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Nuclear Powered
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I guess this is only 1 percent....


http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/0228jail28-on.html

Report: More than 1 in every 100 Americans now behind bars
Associated Press
Feb. 28, 2008 09:52 AM

NEW YORK - For the first time in history, more than one in every 100 American adults is in jail or prison, according to a new report tracking the surge in inmate population and urging states to rein in corrections costs with alternative sentencing programs.

The report, released Thursday by the Pew Center on the States, said the 50 states spent more than $49 billion on corrections last year, up from less than $11 billion 20 years earlier. The rate of increase for prison costs was six times greater than for higher education spending, the report said.

Using updated state-by-state data, the report said 2,319,258 adults were held in U.S. prisons or jails at the start of 2008 - one out of every 99.1 adults, and more than any other country in the world.





The steadily growing inmate population "is saddling cash-strapped states with soaring costs they can ill afford and failing to have a clear impact either on recidivism or overall crime," said the report.

Susan Urahn, managing director of the Pew Center on the States, said budget woes are prompting officials in many states to consider new, cost-saving corrections policies that might have been shunned in the recent past for fear of appearing soft in crime.

"We're seeing more and more states being creative because of tight budgets," she said in an interview. "They want to be tough on crime, they want to be a law-and-order state - but they also want to save money, and they want to be effective."

The report cited Kansas and Texas as states which have acted decisively to slow the growth of their inmate population. Their actions include greater use of community supervision for low-risk offenders and employing sanctions other than reimprisonment for ex-offenders who commit technical violations of parole and probation rules.

"The new approach, born of bipartisan leadership, is allowing the two states to ensure they have enough prison beds for violent offenders while helping less dangerous lawbreakers become productive, taxpaying citizens," the report said.

While many state governments have shown bipartisan interest in curbing prison growth, there also are persistent calls to proceed cautiously.

"We need to be smarter," said David Muhlhausen, a criminal justice expert with the conservative Heritage Foundation. "We're not incarcerating all the people who commit serious crimes - but we're also probably incarcerating people who don't need to be."

According to the report, the inmate population increased last year in 36 states and the federal prison system.

The largest percentage increase - 12 percent - was in Kentucky, where Gov. Steve Beshear highlighted the cost of corrections in his budget speech last month. He noted that the state's crime rate had increased only about 3 percent in the past 30 years, while the state's inmate population has increased by 600 percent.

The Pew report was compiled by the Center on the State's Public Safety Performance Project, which is working directly with 13 states on developing programs to divert offenders from prison without jeopardizing public safety.

"For all the money spent on corrections today, there hasn't been a clear and convincing return for public safety," said the project's director, Adam Gelb. "More and more states are beginning to rethink their reliance on prisons for lower-level offenders and finding strategies that are tough on crime without being so tough on taxpayers."

The report said prison growth and higher incarceration rates do not reflect a parallel increase in crime or in the nation's overall population. Instead, it said, more people are behind bars mainly because of tough sentencing measures, such as "three-strikes" laws, that result in longer prison stays.

"For some groups, the incarceration numbers are especially startling," the report said. "While one in 30 men between the ages of 20 and 34 is behind bars, for black males in that age group the figure is one in nine."

The nationwide figures, as of Jan. 1, include 1,596,127 people in state and federal prisons and 723,131 in local jails - a total 2,319,258 out of almost 230 million American adults.

The report said the United States is the world's incarceration leader, far ahead of more populous China with 1.5 million people behind bars. It said the U.S. also is the leader in inmates per capita (750 per 100,000 people), ahead of Russia (628 per 100,000) and other former Soviet bloc nations which make up the rest of the Top 10.
 
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This is crazy. However the figures, from what I can gather, are slightly off.

Per the article there are approximtely, 2.2 million in jail or in prision and there are approximately 303 million people. This calculates 7/10 of 1 percent, which is still to high IMO.
 

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I guess this is only 1 percent....


http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/0228jail28-on.html

Report: More than 1 in every 100 Americans now behind bars
Associated Press
Feb. 28, 2008 09:52 AM

NEW YORK - For the first time in history, more than one in every 100 American adults is in jail or prison, according to a new report tracking the surge in inmate population and urging states to rein in corrections costs with alternative sentencing programs.

The report, released Thursday by the Pew Center on the States, said the 50 states spent more than $49 billion on corrections last year, up from less than $11 billion 20 years earlier. The rate of increase for prison costs was six times greater than for higher education spending, the report said.

Using updated state-by-state data, the report said 2,319,258 adults were held in U.S. prisons or jails at the start of 2008 - one out of every 99.1 adults, and more than any other country in the world.





The steadily growing inmate population "is saddling cash-strapped states with soaring costs they can ill afford and failing to have a clear impact either on recidivism or overall crime," said the report.

Susan Urahn, managing director of the Pew Center on the States, said budget woes are prompting officials in many states to consider new, cost-saving corrections policies that might have been shunned in the recent past for fear of appearing soft in crime.

"We're seeing more and more states being creative because of tight budgets," she said in an interview. "They want to be tough on crime, they want to be a law-and-order state - but they also want to save money, and they want to be effective."

The report cited Kansas and Texas as states which have acted decisively to slow the growth of their inmate population. Their actions include greater use of community supervision for low-risk offenders and employing sanctions other than reimprisonment for ex-offenders who commit technical violations of parole and probation rules.

"The new approach, born of bipartisan leadership, is allowing the two states to ensure they have enough prison beds for violent offenders while helping less dangerous lawbreakers become productive, taxpaying citizens," the report said.

While many state governments have shown bipartisan interest in curbing prison growth, there also are persistent calls to proceed cautiously.

