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Reaching out to the experts for your thoughts and comments. I’m going to look at a Hondo RB with a naturally aspirated 427. I don’t see many 427’s used in v-drives thus I’m curious about the set up. Good/bad? Hard to locate parts? Not enough low end power? Could this engine accept a blower? Worth it? Looking forward to all comments and suggestions. TIA
 

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Nothing wrong with a 427. I ran one in my Cole years ago. I've still got it, and I plan on putting it in my Hondo one day.
A real one, the reason you don't see them very often, is they quit putting them in cars in 1969.
They are hard to find !
 

· Village Idiot
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I love 427’s. They are great engine. You don’t see many as more cubic inches cost the same to build. Also, with the better parts we have available today we can spin the bigger engines safely to the same rpm level of the old 427s. But if you got it, run it!
Paul
 

· Just another Wannabe
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Just a little history lesson;
SuperStock is the most successful and the most competed class of circle flatbottom boats over the last 35 years. Every single SuperStock boat is a 427 chevy. In fact, that is the most common engine combination for a flattie. Oft times, flats don't like to take a set real quick if they have too much torque. But they love horsepower. That 427 is perfect for that. People that build a 540 and put it in a Biesemeyer that worked great with a 427 find really quick that it doesn't set as quick and as nice as it did with a short stroke engine.
When Scotty Steele was developing his white K boats for the river, he was using 360 cubic inch big block chevys on blown alcohol to achieve this high horsepower and low torque option. Those boats set like no K I have ever seen.
There are quite a few single carb 427s with spec heads that will run 120 on the lakes and rivers. And that is real speed. Not some inbred Jed with a 460 ford in his v-bottom jet that "does 100mph." A legit 120 ain't no joke.
Now, as to the engine you have and will it take a blower, that is all up to the internals in the engine. But a blown 427 with moderate heads can be set up to work great. It won't set as easy and as pretty as a N/A engine, but if a blower is what you want . . .
 

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Just a little history lesson;
SuperStock is the most successful and the most competed class of circle flatbottom boats over the last 35 years. Every single SuperStock boat is a 427 chevy. In fact, that is the most common engine combination for a flattie. Oft times, flats don't like to take a set real quick if they have too much torque. But they love horsepower. That 427 is perfect for that. People that build a 540 and put it in a Biesemeyer that worked great with a 427 find really quick that it doesn't set as quick and as nice as it did with a short stroke engine.
When Scotty Steele was developing his white K boats for the river, he was using 360 cubic inch big block chevys on blown alcohol to achieve this high horsepower and low torque option. Those boats set like no K I have ever seen.
There are quite a few single carb 427s with spec heads that will run 120 on the lakes and rivers. And that is real speed. Not some inbred Jed with a 460 ford in his v-bottom jet that "does 100mph." A legit 120 ain't no joke.
Now, as to the engine you have and will it take a blower, that is all up to the internals in the engine. But a blown 427 with moderate heads can be set up to work great. It won't set as easy and as pretty as a N/A engine, but if a blower is what you want . . .
Wannabe, I appreciate the response and info! I’ve always wanted a flat with a blown engine…..however, I’m not a racer and in the end it’d probably be a lot easier to maintain a NA set up and then there’s the octane fuel availability issue. Plus, I don’t need to go faster than 120, or even 100 really. It would be fun to build up a good NA 427 and since it’s been done many times before I’ll bet there’s plenty of good recipes out there that will assure high HP coupled with good reliability.
 

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So, I looked at a 1972 Hondo runner bottom with a 427. This poor boat was rode hard and put away wet, very wet! The seller stated it had a 454 block with a 427 crank. A “solid” 580 cam with roller lifters. The block began life as a two bolt main that was supposedly converted to a four bolt main. A single Deamon carb, didnt know the size. No receipts for anything. 10* Casale V-Drive, no whirl away. Wires running everywhere. Up/down pedal, no ratchet. Bare hole where the dash tach was, no other gauges. There were stress cracks everywhere and various blisters and bubbles in the glass. It needed paint badly. The upholstery was shot and the trailer needed work. A project boat for sure!
To much work for me, I’d rather spend the time driving!
Back to looking. Perfect boat would be a Hondo or Cole T-Deck runner bottom with a strong engine, casale v-drive with whirlaway and something that’s been taken care of! I’m open to all suggestions!
 

