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Discussion Starter #1
these little things are really startin to irritate me, apperently people arent doing good enough jobs checking boats leaving the already infested lakes so they get transferred to a new lake, the only people i have seen do a good job is the border stop comin from havasu back to the river
 

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Amber Racing Services
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Definately something to worry about.

Areas of the Great Lakes have reported that entire marinas and beaches are infected damaging docks, and beaching areas ...

I doubt it will happen overnight, but we will probably see it happen since it's been introducted to the Colorado River system.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quagga_mussel
 

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Angry American
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since you brought up the subject of Quagga Mussels, here's the news letter from DFG on how we as boaters can help. As you can see by the date, this has been going on for awhile now.-

Boaters Asked to Help Stop Spread of Quagga Mussel
Boating recreation is at risk

Aug. 31, 2007
Contact:
Kyle Orr, Department of Fish and Game (916) 322-8958
Pete Weisser, Department of Water Resources (916) 653-3350
Sheryl Watson, California State Parks (916) 654-7538
Gloria Sandoval, Department of Boating and Waterways (916) 263-0788 (Spanish)

Multiple state departments are collectively urging boaters and watercraft users to help stop the spread of Quagga mussels along the Colorado River and into California. Particular waters of interest include Riverside County’s Lake Skinner and San Diego County’s Lower Otay Reservoir, Lake Dixon, and San Vicente Reservoir, all of which permit recreational access.
"With Quagga mussels on the move from the Nevada border to inland San Diego County, we need the public’s help to keep them from going farther," said Secretary for Resources Mike Chrisman. "Once the Quagga are established in a waterway, they have significant environmental, recreational and economic impacts."
Although they range from microscopic to the size of a fingernail, the mussels are prolific breeders and attach themselves to hard and soft surfaces, such as boats and aquatic plants.
Quagga mussels affect boaters negatively because they:
  • Ruin your engine by blocking the cooling system - causing overheating.
  • Increase drag on the bottom of your boat, reducing speed and wasting fuel.
  • Jam steering equipment on boats.
  • Require scraping and repainting of boat bottoms.
  • Colonize all underwater substrates such as boat ramps, docks, lines and other underwater surfaces requiring constant cleaning.
Quagga mussel infestation can potentially lead to the closure of boating in affected waterways. They also wreak havoc with the environment, disrupting the natural food chain and releasing toxins that affect other species. Spread of the Quagga could result in millions of dollars in damage to water transport facilities.
Various watercraft are the primary transporters of Quagga mussels. All boaters and anyone who accesses freshwater aquatic environments should take the following steps to inhibit the spread of the Quagga mussel:
  • Inspect all exposed surfaces - small mussels feel like sandpaper to the touch.
  • Wash the hull of each watercraft thoroughly, preferably with high pressure/hot water.
  • Remove all plants and animal material.
  • Drain all water and dry all areas.
  • Drain and dry the lower outboard unit.
  • Clean and dry all live-wells.
  • Empty and dry any buckets.
  • Dispose of all bait in the trash.
  • Wait five days and keep watercraft dry between launches into different fresh waters.
It is important for boaters to follow these steps and cooperate with vessel inspections that are being conducted at a number of Department of Food and Agriculture border inspection stations and around the state.
These invasive freshwater mollusks were first detected in California in January 2007, in Lake Havasu on the Colorado River. In subsequent months, they were found in two Southern California water systems using Colorado River water, the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California (MWD) and the San Diego County Water Authority.
MWD documented the mussels in March and again in July in its 242-mile Colorado River aqueduct, and also at Lake Mathews near Riverside and at Lake Skinner in Winchester, east of Temecula. On Aug. 21, the mussels were discovered in San Diego County, at San Vicente Reservoir near Lakeside.
Thus far, the mussels have not been found in California's State Water Project (SWP), which draws its water from Northern California watersheds. Environmental scientists are monitoring the system, the largest water and power system in the United States. The main risk of mussel introduction in the SWP is from trailered boats.
A multi-agency taskforce that includes the Department of Fish and Game, the Department of Boating and Waterways, the Department of Water Resources and California State Parks has responded with surface and underwater inspectors to determine the extent of the Quagga threat. For more information on the Quagga mussel response, visit the DFG Web site at www.dfg.ca.gov/invasives/quaggamussel.
A public toll-free number, 1-866-440-9530, has been established for boaters and anyone involved with activities on lakes and rivers seeking information on the invasive and destructive Quagga mussels. The toll-free number is available Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
 

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Angry American
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3,103 Posts
here's a pic and some more info-



Quagga Mussels

Discovered in January 2007 at Lake Mead, non-native quagga mussels have caused quite a stir in Southern Nevada. Similar to its cousin, the zebra mussel, the quagga mussel is described by scientists as one of the most invasive species worldwide and can live at depths of nearly 400 feet.
Sometimes referred to as "biological pollution," species like the quagga mussel can cause irreversible harm to the environment. Quaggas pose a serious threat to the ecosystem as well as the water intake system located at Lake Mead.
Quaggas filter up to a liter of water per day, impacting the food chain of native fish and other aquatic wildlife by decreasing the food supply. They also clog and restrict water flow in pipes of all sizes, requiring costly upkeep and repairs. To make matters worse, they multiply at an alarming rate. A single female quagga can produce more than one million eggs in a spawning season.

