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F! ULYSSES GRANT !!!! WHAT WAS HE THINKING ....

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COMMON CARP (Cyprinus carpio)

Common in Grand Canyon and abundant in upper Lake Mead. A robust fish with large scales, dark golden body, more than 12 dorsal rays, toothless jaws, and a barbel at each corner of the upper jaw. The first ray of the dorsal and anal fins is spinous and strongly serrated. May attain a weight of 80 pounds. “Mirror carp” and “Jerusalem carp” have few very large scales. Spawning occurs in small aggregations with females releasing thousands of eggs, and young hatching in 4 to 6 days at 60oF. Carp feed on the bottom, vacuuming insects, algae, and organic matter. Carp are the most widespread and abundant non-native fish in North America, first introduced in 1872, from Germany. Carp were imported into the U.S. by the U.S. Fish Commission under President Ulysses S. Grant, as a valued food fish, and quickly raised and distributed to many states from 1879 to 1896. This wide distribution enabled the species to take hold in most drainages of North America, where it is commercially harvested in some regions, but considered a pest in most parts of the country. Carp are locally abundant in sheltered habitats of the Colorado River Basin, particularly in off-river impoundments, backwaters, and sand-silt tamarisk-lined banks that now dominate the Colorado and Green rivers. In Grand Canyon, carp probably constitute the greatest biomass of any species. Another large Asian cyprinid, the grass carp or white amur (Ctenopharyngodon idella) attains 100 pounds in weight, and is reported from the lower basin.

CHANNEL CATFISH (Ictalurus punctatus)

Locally common in Grand Canyon. Channel catfish were first introduced into the Colorado River near Moab, Utah in 1919 by active sportsman and public figure, Horace Stone Rutledge. The fingerlings were received from a hatchery in Kansas, with approval from the Bureau of Fisheries in Washington, D.C. They are common in some tributaries and tributary inflows of Grand Canyon, such as the Little Colorado River. Channel catfish are abundant in the middle reaches of the upper basin, particularly in canyons such as Desolation Canyon on the Green River and Ruby Canyon on the Colorado River. Their abundance declines progressively downstream to the confluence of these two rivers, but increases significantly in Cataract Canyon, indicating an association with rock substrate and swift canyon areas. The young are very numerous along shallow shorelines and backwaters, while juveniles and adults are abundant in eddies, often in sympatry with chubs. Their impact on the native fishes is unknown, but their abundance and omnivorous diet suggests competition and possibly predation. Although channel catfish are reported to reach nearly 50 pounds in weight, the largest specimens from the Colorado River are less than 10 pounds, although individuals of up to 20 pounds are reported from Lake Powell and Lake Mead. A close relative of the channel catfish-blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus)-are reported, but unconfirmed, from the Colorado River basin. Blue catfish lack the dark spots of the channel catfish, and have 30-35 anal fin rays, compared to 24 to 29 rays in (Pylodictus olivaris), and are common below Lake Mead.

RED SHINER (Cyprinella lutrensis)

Rare in upper Grand Canyon, common below Separation Canyon. Adult red shiners are usually deep bodied and laterally compressed, steel blue above and silvery below with orange fins. Breeding males are metallic blue with bright red fins and tubercles on the head and body. Spawning may occur twice in one year as water temperatures approach 65oF. Maximum size about 4 inches. Red shiners typically have eight or nine anal rays, whereas sand shiners typically have only seven. Red shiners were probably introduced into the Colorado River in the early 1900’s incidental with bass and sunfish from the Illinois River bottoms, or in bait buckets. Red shiners are the most common fish species in the upper basin, found primarily in backwaters and shallow sheltered habitats. They are tolerant of high turbidity and siltation, and avoid waters that are continuously clear or cool. The species is implicated in predation and competition with the native fishes because of its great abundance in the Colorado River Basin.

FATHEAD MINNOW (Pimephales promelas)

Locally common in Grand Canyon. A small robust minnow with a maximum size of about 4 inches, and characterized by brassy color. Males are robust with a black band around the body, and prominent pimple-like “tubercles” on a large head. Females are smaller and less robust. Fathead minnows are widely distributed in the warmer middle and lower regions of the Colorado River Basin. Their mode of access was probably via bait buckets, since the species is so popular as a bait fish for crappie and largemouth bass. The species may have gained access into the drainage as early as the late 1800’s incidental in seine hauls of bass and sunfish brought to the west from midwestern drainages. Fathead minnows can be very abundant locally in small pools and quiet areas. They thrive in warm, turbid waters, and can survive high temperatures and low oxygen levels better than any other species in the Colorado River, except perhaps black bullheads. The impact of the fathead minnow on native species is unknown, but like the other small cyprinids, it is implicated as a potential competitor and predator.

