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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
They don't carry diesel!!!! I picked up a new truck and went over to Exxon Mobil to fill up because that's where my company gas card is and no diesel. I figured I would just go to the one by my house, no diesel WTF. So I looked on line to the station locator and it says that theres one in Fontana about 10 miles from my office stopped in there while I was out that way and the web site lied. So I guess I will have to start paying for my gas and putting company gas in my wifes car.:|err:|err
 

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Welcome to the world of diesel. Some areas are just hard to find it.
 

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The scumbags still haven't paid for the Valdez oil spill. :|err I haven't set foot on any of their gas stations in 20 years.
 

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Living in a cage of fear
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The scumbags still haven't paid for the Valdez oil spill. :|err I haven't set foot on any of their gas stations in 20 years.
Oh My God! How ignorant are You???

I lived there when it happened, lived there until 2000 in fact (30 years).

Exxon has paid a total of 3.4 Billion Dollars as of 2008.
If you break away from the tree hugger mentality and look at what really resulted from that spill, you will see that, financially speaking, it was a HUGE windfall for virtually every fisherman, laborer, and boat owner in South Central AK.
I had buddies that literally made a million dollars in 6 months.

Yes, it was ABSOLUTELY an environmental disaster of EPIC proportions.
And Captain Joe was ABSOLUTELY criminal in his actions.
Immediate harm to fish and wild life was REAL and brutal, but all in all, not very long lived proportional to the disaster and amount spilled.
But Exxon started throwing money at it the minute it happened. Before any court orders.
The so called fisherman that still pursue claims are the deadbeats who made nothing before the spill. I was there and saw it first hand.
Exxon, and the conglomerate "Alyeska Pipeline" have allowed thousands of people to live very good lives through out the state.

These companies have no desire to shit where they sleep, so to speak.
They paid laborers $20.00 - $40.00 an hour to "Hotsy" rocks and shoreline in what was pretty much a wasted effort, considering Mother Natures ability to disperse and clean. Do you know that that inlet has the 2nd highest tide change in the world? Up to 32' on average? Do you know what the water current speed is exchanging THAT much water twice a day? Generally, We Halibut fish with up to 36 oz. of lead just to hit bottom in around 300'. Point is nature took care of it much faster and thoroughly than any human effort could have.

The amount of cash Exxon spent BEFORE the fines is STAGGERING.
You will be hard pressed to find ANYONE who actually lived there saying anything bad about Exxon. The only ones who do are the ones too lazy to capitalize on it at the time (IE: work as a "rock polisher") or scumbag lawyers still looking for a cash cow.
Ma nature had it cleaned up rather quickly, in spite what your Greenie stats may say. And the populace scored big, and the fishery was restored by Nature within 1-2 yeas.

This is one of those times when you shouldn't speak about what you know nothing about at all, except what you see on greenie commercials. (I think that damned duck has been scrubbed about a million times by now)

Something else you may not be aware of.....You buy Exxon fuel all the time.
Exxon/ Mobile stations are not the only stations Exxon sells at. I mean, being the worlds 2nd largest producer and all..........
 

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Dreaming of snow
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After a while you will start memmorizing where the diesel stations are. Im on my 3rd diesel, and I can pretty much plan my trips by where I am going to stop for gas. Also know that when driving down the freeway, you can almost always find diesel at a 76 if you see one.
 

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Living in a cage of fear
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How dare you confulude this post with facts and such.....:D:D
My Bad!

After a while you will start memmorizing where the diesel stations are. Im on my 3rd diesel, and I can pretty much plan my trips by where I am going to stop for gas. Also know that when driving down the freeway, you can almost always find diesel at a 76 if you see one.
Yeah, I do the same thing. Every cross country route I take has certain stops planned for fuel availability.
 

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Oh My God! How ignorant are You???

I lived there when it happened, lived there until 2000 in fact (30 years).

Exxon has paid a total of 3.4 Billion Dollars as of 2008.
If you break away from the tree hugger mentality and look at what really resulted from that spill, you will see that, financially speaking, it was a HUGE windfall for virtually every fisherman, laborer, and boat owner in South Central AK.
I had buddies that literally made a million dollars in 6 months.

Yes, it was ABSOLUTELY an environmental disaster of EPIC proportions.
And Captain Joe was ABSOLUTELY criminal in his actions.
Immediate harm to fish and wild life was REAL and brutal, but all in all, not very long lived proportional to the disaster and amount spilled.
But Exxon started throwing money at it the minute it happened. Before any court orders.
The so called fisherman that still pursue claims are the deadbeats who made nothing before the spill. I was there and saw it first hand.
Exxon, and the conglomerate "Alyeska Pipeline" have allowed thousands of people to live very good lives through out the state.

