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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, I'm a first time jet boat owner (just outboards in the past). I bought a boat with a Berkely jet this summer and just now realized there are oil fill holes in the bowl. The Berkely "manual" that I got seems to have neglected this, it focuses more on power curves and how to go faster instead of useless things like basic maintenance.

Anyway, after adding most of a bottle of gear oil, I noticed that all of it was running out the intake onto the ground. Oops! The bowl end cap is in place and not leaking, so I suspect the bowl seal. Had to read some forum posts to find that much, as again the manual is less than helpful.

I don't know how long it's been like that, prior owner said he "rebuilt" the engine (based on how loose all the bolts were, I suspect he just kind of threw the engine parts in a pile and shook until combined). I don't know when or if the jet has ever been rebuilt. The shaft doesn't have any play when I try to wiggle it through the hand hole. I have had the boat out a few times (apparently with dry bowl) since I bought it.

I'm wondering what my options are to address this. Ideally the "correct" option is to disassemble the bowl and replace the seal, but I'm not entirely clear on how that's done. I watched some Berkely videos that are mainly about rebuilding from scratch, and it seems like there are special punches or tools needed. Are those available somewhere, or able to be hacked together out of common garage tools? I've also heard people say to fill the bowl with something like axle grease instead of oil, or to remove the "Bowl Plug" (is this the same as the End Cap?) and let water get in there to lube and cool things. I'm not sure what the best option is at this point, or how many other things might be damaged from an unknown amount of use without oil in the bowl.
 

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If the oil you are putting in is leaking out of the intake, yes, the seal is shot or missing altogether. Although not desirable, this is not the end of the world for a pump. You will almost always find water in the bowl cavity, usually mixed with oil. I personally use gear oil as opposed to axle grease. Every couple of times out, I just refill the cavity. Running without any lubricant in the cavity in the short term won't do much damage. In the long term, it will wear out the bushings and possibly the shaft, so deal with it sooner than later.

In order to change that particular seal, you won't need any specialty tools. Simply remove the bowl, dig out what's left of the failed seal and install a replacement. If you feel the need to dig deeper into the pump(i.e. remove impeller), you will need a couple of special tools. I remember reading somewhere that a marine vendor had a tool rental program a while back, but which vendor escapes me at the moment. Depending on what you have available, you can also make your own tools for the task.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·

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The inside of the bowls are identical. If you use the rubber bodied seal, you can almost install it by hand. You could certainly tap it in using a socket and extension without too much trouble, negating the need for the seal driver if that is all you are going to do.
 

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I just had to do this and it is a pretty easy job. The seal was not seated in the bowl. Sucks you have to take it apart and reseal it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Sounds great, thanks for the help! I ordered a new seal (the kit that includes new packing gland material, since that leaks too).
 

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A few options. American turbine does a water lube. There are no seals in the bowl. Water pressure between bearing and shaft.

If using the Berkeley with seal. The high pressure side is the impeller side. If you install the seal with the lip towards the oil cavity the water will push past the seal and mix with the gear oil, eventually making it all water.

be safe, schick
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I got my bowl off and replaced the seal (old one was possibly the wrong part, didn't look anything like the replacement). The transom housing sure is a $%^&% to get back on afterwards, I had to really force the bottom end to get it snug up to the hull.

The good news is it doesn't leak any more! The bowl reservoir holds oil now.

On the minus side, this is what my pump shaft looks like after unknown years of running with the wrong bowl seal and no oil:

Wood Bicycle part Cylinder Auto part Gas

Not sure if there are supposed to be bearings under the bowl seal? Parts list indicates bearings but the video I linked earlier just says bushings. I think I have bushings currently.
 

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shaft is junk, check behind seal and see what the bushings look like the bowl is probably eaten out also and will need replacing, i have used shafts and C bowls $125 shaft $125 bowl, another $75.00 and i'll install new bushings, seal and a new bowl gasket. Buyer pays shipping or free pickup Jim 1818-890-1867
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
shaft is junk, check behind seal and see what the bushings look like the bowl is probably eaten out also and will need replacing, i have used shafts and C bowls $125 shaft $125 bowl, another $75.00 and i'll install new bushings, seal and a new bowl gasket. Buyer pays shipping or free pickup Jim 1818-890-1867
I'm tempted, I'm in Minnesota, not sure how far you are?

I also don't know how hard it is to replace the shaft, it looks like I need to take the entire unit out of the boat to get it out. Does your pump shaft have the thrust bearing installed? If not I think I also need a special bearing tool (not sure where those come from, I don't see one on the Berkely site) and a hydraulic press (which I don't have). I haven't found another video explaining how to do this for beginners, anyone know if there's a more comprehensive guide on that?

This is what the inside of the bowl looks like with the bushings / bearings (still not sure what they're properly called, as Berkeley seems to go back and forth on what these are).

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Rim Gas Automotive wheel system

Camera lens Wood Cameras & optics Lens Camera accessory
 
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