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Hi Guys,

Does anyone know what the numbers stamped on the inside of the transom (just above the rudder) on a 1964 Stevens mean?

When I got the boat I was told it was a 1964 Sanger/Stevens, but the title reads manufacturer “Unknown.” Last spring I did some checking on this forum about how I could ID the make one way or another and got a lot of helpful information, which by the way was really cool J

One thing I learned was the older Stevens flatbottoms have an ID number stamped where I found the numbers 575 (you can see them in the pictures) inside the transom right above the rudder. The problem was the guy who I go the boat from had put carpet in the boat and I couldn’t see where they would be until I got everything stripped out.

Last spring, “defecation happened” and the project got delayed until now. Last night I was out scraping away old glue from the carpet, and low and behold there were the numbers I was looking for.

So, now that I know for sure it’s a Stevens, does anybody know what the numbers “575” mean? I am still looking for an ID plate on the stringers but no luck just yet. Still removing carpet. Is there a particular place I should be look?

My goal is top restore this boat back to prime hot rod condition over the winter, and launch it at the Antlers boat ramp on Shasta Lake Memorial Day 2013, to commemorate the 35[SUP]th[/SUP] anniversary of my uncles fatal boat crash near Antlers Resort in his Sanger in 1978.

Ooops, getting a little off track. Sorry about that. Any help with my Stevens make or model ID, or helpful information of any kind would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks guys, and have a great day!
Terry
 

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My 70 Stevens has the #2138 under the glass on the transom like yours. It is also on a metal tag attached to the passenger side stringer visable from the drivers seat. I don`t know how the Stevens factory did there numbering but another member here said his 70 Stevens was 2038?
 

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I have done a bit of researching for Stevens Boats for many years. I have collected a bit of info about the boats, and own a domain website for the boats as well, ( though I STILL haven't put the site up ) . Yours is the most asked question that I get. The answer is, as far as we can tell, the hull number is only a consecutive build number, and means nothing more. A 17' flatbottom may come out of the mold as 677, and the next boat 678 might be an outboard. There are a few records of a hull built one year with a LOWER number than a hull registered as built before. My guess is that these hulls may have been laid up, but not sold or built until a later date. This is just a guess, it's a question that I'd like to ask Mack and Mary Stevens, but they're both gone now, so we'll never really know why these things happened.
Stevens built a good, solid ski boat, and was very popular, but just like old VW Beetles, most boats of their era have been ill-maintained and thrashed . I'd like to see EVERY boat from the sixties restored, but if it was cheap and easy everyone would have one huh?
 

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I might be screwed

I have done a bit of researching for Stevens Boats for many years. I have collected a bit of info about the boats, and own a domain website for the boats as well, ( though I STILL haven't put the site up ) . Yours is the most asked question that I get. The answer is, as far as we can tell, the hull number is only a consecutive build number, and means nothing more. A 17' flatbottom may come out of the mold as 677, and the next boat 678 might be an outboard. There are a few records of a hull built one year with a LOWER number than a hull registered as built before. My guess is that these hulls may have been laid up, but not sold or built until a later date. This is just a guess, it's a question that I'd like to ask Mack and Mary Stevens, but they're both gone now, so we'll never really know why these things happened.
Stevens built a good, solid ski boat, and was very popular, but just like old VW Beetles, most boats of their era have been ill-maintained and thrashed . I'd like to see EVERY boat from the sixties restored, but if it was cheap and easy everyone would have one huh?
Thank you.

Cool information, very inreresting. I love this boat, but unfortunatley I wasn't very wise when I took on the project. I knew it had a dry rot issue in one of the stringers up front where the foot throtttle attaches, but I didn't figure it would have caused as much damage as it did. I've been stripping everything down to replace both stringers as part of the restoration, and last night found a little surprise....

Tomorrow I'll post some pictures, but it would appear as though my dry rot on driver side stringer has worked it's way through the entire stringer all the way back t the stern. Ouch! I should have looked closer but this is my first V-Drive project. I didn't really know what i was looking at when I bought it, and got so excited when I first saw the boat it might not have mattered anyway (if you know what I mean).

When I opened up the fiberglass around the stringer toward the stern all I found was dry rotted wood. Bad. The good news however is the floor (at least in that section) apprears to be sealed from water getting in. There is about a foot or so up front where I have some delamination, but I think it should be repairable. At least I hope so...

Does anyone have thought or experience on this? At what point do I need to face the fact and realize this vintage flat is beyond restoring? I love this boat, and don't want to give her up for the world. On the other hand, I also want to haul ass down the lake and still make it home safely :)

Like I said, I'll have some pictures up tomorrow.

Any words from the wise?

Thank you
Terry
 

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I can't give you any costs to do the work you talk about, I'm going to do new stringers in my 18' Stevens ski boat soon as well. Like i said, damn near every sixties boat has been ill- maintained. They weren't built with bad 'glass, their owner's weren't worthy, let water sit in them, left them outside, etc.
What I can tell you, is that these are no different than restoring a hot rod '32 Ford or '57 Chevy. It takes some time, money, but most of all , persistance along with effort. You may end up spending as much as buying a new boat ( have you priced a new boat lately? ),and maybe not, but you'll end up with something that is cooler than the others, and, if you chose to "restore" as it was, as opposed to modify, you can end up with a boat that appreciates in value. Do you think there's not ONE person on this site who wouldn't trade their modern " anyone can buy one" modern boat, for the restored Panic Mouse?