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one of the cars I'd most love to try right now is the Honda e. It looks like an 80s hatchback but unfortunately it's priced like a tesla. If they want to become the king of cool electric hatches I'm all for it.
Thank you for your reply, which has nothing at all to do with this topic.
Welcome to the Ignore list !

Edit: Troll B Gone works fast !
 

· Just another Wannabe
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Not that we need it, but let's look at a couple of things.
A 454 block and a 427 block are the same thing. They are the same bore. The variable that makes the cubic inch is the stroke difference. 3.76" is a 427, 4.0 stroke is a 454 and a 4.25 stroke is a 496. All the same block and heads.
A 2 bolt block is a fine thing. There are lots of hard running 2 bolt blocks out there. If they have a good align hone on it, they will run fine. Also, a fresh block will always be better than a used up block. When you can't use a 2 bolt block is when you really increase cylinder pressure. (Think blowers, nitrous, turbo or a combination that really lets the air in.) The convert to 4 bolt is a good thing if the machinist did a good job. If they didn't, then it will not help. So hard to tell until you run it and the caps move around.
No matter if it is a flat tappet lifter or a roller lifter nose, there are two kinds of lifters. Hydraulic and solid. Hydraulic sets the lash off of oil pressure. Solids are just that and you set the valve lash with a feeler gauge when the valve is closed. Both are great. If you are running a hydraulic lifter, you usually can't run high rpms unless you use a super high dollar lifter. Hydraulic lifters usually require less maintenance, and last a little longer. But so much depends on the parts you buy and how you treat the engine.
Ain't nothing wrong with a Demon carburetor. In fact, I much prefer them out of the box than a Holley. I just built a high torque SBC for my 75 blazer and the dyno told me that Demon was the best choice. And, at 486.4 foot pounds of torque, that is really hard to argue. Any brand of carb can be set up right. Also, don't get into that concept that a larger carburetor is better. It is usually worse. Us guys get that "bigger is better" mentality. And we do that in cams, heads and carbs. But almost every time, the engine will run better and make us happier if we choose the smaller cam than we really want, the smaller heads that we really want and the smaller carb. Carbs are all about signal and flow. Too much size will kill both of these things. Anyone happy with their boat knows that it starts easy, idles nice, runs well at any rpm and puts a smile on your face at wide open throttle. We don't need to go crazy to do that. We need to find balance. Once we find balance, we need to leave it alone.
Trust me when I say that many times at the lakes and rivers with a ton of blown big blocks and dual quad tunnel rams, there were lots of boat owners super jealous of a 327 small block boat with a 650 demon carb that only ran 88.6 mph. Because it did that, pulled people on tubes, skiers, won races and drove dam to dam with four different drivers. THAT is what you want from a v-drive boat. Balance
Water Vehicle Boat Watercraft Boats and boating--Equipment and supplies
 

· Village Idiot
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Not that we need it, but let's look at a couple of things.
A 454 block and a 427 block are the same thing. They are the same bore. The variable that makes the cubic inch is the stroke difference. 3.76" is a 427, 4.0 stroke is a 454 and a 4.25 stroke is a 496. All the same block and heads.
A 2 bolt block is a fine thing. There are lots of hard running 2 bolt blocks out there. If they have a good align hone on it, they will run fine. Also, a fresh block will always be better than a used up block. When you can't use a 2 bolt block is when you really increase cylinder pressure. (Think blowers, nitrous, turbo or a combination that really lets the air in.) The convert to 4 bolt is a good thing if the machinist did a good job. If they didn't, then it will not help. So hard to tell until you run it and the caps move around.
No matter if it is a flat tappet lifter or a roller lifter nose, there are two kinds of lifters. Hydraulic and solid. Hydraulic sets the lash off of oil pressure. Solids are just that and you set the valve lash with a feeler gauge when the valve is closed. Both are great. If you are running a hydraulic lifter, you usually can't run high rpms unless you use a super high dollar lifter. Hydraulic lifters usually require less maintenance, and last a little longer. But so much depends on the parts you buy and how you treat the engine.
Ain't nothing wrong with a Demon carburetor. In fact, I much prefer them out of the box than a Holley. I just built a high torque SBC for my 75 blazer and the dyno told me that Demon was the best choice. And, at 486.4 foot pounds of torque, that is really hard to argue. Any brand of carb can be set up right. Also, don't get into that concept that a larger carburetor is better. It is usually worse. Us guys get that "bigger is better" mentality. And we do that in cams, heads and carbs. But almost every time, the engine will run better and make us happier if we choose the smaller cam than we really want, the smaller heads that we really want and the smaller carb. Carbs are all about signal and flow. Too much size will kill both of these things. Anyone happy with their boat knows that it starts easy, idles nice, runs well at any rpm and puts a smile on your face at wide open throttle. We don't need to go crazy to do that. We need to find balance. Once we find balance, we need to leave it alone.
Trust me when I say that many times at the lakes and rivers with a ton of blown big blocks and dual quad tunnel rams, there were lots of boat owners super jealous of a 327 small block boat with a 650 demon carb that only ran 88.6 mph. Because it did that, pulled people on tubes, skiers, won races and drove dam to dam with four different drivers. THAT is what you want from a v-drive boat. Balance
View attachment 1046150
That looks like an annular 750 to me. But what would I know.