These companies have no desire to shit where they sleep, so to speak.
They paid laborers $20.00 - $40.00 an hour to "Hotsy" rocks and shoreline in what was pretty much a wasted effort, considering Mother Natures ability to disperse and clean. Do you know that that inlet has the 2nd highest tide change in the world? Up to 32' on average? Do you know what the water current speed is exchanging THAT much water twice a day? Generally, We Halibut fish with up to 36 oz. of lead just to hit bottom in around 300'. Point is nature took care of it much faster and thoroughly than any human effort could have.

The amount of cash Exxon spent BEFORE the fines is STAGGERING.
You will be hard pressed to find ANYONE who actually lived there saying anything bad about Exxon. The only ones who do are the ones too lazy to capitalize on it at the time (IE: work as a "rock polisher") or scumbag lawyers still looking for a cash cow.
Ma nature had it cleaned up rather quickly, in spite what your Greenie stats may say. And the populace scored big, and the fishery was restored by Nature within 1-2 yeas.

This is one of those times when you shouldn't speak about what you know nothing about at all, except what you see on greenie commercials. (I think that damned duck has been scrubbed about a million times by now)

Something else you may not be aware of.....You buy Exxon fuel all the time.
Exxon/ Mobile stations are not the only stations Exxon sells at. I mean, being the worlds 2nd largest producer and all..........
You forgot about the 100K dollar otter that became dinner for one killer whale.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
After a while you will start memmorizing where the diesel stations are. Im on my 3rd diesel, and I can pretty much plan my trips by where I am going to stop for gas. Also know that when driving down the freeway, you can almost always find diesel at a 76 if you see one.
Yeah I know where most of the stations are around my gripe is that I can't get it at Exxon/Mobil which is where I have a company gas card so I'm stuck paying for it myself.
 

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Yeah, I do the same thing. Every cross country route I take has certain stops planned for fuel availability.

Then again, you can do what I did.. Had a shop out of Havasu (KSH Marine) build me a fuel tank/tool box combo and powercoat it to match the truck. They installed a transfer pump and waaaalaaaa... an extra 60 gallons of diesel.

Between that and the 38 gallon tank for the main tank, I can be pretty selective about where I stop for diesel. It also is nice to only have to fill up once a month.
 

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Yeah I know where most of the stations are around my gripe is that I can't get it at Exxon/Mobil which is where I have a company gas card so I'm stuck paying for it myself.
There's one here in Rancho! Guess you'll have to fill up after each REIGN game !!! :)sphss
 

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Yeah I know where most of the stations are around my gripe is that I can't get it at Exxon/Mobil which is where I have a company gas card so I'm stuck paying for it myself.
Get a company visa or mc and you can buy diesel at any station you want. I don't even use oil co cc's any longer.
 

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Living in a cage of fear
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You forgot about the 100K dollar otter that became dinner for one killer whale.
You mean an "appetizer"!

I didn't forget, just figured it might have been too much for 'litter to grasp all at once......

Rex is right, if you can get a MC or Visa, problem solved.
I have a Chevron card that I use for my business fuel, but I end up using my bank business debit card more often than not.
 

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Dreaming of snow
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Yeah I know where most of the stations are around my gripe is that I can't get it at Exxon/Mobil which is where I have a company gas card so I'm stuck paying for it myself.

If you are ever out towards Rancho area, there are several by me that carry diesel.

Two at Ontario Mills (one off 4th and 15 and other at 10 and milliken)
One on Haven, just north of foothill
One on Arrow and Hermosa.

Im not sure about the rest of the Mobil's, but these ones do. Might be worth a 20 minute drive to save $80?
 

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it was a HUGE windfall for virtually every fisherman, laborer, and boat owner in South Central AK.
I had buddies that literally made a million dollars in 6 months. No Guy


Orly??

(CBS) John Platt - a fisherman from Cordova, Alaska - made a pretty penny in the good old days. That was back in the 80's when an Alaskan fisherman could work hard and make a good living.

That was then. This is now. "My current financial situation is terrible," Platt says, "It's terrible."

He still earns his living fishing. But today Platt is deep in dept. He's waiting on a check he will never cash.

"My net worth is negative right now," he says. "Negative."

Platt is one of the 32,000 original plaintiffs in a lawsuit against corporate giant Exxon Mobil following the Exxon Valdez oil spill in 1989, reports CBS News chief national correspondent Byron Pitts.

Eleven million gallons of oil spilled along 1,300 miles of Alaskan coastline. The fishing industry was devastated. It was the worse disaster of its kind in U.S. history.

Back in 1989, Exxon executives, including Don Cornett, promised to take care of everyone affected by the spill.

“You have my word we will make you whole again," he said at the time.

In 1989, fishermen like Platt were hired to help clean up the spill. He made nearly $600,000 that year.

