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just pick up an old southwind 1978 with 460 ford. how can i tell if it is hp or just stock ser numbers port size ? thanks
 

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just pick up an old southwind 1978 with 460 ford. how can i tell if it is hp or just stock ser numbers port size ? thanks
Hi, I am a newby with the ford. I think you can look up the casting numbers. oposite side of oil filter, and on the heads, port side between the last twoexhaust flanges, just outboard of the valve cover. Look up the numbers at;
http://reincarnation-automotive.com/casting-numbers-descriptions-1-index.html.

that should tell you what castings you have.
Any help? Good luck.:)hand
 

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just pick up an old southwind 1978 with 460 ford. how can i tell if it is hp or just stock ser numbers port size ? thanks
Gimme the head casting # on the exhaust flange of the heads... as for port size they go from BIG to BIGGER to HUGE (huge hasnt been around since 1973)... Prolly a standard duty truck engine, check the balancer spacer for a hatchet shaped counter weight which is standard for all later model 460s...

About the ONLY HD 460s I know of would be in a dump truck or sumpin like that...
 

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Lakes Only will be along shortly. Prepare to be lectured.;)
 

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I love the lectures. I learn something every time Lakesonly and 058 share their vast knowledge.
Hi Bob......Lakes is better versed that me when it comes to jetboats and what they came from the factory with. In general: all pass. car blocks from 1968 to 78 [C8-C9-D0-D1] are basically the same. There are some minor casting differences like pan rail width and main webbing [cast web vs machined web] but as the base block goes they are all pretty much the same and do not vary much in cylinder and deck thickness aside from core shift and production tolerances. Block deck heights vary, 68 to 70 should be 10.300", late 70 and thru 71 should be 10.310" and 72 to 78 [and all D9 blocks] should be 10.320" That covers the early blocks. The later blocks, D9s made from 1979 to end of production have longer cylinders and extend further into the crankcase about a 1/4" so the late cranks [3Y] that are slightly smaller diameter need to be used in the later blocks. Aside from core shift all blocks should be able to take a .080" overbore [4.44"] and a few can go as much as 4.52" bore but sonic testing is an absolute must. All blocks with the exception of the SCJ, very few CJs, a few rare hd truck 429s and Boss 429/A-460 blocks are 2 bolt mains but are usually good to the 750 hp level, more if your tuneup is spot on. Heads are most likely D3VE-A2As [app 95 cc chambers] and unless they have been worked on or changed they should have the 2.09" intake and the 1.66" exhaust. Stock heads are nothing special but respond well to the usual 3 angle v/j, port and bowl mods and bigger valves. Doing the exhaust port is almost an absolute must as it is very congested for emission purposes. The origional marine engines usually have forged pistons, CJ/truck rods, SCJ iron intake manifolds [CJ intakes are spreadbore carb flange and used a Rochester Quadrajet] All 460s have cast cranks and are generally good to the 800hp level with good tuneup. Early [68-78][2Y series] cranks are internally balanced and the later [79-up] 3Y cranks are externally balance and have the "cookiecutter" weighted sleeve behind the vibration dampener....How's that for a lecture?:D
 

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Class Lecture: Ford 385 Series 101

just pick up an old southwind 1978 with 460 ford. how can i tell if it is hp or just stock ser numbers port size ? thanks
The cylinder head casting numbers are located on the outside of the head, along the valve cover mounting rail and between the 3rd and 4th exhaust ports. The are visible simply by looking at the engine. You should be able to find a cast-in alphanumeric number, possibly one of the following:
  • C8VE-E
  • C9VE-A
  • D0VE-C
  • D2VE-AA
  • D3VE-A2A
Or, it may appear similar to one of the above numbers but a little different.

The block casting number is located on the outside of the engine, at the rear of the cylinder bank, behind the starter motor and reads vertically. There, you should be able to find a cast-in alphanumeric number, possibly one of the following:
  • C8VE-B
  • C9VE-B
  • D0VE-A
  • D1VE-A2B
  • D9TE-AB
Or, it may appear similar to one of the above numbers but a little different.

The 429 and the 460, on any given year of production, use all identical parts except for the crankshaft (stroke) and pistons (pin location). So other than the crank and pistons, all the parts are the same for any given year. Therefore, the external appearance leaves almost no clue for verifying engine displacement if the engine tag is gone. If your engine is installed, it's pretty hard to identify displacement except for maybe measure the stroke though a spark plug hole with a piece of straight wire.

