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What's the best way to treat the wood runners on a boat trailer?

I'm still diligently working on my '74 Rogers jet and while it seems I will never have it finished and lake ready, I am making progress and moving forward with it as best I can.
I decided it was a good time to pull the boat off of the trailer and do some work to it. After yanking the motor out, I lifted the hull and pulled the trailer out from under it. The hull is suspended by 2 over head hoists and I have a half dozen 50 series tires underneath it too.
Now on the trailer- I'm doing some welding/reinforcing in certain areas and now want to replace the wood runners that the boat sits on.
Yesterday I went to home depot and bought new wood and then went to my local upholstery shop and bought some marine carpet to cover it with,

Now my question....
What is the best way to treat this wood for longevity? The guy at Home depot didn't know. He said the water treatments they sell are not made to be submerged even for relatively short periods.
A friend at a marine shop told me to coat the lumber with fiberglass resin before I carpet it. This sounds like a good idea to me but, I wanted to ask anyone here who may have experience doing this.

What's the best way to treat the wood runners on a boat trailer?
thanks,
 

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What's the best way to treat the wood runners on a boat trailer?

I'm still diligently working on my '74 Rogers jet and while it seems I will never have it finished and lake ready, I am making progress and moving forward with it as best I can.
I decided it was a good time to pull the boat off of the trailer and do some work to it. After yanking the motor out, I lifted the hull and pulled the trailer out from under it. The hull is suspended by 2 over head hoists and I have a half dozen 50 series tires underneath it too.
Now on the trailer- I'm doing some welding/reinforcing in certain areas and now want to replace the wood runners that the boat sits on.
Yesterday I went to home depot and bought new wood and then went to my local upholstery shop and bought some marine carpet to cover it with,

Now my question....
What is the best way to treat this wood for longevity? The guy at Home depot didn't know. He said the water treatments they sell are not made to be submerged even for relatively short periods.
A friend at a marine shop told me to coat the lumber with fiberglass resin before I carpet it. This sounds like a good idea to me but, I wanted to ask anyone here who may have experience doing this.

What's the best way to treat the wood runners on a boat trailer?
thanks,
Hit em with some copper green clear, let em dry and cover with carpet, they'll last for 20+ years.

The biggest mistake everybody makes is trying to lag bolt them to the trailer....No good. Use galvanized carriage bolts and double nut them from the bottom, they will last virtually forever.

The fiberglass resin will not do squat IMO..Resin does very little without the strength of cloth or mat...;)

GT :)hand
 

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If you bought treated lumber, you will be pissing up a rope to even try and treat it. It has to dry out for quite some time before any treatment will soak in.

Ken
 

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Amber Racing Services
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Take the bunks and go down to Line X (or Rhino Liner or any other spray in truck liner place) and ask them to coat the wood. Then carpet them. When installing the lag bolts, pre-drill the holes and install them with a sealant / silicone.

Done. You'll never have to buy new wood again.
 

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Use Thompsons water seal on the wood if it is not water treated. Coat thouroghly with carpet glue and trrough bolt the bunks. You will sleep good knowing that you will have the wood outlast the carpet. Will you really have the boat for 20 more years? If so, you will probably go through the trailer redoing everything again by then.

Cy
 

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just a thought, but has anybody tried the 'synthetic wood' that is supposed to last a life time like used on the upper end decks? or maybe strips of the teflon that is used on the jet flea trailers i know that it can be had dimensionally like a 2x4 and carpet if you like , stuff seems to last forever on the fleas.
 

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About 500' AGL
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Take the bunks and go down to Line X (or Rhino Liner or any other spray in truck liner place) and ask them to coat the wood. Then carpet them. When installing the lag bolts, pre-drill the holes and install them with a sealant / silicone.

Done. You'll never have to buy new wood again.
This is how my bunks were done when the previous owner refirbished the trailer......they are very solid.
 

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just a thought, but has anybody tried the 'synthetic wood' that is supposed to last a life time like used on the upper end decks? or maybe strips of the teflon that is used on the jet flea trailers i know that it can be had dimensionally like a 2x4 and carpet if you like , stuff seems to last forever on the fleas.

The problem with that IMO,is there is no rigidity in the stuff at all, bends like wet cardboard, I think it would allow too much hull wave.

GT :)hand
 

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"Try it Now!"
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Take the bunks and go down to Line X (or Rhino Liner or any other spray in truck liner place) and ask them to coat the wood. Then carpet them. When installing the lag bolts, pre-drill the holes and install them with a sealant / silicone.

Done. You'll never have to buy new wood again.
Now that's thorough shyt right there! You mean you dont' just drill a larger hole, and put a larger bolt every time? I think a couple of mine are about 1" lag bolts now :( LOL.
 
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