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Other Side of River
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I always try to be out on the I40 at night,but today have to leave early,always think about is the wear and tear different in high heat,even when the engine is running at normal temp.Dumb ? i guess but something i think about.
 

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"The" masheenist
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If you ever spent any time on a dyno, atmospheric conditions DO matter to your engine.
 

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I usta say that about my former 7.3 diesel, until I was towing up the Needles grade with the boat in tow and Rhino in the bed. It was high noon and 117 outside, and I bet 130+ on the asphalt. I glanced at the temp gauge, and it was almost in the red. I have never had the temp needle move in all the years I towed, and I don't know why I looked at it, but I'm glad I did. Turned heater on ans slowed to 40, and it dropped right away. When it's wayyyy hot even a diesel will overheat.

Took it in, the cooling system was all OK according to Ford. I'm a guessing it was just too hot outside on that run.
 

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Boss of the McIntyre Mob
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With it that hot and dry, you loose power. So does your boat. If you still drive at 70, like you do when its 80* out, your are asking your motor to work harder. The harder your motor works, the more heat it puts out.

Just turn it back a little in the high heat.
 

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Premium Member
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I have a 2008 Chevy diesel with the Edge unit in it. The edge allows you to basically read the computer in real time because the edge is always plugged into the OBD2 port. The engine accounts for alot more then you would think like atmospheric pressure, ambient tiemp, etc. Yes the engine does know.
 

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Senior Expert
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249 Posts
I always try to be out on the I40 at night,but today have to leave early,always think about is the wear and tear different in high heat,even when the engine is running at normal temp.Dumb ? i guess but something i think about.

My $.02

Humans are much more sensative to slight changes in temperature, however newer vehicles are not. Even though you and I think it's hotter than @hit at the river and across I40 the car/truck is not hurting to much. Newer vehicles (within the last 20 years) come from the factory designed to operate at temperatures in the 190-195 degree range, this is what your thermestat opens at. Now if your cooling system is in good shape then it should be able to maintain this temperature even with an outside temperature of 115 degrees. Of course performance and power of the engine is going to suffer a little because the air going into the engine is not the ideal temperature and humidity. Cars from when my dad was young (I'm 37) used to over heat a lot and this was much more of a concern. Engines today expell most of their heat out the exhaust and the cooling capacity on most cars and trucks are very good. I have been going back and forth to the river for the last 20 years A LOT at all hours of the day and night and to be quite honest with you the last thing I think about is an over heated engine or how hot the poor truck is getting. I'm more concerned about getting a flat tire and having to change it in that heat.

Hope this helps.
 

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8anned
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4,041 Posts
Agreed. Changing a tire on the hot black top on the shoulder of HWY 40 sucks. I carry a large blanket for the dog to sleep on in the truck and its there in case I have to lay down on it. Floorjacks are great too!
I always have a floor jack and tire spinner for long trips with trailers. Last thing I want to do is use the factory supplied crap.
 

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210 degrees

My 09 gas engined Chevy 2500 runs at 210. Night, day, sunshine or rain, 210. Yes, the mileage IS affected when running up hill in 100+ temps. I have found better fuel economy by dropping to 5th gear, (I have 3.73:1 rear gears), and allowing a few more Rs to keep the engine loafing along instead of being loaded down up that Needles grade in 6th.........When "AIR" is harder to find, the modern computer controlled fuel systems pull back on fuel delivery. Less air, less fuel, = less POWER. It is almost on an even graph, drop percentage of available air, drop percentage of available power. This does NOT necessarily apply to "boost" assisted engines as you can pack in more air with turbo/blower. I'm just not sure how a computer can change boost while you're going down the road. A blower needs the pulleys, (overdrive ratio) changed mechanically......And still needs the fuel system dialed in to that change. Modern technology has changed a bunch since the days of overheating 50 Mercs and "Desert bags" hanging off the front bumper......Damn, I'm old......Ray
 

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I always have a floor jack and tire spinner for long trips with trailers. Last thing I want to do is use the factory supplied crap.

Agreed, those mini bottle jacks are junk. The tire spinners are too bulky so I keep a big socket wrench and a few different size deep sockets for all my trailers, and truck. I even have an onboard compressor and tank incase I need to air something up out there.
 

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Premium Member
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My 09 gas engined Chevy 2500 runs at 210. Night, day, sunshine or rain, 210. Yes, the mileage IS affected when running up hill in 100+ temps. I have found better fuel economy by dropping to 5th gear, (I have 3.73:1 rear gears), and allowing a few more Rs to keep the engine loafing along instead of being loaded down up that Needles grade in 6th.........When "AIR" is harder to find, the modern computer controlled fuel systems pull back on fuel delivery. Less air, less fuel, = less POWER. It is almost on an even graph, drop percentage of available air, drop percentage of available power. This does NOT necessarily apply to "boost" assisted engines as you can pack in more air with turbo/blower. I'm just not sure how a computer can change boost while you're going down the road. A blower needs the pulleys, (overdrive ratio) changed mechanically......And still needs the fuel system dialed in to that change. Modern technology has changed a bunch since the days of overheating 50 Mercs and "Desert bags" hanging off the front bumper......Damn, I'm old......Ray

One thing that I learned when I started using the Edge gauges was that our trucks do not run a 210* like the dash shows, they run at about 190* according to the OBD2 computer and my gauges are updated every 2 seconds about. It's kind of crazy how dumb the engineers at the auto companies think we are.
 

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Really?

One thing that I learned when I started using the Edge gauges was that our trucks do not run a 210* like the dash shows, they run at about 190* according to the OBD2 computer and my gauges are updated every 2 seconds about. It's kind of crazy how dumb the engineers at the auto companies think we are.
Really? You're saying the engineers purposely mis calibrate our temp gauges? If so, I feel better knowing the temp is actually lower. However, the gauge never moves after it come up to 210*, up or down........Ray
 

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Premium Member
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What I have found is through the Edge unit the gauge on the dash that shows 210* and hardly never moves is.....the average running temp of my truck (2008 Duramax) is 190. When I tow, I average about 200* in the summer according to the Edge. My truck according to my edge has never gotten above ~225* while towing up the steepest hills on the 40 in 100*+ ambient. I'm not going to speculate on how the engineers set up things because I don't know, I'm just posting my findings.
 

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Banne'd
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With it that hot and dry, you loose power. So does your boat. If you still drive at 70, like you do when its 80* out, your are asking your motor to work harder. The harder your motor works, the more heat it puts out.

Just turn it back a little in the high heat.

Thats no kidding. I pulled my 5th wheel home a couple of weeks back, 115 out. I hit one hill and just lost all power, temp hit 225 on the 6.0 gasser. I was down to 40 mph. The the fan comes on and the t stat is wide open, and then it cools down to 170. A minute or two latter it will settle down to it's normal 190. When it's cool out (80 or less)I can take that hill at 65 with no problem.

I was telling the owner of the storage lot about it. He said to get a "Colorado Chip", this chip will compensate for the thin air in the mountains. The engine will run better and cooler.
 
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