Paul
 

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Wannabe, thank you for the valuable info! I maybe sent the wrong message when I described the boat and engine I looked at. The turn off for me wasn’t the 454 block with a 427 crank, the carb or other parts, but the fact the boat was trashed. It clearly had not been taken care of. All wiring was just a spider web, laying across manifolds etc. Headers were rusted. Fuel line had an inline filter that just dangled and flopped around, there was three inches of standing water in the bilges, the upholstery was mildewed and waterlogged. I’m looking for a boat that someone has taken care of and shows prideful ownership. At 66 I’ve learned I’d rather pay more for a well taken care of boat knowing that in the long run it’ll cost me less and require far less work.
All that said I’m a relative newcomer and open to all ideas and suggestions this experienced group may have to offer! Thank you all in advance.
 

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Wannabe, thank you for the valuable info! I maybe sent the wrong message when I described the boat and engine I looked at. The turn off for me wasn’t the 454 block with a 427 crank, the carb or other parts, but the fact the boat was trashed. It clearly had not been taken care of. All wiring was just a spider web, laying across manifolds etc. Headers were rusted. Fuel line had an inline filter that just dangled and flopped around, there was three inches of standing water in the bilges, the upholstery was mildewed and waterlogged. I’m looking for a boat that someone has taken care of and shows prideful ownership. At 66 I’ve learned I’d rather pay more for a well taken care of boat knowing that in the long run it’ll cost me less and require far less work.
All that said I’m a relative newcomer and open to all ideas and suggestions this experienced group may have to offer! Thank you all in advance.
It sounds like the boat would be easily brought to life by someone willing to invest some time and effort. Those arent for everybody. They come with expensive surprises sometimes.
 

· Just another Wannabe
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Oh no.
I didn't think you were saying anything about the boat or how the engine wasn't this or that. Not at all.
When you start to talk about cracks all over the hull, you are talking about a pretty decent project. And a project that often times finds things much worse than originally thought. Those can drain you of time and money. I think you did the right thing passing that boat up. It will be great for someone that wants a project. My guess is that inside the engine there were signs of age and neglect as well.
And, as we get older, we have less time and energy for a project this large. Trust me - I won't do a project as extensive as my last one.
My post was in no way a response to your post, but I figured it was a good place to bring up a couple of points, as most of us are in the boating offseason and need a little something to talk about..
 

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Oh no.
I didn't think you were saying anything about the boat or how the engine wasn't this or that. Not at all.
When you start to talk about cracks all over the hull, you are talking about a pretty decent project. And a project that often times finds things much worse than originally thought. Those can drain you of time and money. I think you did the right thing passing that boat up. It will be great for someone that wants a project. My guess is that inside the engine there were signs of age and neglect as well.
And, as we get older, we have less time and energy for a project this large. Trust me - I won't do a project as extensive as my last one.
My post was in no way a response to your post, but I figured it was a good place to bring up a couple of points, as most of us are in the boating offseason and need a little something to talk about..
I certainly agree about having less time and energy for big projects! However, if you’ve been down the boat project pathway before did you photo document it? Was the project captured somewhere on these forums? I’d enjoy seeing what you did and learning from your experience!
 

· Village Idiot
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This does not go into great detail, but hits the main points.

Paul
 
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