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In INTERNET REHAB
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have always had big dogs and for the most part they were very easy to train. Never liked the small yappy mutts, ESPECIALLY weiner dogs. Just have never seen a well disciplined one I guess. Anyway, I "rescued" a little female long haired weiner dog from the carnival. Was getting kicked around, running under the rides, scared half to death. No owner and one of the carnies said a mexican family dumped her a few days earlier.

I don't know much about the breed except that I don't like them. However, I do like her, she is a sweet little dog. Very loving and smart. BUT - and I'm sure this is why she was dumped..... she pee's when she gets excited, when she first see's you, when you pick her up, when she runs up to you - or anyone else for that matter. Its just a little bit, but enough to be an issue.

I'm actually getting attached to her and would like to keep her but don't know how to train her - or if its even something I can correct?

Any weiner guru's out there? :D Suggestions?
 

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Watch Cesar Millan.
 

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Desert Racing Widow
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You got Glenn's (HDD) number? He's got that kind of dog, at least 2 of the little sausages.
 

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She is probably so nervous and or happy to see you that she can't control it..

My buddy has one (Doxin) and she does that around new people but not all the time...

This is actually a perfect question for a veterinarian.

GT :)hand
 

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Marine Organism
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Nothing that I know of except to find her a good home BEFORE you get attached! ;)
 

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Box Pimp
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To understand why your dog is doing this, it helps to understand dominance and submissiveness in the dog world. In a situation where overly sensitive dogs may feel intimidated and excited their response is to urinate to show that they recognize the other person or dogs dominance. It’s very common for this to happen during greetings. It’s VERY important to understand that punishment will only make the situation worse and they are not doing it on purpose or out of spite. In their dog world this is proper behavior. But, because they are living in our world we understandably want to change the behavior.

First and foremost you should always make sure that your Vet rules out all physical problems. After that, you can move onto learning how to control the behavior. For submissive dogs, positive reinforcement for good behavior is very important to build their confidence. I would suggest an obedience plan that uses treats, favorite toys and other positive motivators for this type of dog.

Since greetings are the main culprit, there are things you can do to solve the problem as well. Upon arrival, both you and guests should actually ignore her for the first few minutes to minimize the excitement, which leads to the urination. Walk in calmly, with no eye contact and no petting for the first five to 10 minutes. Just walk past her and act as though she is not even there. After the excitement of the arrival has ended you can acknowledge her in a calm way. When you do pet her, don’t stand over her, as this is a sign of dominance, just sit calmly and let her come next to you. Ask all guests to do the same. Over time, your dog will not get so overwhelmed with the greetings and the behavior should be controlled. Make sure you are exercising your dog regularly and having her relieve herself often, especially before you are expecting guests.

It will take a few changes but I am confident you’ll be happy with the results and a clean house again! You and your dog will be happier!
 

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To understand why your dog is doing this, it helps to understand dominance and submissiveness in the dog world. In a situation where overly sensitive dogs may feel intimidated and excited their response is to urinate to show that they recognize the other person or dogs dominance. It’s very common for this to happen during greetings. It’s VERY important to understand that punishment will only make the situation worse and they are not doing it on purpose or out of spite. In their dog world this is proper behavior. But, because they are living in our world we understandably want to change the behavior.

First and foremost you should always make sure that your Vet rules out all physical problems. After that, you can move onto learning how to control the behavior. For submissive dogs, positive reinforcement for good behavior is very important to build their confidence. I would suggest an obedience plan that uses treats, favorite toys and other positive motivators for this type of dog.

Since greetings are the main culprit, there are things you can do to solve the problem as well. Upon arrival, both you and guests should actually ignore her for the first few minutes to minimize the excitement, which leads to the urination. Walk in calmly, with no eye contact and no petting for the first five to 10 minutes. Just walk past her and act as though she is not even there. After the excitement of the arrival has ended you can acknowledge her in a calm way. When you do pet her, don’t stand over her, as this is a sign of dominance, just sit calmly and let her come next to you. Ask all guests to do the same. Over time, your dog will not get so overwhelmed with the greetings and the behavior should be controlled. Make sure you are exercising your dog regularly and having her relieve herself often, especially before you are expecting guests.

It will take a few changes but I am confident you’ll be happy with the results and a clean house again! You and your dog will be happier!
www.webdogtrainer.com :p
 

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In INTERNET REHAB
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
You got Glenn's (HDD) number? He's got that kind of dog, at least 2 of the little sausages.
Nope. Paging HDD............ :D

She is probably so nervous and or happy to see you that she can't control it..

My buddy has one (Doxin) and she does that around new people but not all the time...

This is actually a perfect question for a veterinarian.