Other ways to evaluate whether you have a 429 or 460:

One way is to flip the motor over and unbutton the pan. One of the crankshaft counterweights has alphanumeric markings stamped on it's edge, and these markings identify whether it's a 429 or 460 crankshaft.

429 = 4U, 4UA or 4UAB

460 = 2Y, 2YA, 2YAB or 2YABC....or 3Y or 3YA.

Example:



Also, for quick identification of the crankshaft, you may look for the nodule or embossment between the first main journal and counterweight. The 460 is embossed there, while the 429 is not:

429


460


At this point in your boat's history, it could simply have a passenger car engine in it, and that's fine especially it was built for the jet boat application. If it is original to your jet boat then it might be a 460 Marine engine

460 Marine: The typical Harman Marine 460 (etc) that came in the thousands of jet boats manufactured in California (and elsewhere) during the jet boat craze in the 1970's came with front sump CJ pans (with integral windage tray) , passenger car dished cast pistons, D3VE heads (usually non-thermactor D3's) that had spring cups and slightly different valve springs, usually CJ/truck rods, the SCJ intake with a post-70 date code, SCJ camshaft, etc. Usually we have found fully-grooved main bearings in the factory Marine 460's.

(The 460 King Cobra was offered starting in the 1980's and into the 1990's and is a D9TE blocked external balance engine. Also, whereas most Marine-issue 460's (Harman Marine, etc) had cast dish top pistons, the King Cobra came with forged flat top pistons made by TRW. I believe the King Cobra 460 was "rated" at 340 hp.)

LO
 

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www.highflowdynamics.com
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About the ONLY HD 460s I know of would be in a dump truck or sumpin like that...
The Ford 460 was never installed into commercial dump trucks. There was, however, a commercial 429 engine.

LO
 

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Anybody else have a flashback to "My Cousin Vinny" during that??



"100% balls accurate"
 

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steelcomp was here
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The cylinder head casting numbers are located on the outside of the head, along the valve cover mounting rail and between the 3rd and 4th exhaust ports. The are visible simply by looking at the engine. You should be able to find a cast-in alphanumeric number, possibly one of the following:
  • C8VE-E
  • C9VE-A
  • D0VE-C
  • D2VE-AA
  • D3VE-A2A
Or, it may appear similar to one of the above numbers but a little different.

The block casting number is located on the outside of the engine, at the rear of the cylinder bank, behind the starter motor and reads vertically. There, you should be able to find a cast-in alphanumeric number, possibly one of the following:
  • C8VE-B
  • C9VE-B
  • D0VE-A
  • D1VE-A2B
  • D9TE-AB
Or, it may appear similar to one of the above numbers but a little different.

The 429 and the 460, on any given year of production, use all identical parts except for the crankshaft (stroke) and pistons (pin location). So other than the crank and pistons, all the parts are the same for any given year. Therefore, the external appearance leaves almost no clue for verifying engine displacement if the engine tag is gone. If your engine is installed, it's pretty hard to identify displacement except for maybe measure the stroke though a spark plug hole with a piece of straight wire.

Other ways to evaluate whether you have a 429 or 460:

One way is to flip the motor over and unbutton the pan. One of the crankshaft counterweights has alphanumeric markings stamped on it's edge, and these markings identify whether it's a 429 or 460 crankshaft.

429 = 4U, 4UA or 4UAB

460 = 2Y, 2YA, 2YAB or 2YABC....or 3Y or 3YA.

Example:



Also, for quick identification of the crankshaft, you may look for the nodule or embossment between the first main journal and counterweight. The 460 is embossed there, while the 429 is not:

429


460


At this point in your boat's history, it could simply have a passenger car engine in it, and that's fine especially it was built for the jet boat application. If it is original to your jet boat then it might be a 460 Marine engine

460 Marine: The typical Harman Marine 460 (etc) that came in the thousands of jet boats manufactured in California (and elsewhere) during the jet boat craze in the 1970's came with front sump CJ pans (with integral windage tray) , passenger car dished cast pistons, D3VE heads (usually non-thermactor D3's) that had spring cups and slightly different valve springs, usually CJ/truck rods, the SCJ intake with a post-70 date code, SCJ camshaft, etc. Usually we have found fully-grooved main bearings in the factory Marine 460's.

(The 460 King Cobra was offered starting in the 1980's and into the 1990's and is a D9TE blocked external balance engine. Also, whereas most Marine-issue 460's (Harman Marine, etc) had cast dish top pistons, the King Cobra came with forged flat top pistons made by TRW. I believe the King Cobra 460 was "rated" at 340 hp.)