It's work, but It's fun, and you can do it a little bit at a time, then close the garage door and walk away. Buy a new boat ( try to find a new flatbottom or hydro for pleasure use these days ), and you will make a monthly payment on that boat, plus insurance, every month, even though you might use the thing only for two months a year, as your new boat depreciates in value. Few new boats fit in your garage, so there's the cost of a storage place every month too. My 18' flat fits in my garage. Just my take on it. I'm a restorer by nature, and biased that way.
 

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Thank you thank you thank you

I can't give you any costs to do the work you talk about, I'm going to do new stringers in my 18' Stevens ski boat soon as well. Like i said, damn near every sixties boat has been ill- maintained. They weren't built with bad 'glass, their owner's weren't worthy, let water sit in them, left them outside, etc.
What I can tell you, is that these are no different than restoring a hot rod '32 Ford or '57 Chevy. It takes some time, money, but most of all , persistance along with effort. You may end up spending as much as buying a new boat ( have you priced a new boat lately? ),and maybe not, but you'll end up with something that is cooler than the others, and, if you chose to "restore" as it was, as opposed to modify, you can end up with a boat that appreciates in value. Do you think there's not ONE person on this site who wouldn't trade their modern " anyone can buy one" modern boat, for the restored Panic Mouse?

It's work, but It's fun, and you can do it a little bit at a time, then close the garage door and walk away. Buy a new boat ( try to find a new flatbottom or hydro for pleasure use these days ), and you can make a monthly payment on that boat, plus insurance, every month, even though you might use the thing only for two months a year, as your new boat depreciates in value. Just my take on it. I'm a restorer by nature, and biased that way.
You are exactly right! Thanks for the encouragement, I feel more excited than ever! Regardless the cost or effort, what I'm getting out the other end will be priceless and classic. Both feet in, all systems go! Thanks again and have a great day!
 

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You are exactly right! Thanks for the encouragement, I feel more excited than ever! Regardless the cost or effort, what I'm getting out the other end will be priceless and classic. Both feet in, all systems go! Thanks again and have a great day!
Please post some photos when you can, all us Stevens guys can`t wait to see your progress!
 

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I bought a Stevens when it was only a bout 6 months old in 1970.
From my experience, even if there is some delamination in the floors it should be repairable. The bottom of those Stevens was thick and you could remove a lot of material and still have a strong bottom. Just use basic fiberglass techniques in repairing it and you should be fine.

Good luck.
 

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About this "hull numbers" thing. As you know by now, Stevens had their hull numbers hand written upside down on the inside of the transom, as far back as we can find, then, at some point, a data plate came into use, usually riveted to the driver's side stringer. I don't have enough registered boats in my records to make any sort of definative statement on exactly when this started. A viable guess would be sometime around when Mack and Mary sold the company to " some guy up north", as the late Bob Dean from Glenwood Marine told me. This happened sometime in the seventies, (when the company was sold ). We've seen the hull numbers moulded- in to the outside of transoms on newer boats, but never yet have seen moulded-in numbers on a Stevens hull, so I can assume that the Stevens Boat Co closed before this practice, ( law? )became common . It's impossible to date a boat by it's engine, due to the fact that, like hot rod cars, larger and newer engines will frequently replace the original power. Kind of a shame, really.
But, I'm into this stuff. I'd like to see them all brought back. They've been doing it for years with old hot rods and drag cars. Restoring sixties boats has been making some strides , gaining more and more momentum. Makes me happy.....
 

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Here we go.

About this "hull numbers" thing. As you know by now, Stevens had their hull numbers hand written upside down on the inside of the transom, as far back as we can find, then, at some point, a data plate came into use, usually riveted to the driver's side stringer. I don't have enough registered boats in my records to make any sort of definative statement on exactly when this started. A viable guess would be sometime around when Mack and Mary sold the company to " some guy up north", as the late Bob Dean from Glenwood Marine told me. This happened sometime in the seventies, (when the company was sold ). We've seen the hull numbers moulded- in to the outside of transoms on newer boats, but never yet have seen moulded-in numbers on a Stevens hull, so I can assume that the Stevens Boat Co closed before this practice, ( law? )became common . It's impossible to date a boat by it's engine, due to the fact that, like hot rod cars, larger and newer engines will frequently replace the original power. Kind of a shame, really.
But, I'm into this stuff. I'd like to see them all brought back. They've been doing it for years with old hot rods and drag cars. Restoring sixties boats has been making some strides , gaining more and more momentum. Makes me happy.....
Well, here we go. There is a lot of work here, but I'm keepin' my eye on the prize. Starting off with getting the carpet out so I can get to yhe part to even get started (if that makes sense). Not sure whty it had carpet in the first place, but I'm pretty darn sure it's not going back in....


Iv'e attached some photos of where we're at so far. This is gonna be a long haul, but's gonna be worth it. In the pictures you can see the the strnger situation. We still have to finish pulling the carpet but getting closer.


Is there a "best way" to pull those stringers? On the drivers side I'll problably just cut away the old fiberglass and clean out the dry rotted wood. I'm pretty good with my hands and with projest like this one, but I've never atually worked with fiberglass much less replced strigers in a flatty. Any advise from those who have will be closely listened to and greatly appreciated. THANKS!
 

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Bakerboy,
I think because this thread started out as "Stevens I.D. stamp", you may not be getting the answer you need. I'll bet If you open a new thread called "How do I repair my stringers", you'll get a handfull of guys who may know a thing about this, since the basics apply to any boat make, not just Stevens. Just a thought.
 
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