiac 386 15 degree to the left?
Oh, and that is a nice paint job on the block. Going with a real patina feel??? Or did you let your three year old finger paint it?
Sounds like a jealous brother to me!
 

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Some guy
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3,615 Posts
I've been using WD40 to clean cylinder bores...and a lot of other things...for a LONG time. It's a great solvent. Total Seal recommends it. WD, spray on blue Scott towels, wipe cylinders till clean, dry with Blue Scott towels, blow clean with air, Total Seal Quick Seat on the bores, barely a film thickness of Total Seal assy lube on teh rings before thtey go on the pistons and literally a couple drops of the TS assy lube on the skirts. I would never use assy lube on the cylinder walls. Totally defeats what we're trying to accomplish with ring break-in. I used to load my oil pump with the stuff and I don't even do that any more. I will say I don't know anything about the C&A lube. If it's specially formulated for ring break in, that's cool. If it's like the red stuff that everyone sells under different names, um, I wouldn't recommend using it on anything contacting cylinder walls. I will also say that I've learned the better the machining and the more "proper" the hone program is, the more straight and round the cylinders are, the less critical the cylinder prep and "break in" is.
Red rags are forbidden in my engine room. :((((((
This is a very quick vid from Total Seal. Not real technical, but simple;

Akerly and Childs, formerly Childs and Albert (I assume Paul's stock of cylinder lube is older than mine since it says C&A on it) packages a specific cylinder, piston, ring lube. As I had mentioned above it's a clear, light weight oil, nothing to do with red assembly lube. The label is pretty specific, about what it's to go on.

Somewhere back in the 90's I saw an Oberg filter opened on the dyno that had way more rag lint than I would have expected, so like you, no rags near the engine. Personal preference, I never really got to liking the blue ones.
 

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Just another Wannabe
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1,199 Posts
Rocky Childs was Childs and Albert. He hooked up to make a new company with the wiz, Ray Akerly. Many of Rocky's ideas from C&A became the ideas for A&C, with some new ones and experience from Ray. I love talking with Ray. That guy is no nonsense and knows the basic math to make power. He personifies "wisdom" when it comes to the simple parts of an engine. I love talking second ring tech with Ray. :D
 

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Village Idiot
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3,463 Posts
Discussion Starter #24
My kid is now FOUR thank you. He worked hard on that. I am sure it will look great just like that in a sexy runner bottom.

...and no it is not a mag DRCE intake. It is aluminum. Still very rare. And no they are not 386’s, they are 18* 427’s. Why don’t you pull your head out of your rear and polish your guitar. It looks like crap.

Brothers, I tell ya. lol

So, I was thinking about putting the front timing cover on after painting the block and heads (as I like painting iron heads when they are assembled and bolted on the block), but then remembered that it is harder to get a perfect zero on the balancer when the heads are bolted on. I like using a dial indicator on a piston. So that means that the timing cover is going on and the balancer will also go on. That way I can get the timing pointer perfect! Then I will bolt the heads on.

on a side note, I really like using a gen 6 stepped cam, cam thrust plate and timing set. It takes out the frustration of setting up a cam thrust button or bearing setup. Way easier! Every bbc I have touched has the bolt holes already there. Just order the cam with a stepped nose, get the correct cam thrust retainer plate and a good Gen 6 timing set and you are done. If running a water or fuel pump, you need a Gen 6 specific drive as the cam bolt pattern is smaller than the standard bolt patter. Other than that you are done. I have a feeling I will be going this route from now on when using regular timing chains.


Again, I am welcome to comments or ideas.

Paul
 

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Village Idiot
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3,463 Posts
Discussion Starter #25
Yes, the lube I have is the same formula, with the older companies name on it. It is specifically for Ring and cylinder lube. I put a small amount on the skits today before install. After turning it over a few times you can see a small amount on the cylinder walls, but nothing to write home about.

when it comes to lubes used during assembly, many guys have their own recipes they use for lubes and why. I like the redline (red assembly lube) on bearings as if it sits it does not get crusty, but is just a little thicker than normal oil. My bearings look good on tear down so I keep using it. I sometimes use clevite bearing guard lube on the bearings (depending on how I feel that day) instead on the mains and rods. Other than that, I use oil or that assembly lube on most everything else. On pushrod tips I often use just a touch of Isky rev lube (moly lube), but only use it there and sparingly.

Again, I am open to sharing thoughts and ideas. I am always willing to learn.