LO
It's not really an integral windage tray, it's more a slosh baffle.
 

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058 and Lakes Only...........

You both passed the course. And to think I thought you were both asleep during the lectures.

Good job.

RR
 

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The cylinder head casting numbers are located on the outside of the head, along the valve cover mounting rail and between the 3rd and 4th exhaust ports. The are visible simply by looking at the engine. You should be able to find a cast-in alphanumeric number, possibly one of the following:
  • C8VE-E
  • C9VE-A
  • D0VE-C
  • D2VE-AA
  • D3VE-A2A
Or, it may appear similar to one of the above numbers but a little different.

The block casting number is located on the outside of the engine, at the rear of the cylinder bank, behind the starter motor and reads vertically. There, you should be able to find a cast-in alphanumeric number, possibly one of the following:
  • C8VE-B
  • C9VE-B
  • D0VE-A
  • D1VE-A2B
  • D9TE-AB
Or, it may appear similar to one of the above numbers but a little different.

The 429 and the 460, on any given year of production, use all identical parts except for the crankshaft (stroke) and pistons (pin location). So other than the crank and pistons, all the parts are the same for any given year. Therefore, the external appearance leaves almost no clue for verifying engine displacement if the engine tag is gone. If your engine is installed, it's pretty hard to identify displacement except for maybe measure the stroke though a spark plug hole with a piece of straight wire.

Other ways to evaluate whether you have a 429 or 460:

One way is to flip the motor over and unbutton the pan. One of the crankshaft counterweights has alphanumeric markings stamped on it's edge, and these markings identify whether it's a 429 or 460 crankshaft.

429 = 4U, 4UA or 4UAB

460 = 2Y, 2YA, 2YAB or 2YABC....or 3Y or 3YA.

Example:



Also, for quick identification of the crankshaft, you may look for the nodule or embossment between the first main journal and counterweight. The 460 is embossed there, while the 429 is not:

429


460


At this point in your boat's history, it could simply have a passenger car engine in it, and that's fine especially it was built for the jet boat application. If it is original to your jet boat then it might be a 460 Marine engine

460 Marine: The typical Harman Marine 460 (etc) that came in the thousands of jet boats manufactured in California (and elsewhere) during the jet boat craze in the 1970's came with front sump CJ pans (with integral windage tray) , passenger car dished cast pistons, D3VE heads (usually non-thermactor D3's) that had spring cups and slightly different valve springs, usually CJ/truck rods, the SCJ intake with a post-70 date code, SCJ camshaft, etc. Usually we have found fully-grooved main bearings in the factory Marine 460's.

(The 460 King Cobra was offered starting in the 1980's and into the 1990's and is a D9TE blocked external balance engine. Also, whereas most Marine-issue 460's (Harman Marine, etc) had cast dish top pistons, the King Cobra came with forged flat top pistons made by TRW. I believe the King Cobra 460 was "rated" at 340 hp.)

LO
Paul, You Sir, Are a huge asset to this site. For what it is worth, I really enjoy reading your threads. Joe
 

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Fat snout, forged steel crank true? Something on the order of a 391 industrial?
The 391 was a variation of the FE engine family, it was called the FT series [Ford truck] that consisted of 330" 359" and 391" engines based on the FE design. Most had steel cranks with the larger snout, the blocks were cast in a slightly different iron alloy and had the extra crank webbing similar to the Hi perf. FE blocks. These engines were true truck engines with positive valve rotators, hi volume oil pump and 5/16" pump drive [extra oil for the air compressor] cylinder heads were designed for heavy duty-long life use. Most, if not all, had mechanical governers using Holley truck carbs that had the throttle over-ride controlled by the dist. Theres more but why?:rolleyes:....More useless shit to file away into the archives of your brain.:D
 

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Already miss the 310/562
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I couldn't agree more. It is nice to know that when, yes when, I build a 385 AND WIN, there people like LO and 058 that I can depend on for good solid info on a motor that is under rated and misunderstood
;) fixed it for ya ;)
 

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I couldn't agree more. It is nice to know that when, yes when, I ever get around to buildng a 385, there people like LO and 058 that I can depend on for good solid info on a motor that is under rated and misunderstood
Wow, I'm surprised. I didn't know you were considering building a 385 series engine. It would be an honor and a pleasure to assist you in any way I can. Best regards, Bob
 
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