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Discussion Starter #1
i have used the old type & bought the new mack one & i am not having any luck.here are some pics. the old one is striped out & the new one doesn't compress the rings enough to get in the cyl. i had to use a rubber mallet & tap around the mack one to get it to settle in enough to maybey go in . major fight & i lost 2 second rings & 2 oil rings. 3 different pistons . i swear i'm not a tard. any tips or better tool info apriciated.
 

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I had same problem...especially oil ring rails....i ended up using a large hose clamp....over the ring compressor and ground the clamp mechanism flat on one side so it would flush against the block...a couple of the compression rings gave me guff...i have a piece of hardwood i used to use on motorcycle pistons to work the rings in...
And the wood handle on a plenty light body hammer to 'lightly tap' the piston down


If you are breaking parts you are using about twice as much force as necessary......if it won't load in reasonable easy might be a good time to put your glasses on and find out why:)bulb
You did check end gap, correct? I think mine were @ .024-.026...on a 4.250
 

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Living in a cage of fear
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Is there any chamfer on the top of the cylinders?
I've used both of those compressors with no problems.
The less chamfer, the more critical it is to be squared up before the final "smack".

Load the piston in the cylinder, position ring gaps as needed, put the tool over it and FLAT on the deck, , raise piston up by the rod end underneath, squeeze until partially tight, tap lightly to square it up, squeeze again to compress fully, repeat, then whack it in. If everything is right it should go.

Sounds like you have a sharp edge on the deck to Me.:)bulb

I've had some oil rings that required care to compress fully. Had to squeeze the tool a little bit to get the ends in, then made sure I could move the ring and tool freely in the groove before squeezing it all the way tight.
 

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I'm sure you are aware, but worth mentioning just in case. There is a taper to the MAC compressor. One side is smaller (taper) and has a direction arrow to push the piston in.
Just a thought.
Good luck, be safe. schick
 

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Buy a one piece ring compresser for your bore size.Once you do your done damaging rings and you will never go back to an adjustable ring compresser.
 

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Buy a one piece ring compresser for your bore size.Once you do your done damaging rings and you will never go back to an adjustable ring compresser.
X2...anything else is "OLD" school...i have been useing them for 30+ years & have never broken any rings...so simple to use :)...you can find them on EBay in .030 & .060 sizes for BBC...just sayin' my .02 cents :)

FastRat
 

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steelcomp was here
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i have used the old type & bought the new mack one & i am not having any luck.here are some pics. the old one is striped out & the new one doesn't compress the rings enough to get in the cyl. i had to use a rubber mallet & tap around the mack one to get it to settle in enough to maybey go in . major fight & i lost 2 second rings & 2 oil rings. 3 different pistons . i swear i'm not a tard. any tips or better tool info apriciated.
The minute you have to hit anything on en engine hard enough to do that kind of damage, STOP! Don't just keep beating on it! Nothing about an engine's assembly should ever take that kind of force. If it does, there's something very wrong, as you found out.
Tapered ring compressors are the only way to go. I use the same adjustable compressor you have when I don't have the right tapered compressor, and never, ever had a problem. I do the sale thing as Tommy (thatguy)...set the piston in the bore, open the compressor up so it slides easily over the rings, then set it flat on the deck of the block, then gently tighten it up over the rings. I don;'t even lift the piston. As I tighten the compressor, I gently tap on the top of it with a plastic mallet to keep it over the oil rings and square with the deck. Once it's tight and the rings are fully compressed, with the butt end of the handle of the plastic mallet just gently tap the piston into the cylinder. If it takes more than that, again, STOP! Something's not right and you need to start over. The cylinders should only need a small chamfer if everything is right.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
well my block is .100 over so the chamfer is probable not as good as it used to be. i am using atf instead of oil this time. i squeezed the rings so tight i had to bop the piston harder than usual using a rubber mallet . i did have the mack tool the correct direction.i wound up aligning the opening on the mack tool with the notch in the block to help guide the little bit of ring still hanging out into the cyl. gapped the top ring at .035 & the 2nd at .026 ( going to try to get some nitrous & higher boost going) . i did just order a one piece billet aluminum compressor for my bore size today from summit. thanks guys!
 

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And if you oil rings are not assembled and set right in the groove, none of the above is going to help.

If you can go for the size specific tapered deals, than like Steel said, this is the next best thing, and great for when your working with some off size.
At less than 30.00, its probably the best all around setup.
I use this one and can bump the piston in there with my hand. Dont tighten the piss out of one of these, its not necessary.
 

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I am with the one size deal. Tapered for specific bore. Well, those are expensive you say 30 bucks or so. Hell you just cost yourself more than that in ****ed up rings.
Wags
Oh, BTW, if you aren't an engine builder, you will buy 2 or 3 in a lifetime. If you are, the time and aggervation they save is priceless.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Is there any chamfer on the top of the cylinders?
I've used both of those compressors with no problems.
The less chamfer, the more critical it is to be squared up before the final "smack".

Load the piston in the cylinder, position ring gaps as needed, put the tool over it and FLAT on the deck, , raise piston up by the rod end underneath, squeeze until partially tight, tap lightly to square it up, squeeze again to compress fully, repeat, then whack it in. If everything is right it should go.

Sounds like you have a sharp edge on the deck to Me.:)bulb

I've had some oil rings that required care to compress fully. Had to squeeze the tool a little bit to get the ends in, then made sure I could move the ring and tool freely in the groove before squeezing it all the way tight.
no , no they are not ! i just checked & there is no chamfer left!
 

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compressor

And if you oil rings are not assembled and set right in the groove, none of the above is going to help.

If you can go for the size specific tapered deals, than like Steel said, this is the next best thing, and great for when your working with some off size.
At less than 30.00, its probably the best all around setup.
After beating on pistons, I can now push then in my hand. Nice and gentle. I actually have 6 different sizes of these, for each motor I've done. Summet, nex day delivery. They have more in stock then their catalog shows. A simple call will suprise you.

Jerry
 

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Living in a cage of fear
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no , no they are not ! i just checked & there is no chamfer left!
There you go. It would be a good start.

Don't want it too big, but you gotta have at least some!:)devil
 

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Some guy
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no , no they are not ! i just checked & there is no chamfer left!
Oops, you didn't mention the O-ring wire. The high dollar ARP taper ring compressors are narrowed to fit inside the wire, but many others are not. You may end up having to modify it to fit flush to the block, either with a lathe or belt sander or something?

One other one that I have as backup that is cheap and works well is a Lisle wrinkle band compressor,, around $12 or so, maybe even at local parts stores. It won't work with the O-ring wire without modification either.

 
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