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Will I harm my engine if I run it in saltwater a few times for several hours at a time? I know about flushing with freshwater to prevent corrosion, but I wonder about salt crystallization blocking the water passages. The boat runs at the bottom of the gauge in the lakes, below 165, but I have no idea about the actual temps in the heads.

What temp does the saltwater begin to form crystals?
 

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Run it and don't worry about it. You can flush it with salt away using a low water pickup adapter for the drive, or even better, take it and drop it in the lake and run it around like normal after you're done playing in the big blue. Running in salt really isn't that big of a deal and is realistically harder on your trailer than anything. ;)
 

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The Insurance Guy
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Here's a related question: what about the salt water running through the intercooler on my blower motor? I know it would get flushed with everything else, but just concerns me.
 

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"On the road again..."
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Run it and don't worry about it. You can flush it with salt away using a low water pickup adapter for the drive, or even better, take it and drop it in the lake and run it around like normal after you're done playing in the big blue. Running in salt really isn't that big of a deal and is realistically harder on your trailer than anything. ;)
X 2, especially on the trailer issue.

I'm in saltwater more than fresh here on the coast. Just flush it really well, hose everything down as possible, and you're good to go.

Also make sure all your sacrificial zinc annodes are in good shape if you have them. This will keep electrolysis from effecting things
 

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27 Victory 800efi
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Here's a related question: what about the salt water running through the intercooler on my blower motor? I know it would get flushed with everything else, but just concerns me.
Whipple intercoolers are made from a copper-nickel alloy which is very very resistant to saltwater corrosion. Just flush it with the motor and you shouldnt ever have a problem.
-Tom
 

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The Insurance Guy
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Whipple intercoolers are made from a copper-nickel alloy which is very very resistant to saltwater corrosion. Just flush it with the motor and you shouldnt ever have a problem.
-Tom
Do you flush immediately when you pull out of the water (i.e. take a hose with you to the ramp) or is it ok to wait until you get home?
 

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27 Victory 800efi
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Do you flush immediately when you pull out of the water (i.e. take a hose with you to the ramp) or is it ok to wait until you get home?
Some will say flush it right when you pull it out of the water. I always just do it when I get home, no need to have that hassle at the busy launch ramp. I'm assuming you have a 496 with a whipple? In theory, because your motor has cast iron heads and block, there would be no galvanic corrosion. It's when you have the aluminum heads with cast iron block that electrolysis will occur and eat away at the aluminum heads. Even then, it's a slow process so no need to hurry.

So to answer the original question, don't worry about running in saltwater. The salt wont build up in the water passages. Just run the motor on the hose until the water coming out of the exhaust doesn't taste salty.
 

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The Insurance Guy
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I'm assuming you have a 496 with a whipple? In theory, because your motor has cast iron heads and block, there would be no galvanic corrosion. It's when you have the aluminum heads with cast iron block that electrolysis will occur and eat away at the aluminum heads. Even then, it's a slow process so no need to hurry.
yeah, it's an HO with a whipple...think I will bring the hose though next time just to be extra safe. The ramp in Santa Barbara is super quiet, so it's not really a problem with getting in peoples way and such
 
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