Quaggas in Lake Mead
Initially discovered in Boulder Basin, the mussels also are in the Lake Mead fish hatchery and Callville Bay, according to the Nevada Department of Wildlife.
The Southern Nevada Water Authority (SNWA) has established a monitoring program that includes regular diver inspections of its facilities. To date, no adult quaggas have been found at SNWA treatment facilities. However, veligers (quagga larvae) have been found in the raw water as it comes into the plant. It should be noted that SNWA's water treatment processes destroy all quaggas before they can get into the drinking water system.

Preventing infestation
Perhaps the best way to control the quagga mussel is through prevention. The quagga moves from one body of water to another in bait buckets or bilge water or by attaching themselves to boat hulls and trailers.
In addition, a chemical treatment system is already in place on Intake 2, and SNWA treatment managers are evaluating the options for treatment on Intake 1 to control the species.
With the goal of preventing the further spread of the quagga, agencies across the West are working to establish protocols for cleaning boats and other marine equipment and increase public awareness.
On the national front, a bill was recently introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives by Rep. Jon Porter of Nevada, giving the National Park Service the authority to combat invasive species like the quagga mussel beyond park borders.

 

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jetboataholic
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:)violent44Stay the hell away from my area!!!!!:)violent44

Where did they come from? How did they get here? I've never heard of them. They sound pretty bad!
 

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jetboataholic
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Thanks! Eyes skipped over that one somehow. Very informative.

:)violent44Stay the hell away from my area!!!!!:)violent44
 

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We have over 12,000 lakes and 84,000 miles of rivers. I was reading through the reports and we've had zebra for a while now, and quagga only recently. I can't remember anything from the DNR about controlling these. When you look at a map, Pennsylvania isn't all that bad, Lake Erie seems to have the bulk of it, but then you look at New York. They have what appears to be the highest rate of infestation and apparently aren't worried about it. Those things are so easily transported and the amount of people that can boat Erie one day and the Susquehanna the next is staggering. So if NY isn't doing shtt about it, all the neighboring states are going to fall victim.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
you have a good point, but it does irritate me that the river is the only place ive been that checks, went to castaic yesterday and they asked if i knew what they where on the way in but did not check on the way out... and then they wonder why they get transfered
 

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Highaboosta
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There's a lake that I've gone to in northern Mi. called Glen Lake and when you pull in to launch your boat they pressure wash the bottom of the boat to make sure you didn't bring any critters with you from another lake.

Now if they just started doing that with people...................:)bulb
 

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Cas, your quote says they discovered the Quaggas' in Lake Mead in January of 07. Let me tell you that by November of 07, they are EVERYWHERE in that lake. I did quite a bit of diving in Lake Mead in the last 1/2 of 07, and Kingman Wash is covered. We did some diving over in Horsepower Cove, and everything down there is covered too.

These things are spreading like wildfire.
 

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Pulled a good sized (almost 2") hitchhiker off of our speedo Saturday. Now we have a working speedo again.

We made sure him and his friend got cooked by the sun and suffered.
 

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Boarder Inspection Peeps

First off let me say I'm not trying to make light of this issue.
Kona/and all I have to tell you my boarder inspection story, last october I was towing a 18' tahiti down to JBP (HULL ONLY, jet boat-no jet either) when I hit the cali boarder, the inspector orange cones my line and informs me she need to inspect my boat. She goes over my boat for long enougph that people start bailing out of that line. After a few minutes she comes to my window and asks me"what lake are you coming from today sir?" For the first time I could remember I was completly speechless...... looking back on it I wish I'd have said something like -lake sink-em quick. I guess my point is maybe the boarder inspectors should at least have a double didgit IQ , OMG- BTW true story.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
wow... that is pretty bad, maybe she thought it was a paddle boat :D
 

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jetboataholic
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hil:)hil:)hil:)hil:)hil:)
 

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The inspection at two local lakes here require high pressure was before launch with 140* water, hmmm wonder how that'll be with some custom paint and such ?? Tom
 

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there are 3 lakes up here that won't allow boats from a few counties to even launch...restrictions are getting tighter already.
Funny part around here is, lots of us "beach launch" and/or have secluded private ramps, our Ramp at Nac is 20 miles from nowhere :D

Hey wonder if qwaggas eat Hydrilla weed?? then we could introduce Northern pike to eat muscles the rotenone (sp) to Kill the fish ??
 
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