Paul
 

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Village Idiot
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3,463 Posts
Discussion Starter #26
Well today I got the front cover and balancer on. Here timing covers do not lend themselves to nice aftermarket timing pointers, so I had to get a little creative and hack up and machine one up to work on this cover. The other thing that drives me nuts is having just a point can mean that depending on the angle there can be a couple degree difference. So I welded a piece on the pointer giving a long sharp edge to make a clear defined point for reading the timing. It does not look like much progress was made today, but as I see it important progress was made.

Paul
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Village Idiot
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3,463 Posts
Discussion Starter #28 (Edited)
Well now that the piping pointer is perfect I was ready to put the heads on. I used a Teflon based thread sealer to seal the threads of the head studs going into the water passages. After being a pipe fitter for years I am a little particular as to which brand I use for each application. Sadly I can’t remember which one I use off the top of my head. I will get a picture next time I am at the shop. The only thing I do different is when using factory heads is I use head bolts on the short bolts under the headers. If you use head studs and use something like Bassett headers they can hit each other. If you grind the header flange it does not leave much to seal. By using a head bolt it leaves more room for headers. I use felpro 17046 head gaskets on this thing. It is a performance marine gasket for a Gen V block and heads. For marine stuff I like using copper coat on my head gaskets. Yes I know many guys don’t use it and have no issues, but I have not had a leaky head gasket when using it, so why change? I got the heads all torqued down and set and ready for some fun. Now depending on my painters availability it hopefully will get a nice coat of black paint and a nice coat of clear coat.

oh, don’t worry. Those bolts are coming out and it will get stainless Allen head bolts. That is just what the cover came with and it gives me time to figure out all the bolts I will need to do one trip to the bolt supply instead of multiple.
Paul
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Village Idiot
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3,463 Posts
Discussion Starter #29 (Edited)
So the compression ratio on my tightest chamber is 8.34 to 1. That is not including the crevice volume above the top ring land (which is quite a ways down). I did not measure that as I did not feel it was terribly important. Maybe I should have. I also need to double check the pistons as I think their dish volume might have been more than that (which would not break my heart. Either way, that is not bad for a modest blower engine. Being that the owner will be running av gas that will help give a little more safety margin. Again, that was on the smallest measured chamber which came out to 115. Cc. Most were closer to 119 cc. Those holes come out to 8.1 to 1 calculated. I am pretty happy with the numbers.

So the cam I stuck in this thing has 260/270 @ .050 and .685/.685” lift on a 112 LSA installed on a 108 ICL. It has a soft ramp to be easy on the valve springs And valvetrain components. Also to make life a little easier on everyone we had the cam ground on a core with a cast distributor gear. That way they don’t have to worry about using and wearing out and replacing bronze distributor gears. We are using Howard solid roller lifters as that is what was in the “never fired” engine. All the use they got was just when the engine was spun over. lol. The previous cam has the same lift and “should have the same base circle, so the push rods should be dang close as their geometry was right on the money. The pushrods are 080” wall 3/8” chromoly one piece pushrods. The springs are a Batten triple spring that is set up at 2.0” installed hight and is showing anywhere between 205# and 210 pounds depending on the individual installed height. I measured each spring and paired them based on the actual installed height of each valve. They are held with titanium retainers and steel 10* locks. Pleasantly some factory guide plates fit the best of all the ones we tried. (Not shocking being that these are factory heads). The valvetrain will be topped off with some stud girdles to keep everything secure. I like using stud girdles as it’s godo insurance on just about anything. Anything that has a solid roller in our shop gets them unless we are using shaft rockers. Even hydraulic rollers get them around here. I have never heard an issue from having too much strength. And spinning it all is a Rollermaster timing set with an Iwis chain. As stated before, we used a Gen 6 stepped nose cam core and timing set so we could use a thrust plate. That way we don’t have to worry about cam thrust issues at all. It is set and done! I have a feeling I will be doing this from now on. So much easier! One little thing I did was to put a plug in one of the front gallery plugs with a small hole to help oil the timing gear. The Gen V cam from the factory with both lifter galleries having small holes. I heard it was to lube the timing gear while also allowing the air to bleed out so the lifters did not tick long. Either way, I did not feel in was needed to release that much fluid so I only used one on the non distributor side. Anyway, that is enough for tonight. Now tomorrow is family time, so now real engine work for me.