MOSQUITOFISH (Gambusia affinis)

Locally common in tributaries of the lower Colorado River in Grand Canyon. A small, delicate greenish fish with a robust belly, upward mouth, and square tail. Maximum size about 2 inches. Mosquitofish belong to the family of livebearers or viviparous fish. The males are distinguished by an elongated anal fin which is a highly-specialized rod-like organ, or gonopodium, used to internally fertilize the female. Up to 300 embryos develop internally within the female and the young are born live. All other species of fish in Grand Canyon are oviparous-producing eggs that are fertilized after leaving the body of the female. Mosquitofish were first introduced into the Colorado River in the 1930’s. It is native to the central United States from southern Illinois and Indiana to Alabama, and the lower Rio Grande in Texas. It has been distributed extensively since the 1950’s by mosquito abatement districts to control mosquitoes, and has received world-wide attention in helping to combat the malaria-carrying forms. It does not tolerate prolonged cold conditions (less than 40F) and does not occur extensively in northern regions, although it is tolerant to warm temperatures and low oxygen conditions. The low numbers and insectivorous diet of this species probably do not pose a major threat to native fishes.

STRIPED BASS (Morone saxatilis)

Occur in June, July, and August in small numbers in Grand Canyon, during spawning migrations from Lake Mead. Have been caught as far upstream as the Little Colorado River. A spiny-rayed fish with green back, white belly, silvery sides, and 6 to 8 black, lateral, horizontal stripes. Maximum size about 50 pounds in reservoirs, 100 pounds as sea-run form. Females generally ascend turbid rivers to spawn in spring, depositing thousands of tiny eggs that incubate and hatch as they drift back to the lake. Striped bass were first introduced into Lake Mead in the early 1970’s and into Lake Powell in 1974 to alleviate a decline in spawning and nursery habitat of largemouth bass and black crappie. Threadfin shad, a consistent and dependent forage for stripers, were also introduced. Striped bass have been a very successful sport fish, and are highly sought by trophy fishermen. A decline in threadfin shad sometimes sends striped bass populations into decline in numbers and condition of individuals, as seen in Lake Powell in 1982-83 and 1985-88. Rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) have been proposed as an alternate forage for stripers in Lake Powell. The impact of striped bass on the native fishes of the Colorado River has not been determined. Predation of native fish could be occurring during spawning ascents, or when native fishes enter the lake inflows inhabited by the species.

PLAINS KILLIFISH (Fundulus zebrinus)

Found primarily in tributaries of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon. A small cylindrical, minnow-like fish with black vertical bars. Maximum size about 5 inches. Killifish are known as “topminnows” because of their habit of skimming along just beneath the surface of the water feeding on insects and other small invertebrates. The top of the head and forward part of the back are broad and flat and the mouth is tilted upward so that it opens at the upper surface of the head to facilitate surface feeding. The species is easily distinguished by the presence of a seemingly massive protruding lower jaw with many teeth, thus the name “cyprinodont” which means “toothed carp”. Plains killifish, (Fundulus zebrinus) and plains topminnow (Fundulus sciadicus) are reported as incidental in the Colorado, Green, and White Rivers of the upper basin, and rare in the San Juan River. The plains killifish has a dorsal fin base situated above or forward of the anal fin base; usually 13 to 16 dorsal fin rays; 40 or more lateral line scales; and 12 to 13 dark vertical bars on the sides of the body. The plains topminnow has a dorsal fin base situated above the anal fin base; usually 6 to 11 dorsal fin rays; 38 or fewer lateral line scales; and without vertical bars or horizontal streaks. Plains killifish may compete with small native fishes for food.
 

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Don't Taze Me, Bro!
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The introduction of Striped and Largemouth bass, along with the damming of the River has all but decimated the "true" Colorado River Native Fish. Look up Bonytail Chub, Humpback Chub, Colorado Squawfish, Razorback Sucker, and others.

