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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I use the c shaped tool thing and tack weld them. Have been doing it that way for years. Never any issues.....
BUT that doesn't mean there isn't a better way.
Does anyone use loctite sleeve retainer on them? Or other stuff?
I worked for a guy that insisted we drill and tap a hole in the pump and have the thread of the bolt just go through the tube. It worked too... what a PITA
Wags

And what are you guys using for silicone? I have used ultra black for years. Always good luck. I was drinking with the big boat guys last night and they are using loctite 5900. They say zero leaks. Even with those 3 piece intakes for big chief heads. They swear by it.

Oh, I went to pick up 1 stock gen 6 windage tray bolt. a 36 pack later we all stubled out of there and I got to look at bad ass stuff. Boat 1 a 42' MTI cat with twin turbos going in... runs 155 ish now... the new engines should push it to 175 ish.!!! The next boat was a miniscule 36 to 40' tunnel and the trailer it was sitting on was a 60K trailer with 6 20" wheels, low profile tires, disc brakes, etc. The boat was cool too...Trailer was a work of art. They probably hadd 5 million dollars worth of boats sitting there. Nice stuff, not cabin cruisers.
 

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Right Stuff, its in a cheese squeez can, that stuff is better than any silicone.
I used the stuff one time. You're right, it didn't leak a drop. Of course I could have pulled all the aminfold bolts and thrown them away because you needed a 3 ft pry bar to remove the manifold. And that was with the stuff on the ends only. I can't imagine if I used it around the water ports.
Thats stuff isn't even allowed in the garage now.



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Right Stuff, its in a cheese squeez can, that stuff is better than any silicone.



Im a mechanic and thats all we use. And as far as needing a pry bar, never needed any more pressure to get intakes off with this stuff than any other. Personally though if it did grab that good whats the down side?
 

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Nothing if you never intend to get back in there. Perfect if your a mechanic, never what any chance in hell of a leak. I use the stuff too.
I don't glue my valve covers down because we need to get back in there every so often. Like EVERY RACE!
I know some one that used the stuff on a oil pan with studs. Now if he had used bolts, he MIGHT have been able to cut it with a utility knive. With studs it made it much tougher. Needless to say, he doesn't use it anymore either.
The OEMs use the hell out of it. I can fully understand why.
MAYBE, just maybe, if you let it skin enough, it might release. I let Ultra skin for 10-15 minutes and it doesn't even stick to the manifold when I lift it off. A little very thin smear of some new Ultra and its ready to reinstall.
Like I said, if you mean to leave it one their till your grand kids graduate, cool. I think the OP is into his stuff more frequent than that. Just a guess. Personally, I don't need something that bonds so well I could remove my engine by the manifold, AFTER THE BOLTS HAVE BEEN REMOVED. So there is, in some applications, a down side.



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Discussion Starter #13
"Silicon bronze and a tig"
I am assuming that is a standard rod? Any welding place has?
This will prevent the cracking of the weld?

Wags
 

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Gn7, what are you talking about when you say you let it "skin"?
If you let any room temperature rubber product cure long enough before assembly it cuts down considerably on the adhesion to the part being bolt on.Manifold, timing cover, what ever. It doesn't really effect the sealing all that much and makes disassembly much easier. Look at Felpro intake and head gaskets. The have a silicone bead on them but it isn't "wet".
"Silicon bronze and a tig"
I am assuming that is a standard rod? Any welding place has?
This will prevent the cracking of the weld?

Wags
Its as standard in a welding shop as any other brazing or welding rod. It can only be used with a tig.



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Used Right Stuff to put a differential cover on once, year later tried taking the cover off and literally destroyed the cover in the process. Won't ever use it again!
 

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The key to using "the right stuff" is making sure you only put it in places that you either never have to pull apart, or in places that can get a razor blade in. I always run the razor blade down the seam and everything will pull apart after that. you can also do as GN7 said and let it cure for a bit of time to reduce the adhesion. Honestly though most problems I see with regular silicone are related to people tightening down parts too soon and not letting the silicone set up some. With "the right stuff" its so nasty and sticky that you can put it on and immediately torque it down and it will not leak later, because it won't all squeeze out. Regular silicone works great if you let it set some before torquing it down, because then it won't all squeeze out the sides and develop leaks where the silicone escaped. Also "the right stuff" doesn't care if you suck at cleaning sealing surfaces, regular silicone definitely does. I primarily attribute sealing problems, no matter what product was used, to the prep and procedure used when putting everything together.
 

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sort of, its almost exactly like soldering.....so you could do it with a torch also. But then again, you can also basically "tig" with a torch.
Its nothing like soldering. It can be done with a torch and the right flux, but it sucks. I rather use plain brass brazing rod.
I would say anything that can be done with a MIG isn't classified as soldering, nor would I say anything done at these TIG amperages qualifies as soldering.
LINK: Silicone braze


Harris classifies it as WELDING



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The key to using "the right stuff" is making sure you only put it in places that you either never have to pull apart, or in places that can get a razor blade in. I always run the razor blade down the seam and everything will pull apart after that. you can also do as GN7 said and let it cure for a bit of time to reduce the adhesion. Honestly though most problems I see with regular silicone are related to people tightening down parts too soon and not letting the silicone set up some. With "the right stuff" its so nasty and sticky that you can put it on and immediately torque it down and it will not leak later, because it won't all squeeze out. Regular silicone works great if you let it set some before torquing it down, because then it won't all squeeze out the sides and develop leaks where the silicone escaped. Also "the right stuff" doesn't care if you suck at cleaning sealing surfaces, regular silicone definitely does. I primarily attribute sealing problems, no matter what product was used, to the prep and procedure used when putting everything together.
:))THumbsUp
Its like using 3M Marine sealant. Killer stuff, but plan on having your gel coat pulled off with it if you ever need to remove anything.



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