Paul
 

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Premium Member
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1,838 Posts
Really cool Paul. Thanks for trying to jump start this place. I should be starting a mild 454 build soon for my Hallett cruiser. If I'm not too lazy I may start a thread on it here.
 

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Village Idiot
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3,463 Posts
Discussion Starter #32
This place is on life support at best. I can’t revive it, but for some guy that does a search down the road, I hope there are ideas that might make his life a little easier. Shan, shock the world and start a thread as well. How crazy would it be to have two active threads at once on this site. Crazy just to think about.

Paul
 

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Just Me
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4,056 Posts
I wouldn't say the patient is dead, just not as lively as it used to be. But good tech reading is always a plus. Keep on posting and see if the pulse rate will increase a little.
 

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This place is on life support at best. I can’t revive it, but for some guy that does a search down the road, I hope there are ideas that might make his life a little easier. Shan, shock the world and start a thread as well. How crazy would it be to have two active threads at once on this site. Crazy just to think about.

Paul
Yeah,no s***. Not the first post of, how someone didn't like how you did the rings,to start something that has helped kill the site. This kind of thread is refreshingly pleasant,PROCEED SIRS!!!!!;)
 

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Village Idiot
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3,463 Posts
Discussion Starter #35
Well I am happy that all posts (other than my brothers posts) have been educational and uplifting. Nobody knows it all. But we can and should share what we have learned. That is my thoughts anyway.
 

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153 Posts
I think that is very refreshing to see an active thread describing the ins and outs of a build. It reminds me of the old days, both on this board and the old Hotboat board before it, when there were so many of us actively sharing info and ideas. I built my blower deal almost exclusively on advice from guys on the boards. I only see a few of those names around anymore. Kind of sad...

Anyway, thanks for giving me something interesting to read! And I've even picked up a few tidbits to help me with my current blower project going in my son's boat.

(y)(y)(y)
 

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Village Idiot
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3,463 Posts
Discussion Starter #37
Glad you found something of value. That was the intent, and I owe much to the others who have shared. One person talking to himself starts to look like the crazy guy on the street. Thankfully a couple people with more experience than I also commented. Thanks for your thoughts and interest. Feel free to ask any questions or make comments.

Paul
 

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Great Build thread. Following it closely. Can you tell me the manufacturer and part number of that timing pointer? I run a lot of those style timing covers and finding a timing pointer that works with the tall/thick timing cover is near impossible. Thanks in advance.

Paul
 

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Village Idiot
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3,463 Posts
Discussion Starter #39
I don’t know the manufacturer of the pointer. It is one we had on an old engine. I hacked it up to make it work. If I had been smart and mocked everything up before hand It would have been a little different. Here is what I did. This timing pointer is like many on the market and did not fit this cover. I cut about a half inch off the mounting side to shorten it up a little. Then I cut out the area where the timing cover fins are tased up so it could sit flush. Since I had installed the balancer already and did not want remove it I had to get a little more creative. The bottom mounting bolt sits under the balancer and so I had to drill a different hole in he pointer and cover for a second mounting bolt. I cut where the bottom bolt goes though the timing pointer and needed to drill a new mounting hole. I put the pointer in in the drill press and drilled a hole in it. I then bolted the pointer with the upper bolt onto the cover and used the “small” hole I just drilled as a guide to drill the timing cover. I then tapped the timing cover for a 1/4 course thread bolt (the same as the timing cover bolts that go into the block) to hold the bottom part of the timing pointer. Being that the upper bolt hole had been machined a little below the polished area behind the balancer I had to use a thin stainless washer under the pointer there to make it sit flush. If I had a mill this would have been easy, but I don’t so it was all hacking with hand tools. Here is a slightly better picture. I will try to get a better picture. As for the actual pointer, I fired up the welder and used a piece of broken scissors as the extended pointer. That way there is no question what degree on the balancer it is pointing to. You just look down the edge of the pointer. If you are not looking down the edge it is easy to see when the timing light is lighting it up.
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Village Idiot
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3,463 Posts
Discussion Starter #40 (Edited)
That picture is before I welded on the extension. I just unbolted the adjustable piece and held it in the vice for welding. Looking back, trying to weld it was such a pain I would have been better off fabricating up a piece that bolted on there that did what I wanted. We learn from our experiences. On a side note, all the photos show the pointer off “zero”. Trust me, it is dead on. I set up a dial indicator on the center of the number one piston and kept it set up through the whole process.
 
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