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Boat Nut
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5,131 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Having problems maintaining fuel pressure, pressure dropped from intial setting of 5psi to 3psi. Reset regulator to 7psi, seems better, but runnin home yesterday, lost all fuel pressure, with just enought to keep it runnig. I have a safety switch, on the motor for the electric pump, jumped the switch let it run for an hour with no issues with 7 psi. Im thinking the oil pressure switch is flaking out, the staked terminals are loose. Any suggestions for a quality switch? I'm running a Bosch relay for the pump power, so I should be good there.
 

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Premium Member
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That is probably your trouble. But let me ask. Why do you run it thru a oil pressure switch? So you don't have to remember to turn it on and off. Because if your doing it because you think or hope it will save you motor in the event you lose oil pressure, forget it. If the oil pressure fails, the motor will be toast before the float bowls empty. If you doing to stop the pump in event an accident, well, thats fine, but it is one more thing to go wrong, and its not exactly like a car where an accident could potentionally pump fuel on to the ground from a broken line.



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Boat Nut
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Discussion Starter #3
It is for safety, and to meet the racing regs for electric fuel pumps, engine off/fuel off.
I can kill the power from the dash switch, and by pulling the lanyard. Am I getting too involved here?
 

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No, I understand now. I can see where the racing org requires it. But having the power for the relay go thru that many different things will require that you stay on top of them or they could give you fits. We have had a coupe of oil pressure warning lights fail. They aren't real vibration proof. Now we replace it every couple years and save them as spares.

Ever consider a mechanical pump. The engine dies, the pump stops pumping. Its a pretty cool arrangment.:D



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Boat Nut
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Discussion Starter #5
Yea, I would have a mechanical pump in a heart beat, but my Gen V block has no boss. I noticed I was low on fuel, as well, maybe two gallons in the stacker tank, is aeration a possiblity. Seems fine tonight, ran it for a couple hours. Still looking to get a better switch, than the Summit/Holley deal.
 

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steelcomp was here
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My ignition and fuel pump were on separate switches on the dash. They both had separate relays. The ignition sw. also controlled the gauges, gauge lights and the launch control. The dead man would kill the ignition and fuel pump, but the dash and gauges would stay live as long as the ignition sw. was still on. There was only one wire through the dead man. :D
 

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steelcomp was here
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It is for safety, and to meet the racing regs for electric fuel pumps, engine off/fuel off.
I can kill the power from the dash switch, and by pulling the lanyard. Am I getting too involved here?
If you're not required to have the pressure kill sw. then I'd eliminate it. If your lanyard kills the fuel, shouldn't that be enough?
Low fuel level can definitely cause pressure fluctuations. I remember my dad didn't have a fuel level gauge in our boat when I was a kid...he always new it was getting low on gas by the fuel pressure gauge. Never ran out that I can remember, but I do remember making some mad dashes to the gas dock! :|err
 

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LAID IN MEXICO
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My ignition and fuel pump were on separate switches on the dash. They both had separate relays. The ignition sw. also controlled the gauges, gauge lights and the launch control. The dead man would kill the ignition and fuel pump, but the dash and gauges would stay live as long as the ignition sw. was still on. There was only one wire through the dead man. :D
so you either ran switched power through the dead man, after the ign switch, and before the two switches; or you ran the dead man on the ground for the switched (trigger) power, before the two relays!!
 

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Boat Nut
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Discussion Starter #14
So can I simplfy it a little..... Key off = fuel off, Lanyard pulled = fuel off, fuel pump switch off = fuel off.

All three would cover any situation, I can think of. What say you?
 

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Yep. I would dump the pressure on the engine. The less things the power has to pass through the better. We failed a toggle run/stop switch in a race while leading. It wasn't in the boat at the next race. Now, its the lanyard switch, and that is. But we don't have a fuel pump to turn off and on.
I have a question?, probably should know, What mechanical fuel pump runs a big power BBC in a GN boat?
 

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Any of the 6 valve pumps will fuel just about any gas, and many alky blower motors. Problem is, out of all the manufatures, Edelbrock, Holley, BG, and Clay Smith, only Clay Smith still makes the pump.
The Holley Billet 12-454-25 170 GPH and the 12-454-30 200GPH pumps should be more than cabable as well. But at roughly 275.00 and 425.00 the Clay Smith at roughly 100.00 is a bargin. Superdave 013 on the boards handles Clay Smith pumps.




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