Bass are voracious eaters and the fry (baby fish) of the native chubs and suckers don't stand a chance.

For the past several years US Fish and Wildlife, Arizona Game and Fish and La Paz County have been in a joint venture where the endangered Native Fish Species are hatched in tanks, and then transplanted into our Golf Course Lakes. Once they get mature enough to fend off the bass and other predators, they are placed in the Lakes (Mohave, Mead, Powell, Havasu, and the River) to try and increase their numbers.

So far it's working pretty well and their number are up from where they were 10-15 years ago. But still not well enough to take them off of endangered status.

They actually found a few Northern Pike in one of the high country Arizona lakes, where some back east fisherman decided it would be cool to be able to fish for them out here.

If they were left to reproduce, it would be devastating for the fish population, both native and sport fish.
 

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Court Jester
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The introduction of Striped and Largemouth bass, along with the damming of the River has all but decimated the "true" Colorado River Native Fish. Look up Bonytail Chub, Humpback Chub, Colorado Squawfish, Razorback Sucker, and others.

Bass are voracious eaters and the fry (baby fish) of the native chubs and suckers don't stand a chance.

For the past several years US Fish and Wildlife, Arizona Game and Fish and La Paz County have been in a joint venture where the endangered Native Fish Species are hatched in tanks, and then transplanted into our Golf Course Lakes. Once they get mature enough to fend off the bass and other predators, they are placed in the Lakes (Mohave, Mead, Powell, Havasu, and the River) to try and increase their numbers.

So far it's working pretty well and their number are up from where they were 10-15 years ago. But still not well enough to take them off of endangered status.

They actually found a few Northern Pike in one of the high country Arizona lakes, where some back east fisherman decided it would be cool to be able to fish for them out here.

If they were left to reproduce, it would be devastating for the fish population, both native and sport fish.
So where did the Koi Herpes come from? Did fish and game release it to decrease the carp population? It's amazing to think that with as much water is in both mohave the river and havasu that the virus was not super diiluted yet so many fish have gotten sick and died from this virus.
 

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Don't Taze Me, Bro!
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1,812 Posts
So where did the Koi Herpes come from? Did fish and game release it to decrease the carp population? It's amazing to think that with as much water is in both mohave the river and havasu that the virus was not super diiluted yet so many fish have gotten sick and died from this virus.
Dump the conspiracy theories. Fish and Game isn't in the habit of releasing viruses into the environment just to target a specific species. Especially where it could affect such a large area.

I'm quite sure that they are trying to discover the source. It could have come from someone dumping their sick "pet" goldfish into the lake. It could have come from someone using infected bait goldfish. It could have come from someone freeing the fish from their Koi pond. It'll take time, but they are analyzing the fish and getting the DNA of the virus to try and trace it.

A virus doesn't really "dilute" in water, in a way that pouring a beer in the lake would disperse. A virus will actively seek a host, but only the host it's specifically looking for, and can last in ideal conditions for quite a long time.

Think about this swine flu thing. That's a virus that's gone global, in a relatively short time.
 

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Unhyphenated American
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Dump the conspiracy theories. Fish and Game isn't in the habit of releasing viruses into the environment just to target a specific species. Especially where it could affect such a large area.

I'm quite sure that they are trying to discover the source. It could have come from someone dumping their sick "pet" goldfish into the lake. It could have come from someone using infected bait goldfish. It could have come from someone freeing the fish from their Koi pond. It'll take time, but they are analyzing the fish and getting the DNA of the virus to try and trace it.

A virus doesn't really "dilute" in water, in a way that pouring a beer in the lake would disperse. A virus will actively seek a host, but only the host it's specifically looking for, and can last in ideal conditions for quite a long time.

Think about this swine flu thing. That's a virus that's gone global, in a relatively short time.

I have seen Koi in the marinas at mead. My guess is thats where it came from. Some yahoo let some koi go and the rest is history.
 

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We don't have any movie fish up here ....but we do have a nasty ass fish that will chew your arm off if you let it


They eat the damn trout so if ya catch em ..bonk on the noggin and over the bank for the coyotes to mow down on:|err
Pike or Musky?
 

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AZ law now includes taking Carp and Strippers by spear gun. I can tell you it's good cheap fun if you get bored just hanging in a cove.
Yes they are fun, but I'm not sure about cheap... :D :D :D

 
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