In total, Exxon spent more than $3.8 billion in clean up costs, fines and compensation. But in 1994, an Anchorage jury found Exxon acted recklessly and awarded victims of the spill $5 billion in punitive damages. An appeals court later cut that award in half.

But after nearly 15 years in appeals, the case finally reached the U.S. Supreme Court last year. The justices reduced that $2.5 billion in punitive damages to just more than $507 million.

Platt's share of the settlement is expected to be close to $400,000. But he still owes the state of Alaska $600,000 for his commercial fishing licenses. So his check will go straight to the state. But here's the kicker: he has to pay the taxes on it.

"A lot of people aren't going to make it," warns Platt.

At least 6,000 of the original plaintiffs have died, and 8,000 plaintiffs have liens on their settlements - ranging from child support to back taxes.

“I think that's been Exxon's strategy every step of the way - to wear everybody down,” says Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska. "They've succeeded in fatiguing those who were entitled to this compensation."

Osa Schultz and her husband got their checks last month of more than $50,000. They are still in debt.

"We always expected that the settlement would make a big difference and bring us back," she says. "It didn't even come close."

Shultz testified before Congress last year about the corrupting influences she says big business has on the political and legal system.

Shultz warned officials that, “Exxon's vast power and influence has tipped the scales of justice. For nearly a generation our community has been the David to their Goliath.”

For its part, Exxon Mobil declined a CBS News request for an interview, instead issuing this statement saying in part, "The Exxon Valdez oil spill was a tragic accident and one which the company deeply regrets."

Nearly 20 years later the legal battles are not over. Both sides are awaiting an appeals court decision to see if Exxon Mobil has to pay interest on the $507 million award. That decision could come as soon as this month.
 

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it was a HUGE windfall for virtually every fisherman, laborer, and boat owner in South Central AK.
I had buddies that literally made a million dollars in 6 months. No Guy


Orly??

(CBS) John Platt - a fisherman from Cordova, Alaska - made a pretty penny in the good old days. That was back in the 80's when an Alaskan fisherman could work hard and make a good living.

That was then. This is now. "My current financial situation is terrible," Platt says, "It's terrible."

He still earns his living fishing. But today Platt is deep in dept. He's waiting on a check he will never cash.

"My net worth is negative right now," he says. "Negative."

Platt is one of the 32,000 original plaintiffs in a lawsuit against corporate giant Exxon Mobil following the Exxon Valdez oil spill in 1989, reports CBS News chief national correspondent Byron Pitts.

Eleven million gallons of oil spilled along 1,300 miles of Alaskan coastline. The fishing industry was devastated. It was the worse disaster of its kind in U.S. history.

Back in 1989, Exxon executives, including Don Cornett, promised to take care of everyone affected by the spill.

“You have my word we will make you whole again," he said at the time.

In 1989, fishermen like Platt were hired to help clean up the spill. He made nearly $600,000 that year.

In total, Exxon spent more than $3.8 billion in clean up costs, fines and compensation. But in 1994, an Anchorage jury found Exxon acted recklessly and awarded victims of the spill $5 billion in punitive damages. An appeals court later cut that award in half.

But after nearly 15 years in appeals, the case finally reached the U.S. Supreme Court last year. The justices reduced that $2.5 billion in punitive damages to just more than $507 million.

Platt's share of the settlement is expected to be close to $400,000. But he still owes the state of Alaska $600,000 for his commercial fishing licenses. So his check will go straight to the state. But here's the kicker: he has to pay the taxes on it.

"A lot of people aren't going to make it," warns Platt.

At least 6,000 of the original plaintiffs have died, and 8,000 plaintiffs have liens on their settlements - ranging from child support to back taxes.

“I think that's been Exxon's strategy every step of the way - to wear everybody down,” says Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska. "They've succeeded in fatiguing those who were entitled to this compensation."

Osa Schultz and her husband got their checks last month of more than $50,000. They are still in debt.

"We always expected that the settlement would make a big difference and bring us back," she says. "It didn't even come close."

Shultz testified before Congress last year about the corrupting influences she says big business has on the political and legal system.

Shultz warned officials that, “Exxon's vast power and influence has tipped the scales of justice. For nearly a generation our community has been the David to their Goliath.”

For its part, Exxon Mobil declined a CBS News request for an interview, instead issuing this statement saying in part, "The Exxon Valdez oil spill was a tragic accident and one which the company deeply regrets."

Nearly 20 years later the legal battles are not over. Both sides are awaiting an appeals court decision to see if Exxon Mobil has to pay interest on the $507 million award. That decision could come as soon as this month.
CBS....Now there is a reliable news source. Who wrote that article, Dan Rather?
 

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CBS....Now there is a reliable news source. Who wrote that article, Dan Rather?
Believe it or not. Like it or lump it. I don't give a shit either way.
 
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