"We need to be smarter," said David Muhlhausen, a criminal justice expert with the conservative Heritage Foundation. "We're not incarcerating all the people who commit serious crimes - but we're also probably incarcerating people who don't need to be."

According to the report, the inmate population increased last year in 36 states and the federal prison system.

The largest percentage increase - 12 percent - was in Kentucky, where Gov. Steve Beshear highlighted the cost of corrections in his budget speech last month. He noted that the state's crime rate had increased only about 3 percent in the past 30 years, while the state's inmate population has increased by 600 percent.

The Pew report was compiled by the Center on the State's Public Safety Performance Project, which is working directly with 13 states on developing programs to divert offenders from prison without jeopardizing public safety.

"For all the money spent on corrections today, there hasn't been a clear and convincing return for public safety," said the project's director, Adam Gelb. "More and more states are beginning to rethink their reliance on prisons for lower-level offenders and finding strategies that are tough on crime without being so tough on taxpayers."

The report said prison growth and higher incarceration rates do not reflect a parallel increase in crime or in the nation's overall population. Instead, it said, more people are behind bars mainly because of tough sentencing measures, such as "three-strikes" laws, that result in longer prison stays.

"For some groups, the incarceration numbers are especially startling," the report said. "While one in 30 men between the ages of 20 and 34 is behind bars, for black males in that age group the figure is one in nine."

The nationwide figures, as of Jan. 1, include 1,596,127 people in state and federal prisons and 723,131 in local jails - a total 2,319,258 out of almost 230 million American adults.

The report said the United States is the world's incarceration leader, far ahead of more populous China with 1.5 million people behind bars. It said the U.S. also is the leader in inmates per capita (750 per 100,000 people), ahead of Russia (628 per 100,000) and other former Soviet bloc nations which make up the rest of the Top 10.
Good!:D
 

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Desert Racing Widow
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I'd like to see how many of the "Americans" they list are illegal immigrants.
 

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I just heard the USA is five percent of the world population but we have twenty five percent of the worlds prisoners. I thought that was interesting.
 

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Fast fix

I just heard the USA is five percent of the world population but we have twenty five percent of the worlds prisoners. I thought that was interesting.
A good cure would be to turn them into an alternative fuel source :)coffee ;)
 

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Amazing to see those kind of numbers. Wonder why they jumped so high last year
 

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You who rock I salute you
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We can do like middle eastern countries do and just cut off their hands or public beatings & send them home instead of sitting in the can,, or execute for misdemeanors like in Iran and Libya.

Many European countries are slow to procecute if ever. Scandinavian countries even slower to deal with crime.
Places like Aruba, Grand Cayman ect are asleep at the justice wheel.

Or make the prisons far, way far more brutal like Japan, China and Singapore as a deterant.

-or faster executions like China, Cuba, Russia,,,

All the above will get the head count down.
 

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I see you all think everyone in jail is a POS but with a government that takes more and more from its people and continues to pass more laws to try to control the population it will only get worse. The real POS here is the justice system that is not capable of common sense and DA's trying to get there numbers up. (Look at the Duke case and this is more common than you know) I'll give you my only experience with this. My wife of 25 years became bipolar and started doing crazy things. the sheriffs had been to our house several times and knew of her problem. She calls 911 and a Sheriff shows up (later found out he was going through a divorce)and after a few minutes he tells me he is going to do me a favor and arrest her. While he has her handcuffed in her own home she says to me if she goes to jail I'm dead. (Remember she is bipolar) Long story short they charged her with making terrorist threats and intimidating a witness (her own husband) It played out in court for almost a year with over $5,000 in attorneys fees. She was convicted and referred to the mental health and probation system and killed herself two months later. My point is had all these a$$holes used common sense and referred her to medical help instead of forcing their rules on her I'm sure she would still be here.
 

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This is crazy. However the figures, from what I can gather, are slightly off.

Per the article there are approximtely, 2.2 million in jail or in prision and there are approximately 303 million people. This calculates 7/10 of 1 percent, which is still to high IMO.
G.A.F.L.
 

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About 500' AGL
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We can do like middle eastern countries do and just cut off their hands or public beatings & send them home instead of sitting in the can,, or execute for misdemeanors like in Iran and Libya.

Many European countries are slow to procecute if ever. Scandinavian countries even slower to deal with crime.
Places like Aruba, Grand Cayman ect are asleep at the justice wheel.

Or make the prisons far, way far more brutal like Japan, China and Singapore as a deterant.

-or faster executions like China, Cuba, Russia,,,

All the above will get the head count down.
I agree 100%. As Chris Rock once said, "When you're livin in an old project....a new prison aint that bad."
 

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Many European countries are slow to procecute if ever. Scandinavian countries even slower to deal with crime.

This couldn't be further from the truth. Most European countries average less than 2 homicides per 100,000. Scandinavian countries are even lower. Sweden is just over 1 per 100,000. Even their capital, Stockholm, is around 3 per 100,000. Every country has a problem with petty criminals. Compared to the US average of 6 homicides per 100,000 and metropolitan area homicide rates in the 10-20 per 100,000 nationwide, Sweden's, or Europe's for that matter, "crime problem" is a relatively minor annoyance in the grand scheme of things.

And, further, there has been ABSOLUTELY NO EMPIRICAL EVIDENCE, AT ALL, EVER, that stiff punishments are either a deterrent to crime or recidivism. Absolutely none. In fact, most countries, such as the US and Russia, with extremely stiff punishment and high percentage of it's citizinery imprisoned continue to experience no significant decrease in any type of crime.

Good theory though, except that it's entirely wrong.
 
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