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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I replaced my transom about 2 years ago and my floor, there was a hack battery mount job on one of the stringers so I drilled in a few spots and it was all good, so I filled the holes with some dowels and resin and away I went...... running my boat with my 3 point mount. I have short motor stringers in my boat about 5 feet long - and then a center stringer than runs from the bilge area all the way to the bow-

2 years later and I want to upgrade to a rail kit, no problem..... until I remove the three point mount and discover that the stringer I did not check is mush city!:)st Damm me for not checking both stringers when I did the floor and transom....this is my first jet, so I have learned a few hard lessons.

My question is, has anyone used seacast? It is a pourable fiber mix used for stringer repair and transom repair. Supposed to be three times as strong as plywood and it is waterproof so it will never rot. You can cut the top off of a stringer and remove the rotted wood and then pour the mix and use the old fiberglass as a mold, then you are supposed to cap it with some fiberglass matte...

I know I could cut out the old stringer, tab in a new one..blah blah blah....

I was just curious if anyone has used this product or knows someone who has? I am not a short cut taker, but if this stuff is 3 times stronger and will never rot again I figure it might be a good way to repair this for the long term....

Hoping a boat shop reads this and knows the product or maybe another garage hack like me
 

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Never heard of it could be a good idea i guess , but will it flex a lil when needed or will it stress the hull being it is 3 times stronger than the old flexed out hull? Could cause cracks......

Im just thinking out loud here i wouldnt do it, however i have seen a thread on another site years ago where they did as you said above. Cut the tops and add new wood and glass back over it.........

I willl try to find it

Edit, i found the seacast and it says almost 3 times stronger then PLYWOOD Do you have plywood stringers ?????

http://www.invisionboatworks.com/stringers.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yeah I am not sure how much stringers flex? As far as temptature wise they claim that the product "maintains resiliency at freezing temperatures and does not creep at elevated temperatures".

I thought about dropping a new piece of wood into it as well, if you find the thread let me know as I amy end up going that route
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
wood rot is like cancer, it just keep spreading. I know it is a total pain in the ass, but if you want to keep the boat, just replace the stringer.
Trust me, I know this after replacing the transom, removing 250 #'s of soggy foam beneath my floor and replacing the floor itself....

I am just frustrated by finding another rotten piece of wood....:mad:
 

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I feel your pain. I decided to never put "organic" (wood) material back under the floor. So I made "synthetic" stringers out of divinicel. So far so good, but I've only had 2 seasons on them.

Everyone has good points about the flex characteristics being different. You won't get any ez answer to this question. An extreme difference in flex, like putting a metal stringer onto a fiberglass hull would certainly create new issues. But the whole purpose of a stringer is to stiffen up the hull because the shell isn't stiff at all.

My .02 would be that if you try that product, then maybe look at the fillets where the stringer glass joins the hull. If you add more filler here to make the fillets bigger and then glass that joint some more, you are going to spread the load better and create a better transition from the flex of the hull to the stiffer stringer.
 
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