GT :)hand
Good idea, I'll give my vet a call in the am.


Since greetings are the main culprit, there are things you can do to solve the problem as well. Upon arrival, both you and guests should actually ignore her for the first few minutes to minimize the excitement, which leads to the urination. Walk in calmly, with no eye contact and no petting for the first five to 10 minutes.


Thanks Matt - I actually tried this but it isn't really working. She excites so easily that she just can't help it. I crate her at night and she is fine but as soon as she see's me :D . She rolls over on her back alot and is veryyyy submissive. Is that normal for these dogs too? I just figured that she was scared, new enviroment etc but its been about 2 weeks now and no improvement.

EDIT, Hi JEN! ;)
 

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Nope. Paging HDD............ :D


Good idea, I'll give my vet a call in the am.



Thanks Matt - I actually tried this but it isn't really working. She excites so easily that she just can't help it. I crate her at night and she is fine but as soon as she see's me :D . She rolls over on her back alot and is veryyyy submissive. Is that normal for these dogs too? I just figured that she was scared, new enviroment etc but its been about 2 weeks now and no improvement.

EDIT, Hi JEN! ;)
How about walking to the back door and opening it. Sit in a chair and wait for her to come outside for the greeting.
 

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I'm baaaaack...
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Walk outside, call her out, then ignore her a bit, maybe go to the lawn. Call her over, then pet her. It took a long time to get Abbie trained to not pee when greeting. We used the outside on lawn method to keep it out of the house. She eventually grew out of it. Now she thinks she's the boss, all eleven pounds of her.
 

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Since greetings are the main culprit, there are things you can do to solve the problem as well. Upon arrival, both you and guests should actually ignore her for the first few minutes to minimize the excitement, which leads to the urination. Walk in calmly, with no eye contact and no petting for the first five to 10 minutes. Just walk past her and act as though she is not even there. After the excitement of the arrival has ended you can acknowledge her in a calm way. When you do pet her, don’t stand over her, as this is a sign of dominance, just sit calmly and let her come next to you. Ask all guests to do the same. Over time, your dog will not get so overwhelmed with the greetings and the behavior should be controlled. Make sure you are exercising your dog regularly and having her relieve herself often, especially before you are expecting guests.
This is what we did for our pug/terrier. Give it time it will work.
 

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How about walking to the back door and opening it. Sit in a chair and wait for her to come outside for the greeting.
Do the above and repeat "go potty" until she goes, then reward her. If you play it right, you can teach her to go on command and that might solve your problem.:)
 

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Living in a cage of fear
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My sister rescued one of these from a very abusive home years ago.
Hansi was about 2 YO at the time. He was kept in a closet and taken out only to be tortured by the young children at that home.

He spent several days at the Vet getting tuned up, and it took a full year for him to be able to chill easily at our house. He turned out to be a GREAT little dog. He was about 15 when we put him down. Went blind and then organs started failing.
He was quite a little character! Would sit up on his haunches for french fries and treats. Dog loved McDonalds' fries, but would not eat BK fries!

If you can invest the time, you will not be dissapointed with this breed.
Hansi was very cool, although he NEVER did get over his hatred of small children. He learned to tolerate them, but you could not trust him alone with them, due to his early years of torture.

After what your pooch suffered, it is understandable that she is excited to see you. It will pass with some outside greeting training as well as time.
 

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In INTERNET REHAB
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks everyone, here are some pics of her. Is she even a wienie dog? I just assumed. Any guesses on how old?



 

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Slum Lord
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Doesn't look like a dachshund to me either................
Did you try speaking spanish to her? She might understand your commands mucho bettero :p
She is kinda cute though ;)
 

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I have always had big dogs and for the most part they were very easy to train. Never liked the small yappy mutts, ESPECIALLY weiner dogs. Just have never seen a well disciplined one I guess. Anyway, I "rescued" a little female long haired weiner dog from the carnival. Was getting kicked around, running under the rides, scared half to death. No owner and one of the carnies said a mexican family dumped her a few days earlier.

I don't know much about the breed except that I don't like them. However, I do like her, she is a sweet little dog. Very loving and smart. BUT - and I'm sure this is why she was dumped..... she pee's when she gets excited, when she first see's you, when you pick her up, when she runs up to you - or anyone else for that matter. Its just a little bit, but enough to be an issue.

I'm actually getting attached to her and would like to keep her but don't know how to train her - or if its even something I can correct?

Any weiner guru's out there? :D Suggestions?
only dogs i/we have ever had;)they need love(lots of it)treats(lots of them) and toys(lots of them):Dour dogs are ROTTON:D,ps they all pee when excited:D:)sphss
 
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