Performance Boats Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The past couple of times I've started the boat in my driveway, small pieces of rubber have come flying out of the exhaust. Not a ton, but enough to be noticeable. All the pieces have a rounded shape to them, which leads to believe they are parts of a hose that is deteriorating. Here is a picture of the largest piece that's come out, along with some smaller pieces. What do you guys think?
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
25,975 Posts
The past couple of times I've started the boat in my driveway, small pieces of rubber have come flying out of the exhaust. Not a ton, but enough to be noticeable. All the pieces have a rounded shape to them, which leads to believe they are parts of a hose that is deteriorating. Here is a picture of the largest piece that's come out, along with some smaller pieces. What do you guys think?
That's what it is. Time to call Rex Marine.



100% free webcam site! | Awesome chicks and it is absolutely free! | Watch free live sex cam - easy as 1-2-3
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,040 Posts
When was the last time that ALL of the hoses were replaced? Hard to tell from pix but it looks like exhaust hose delaminating from inside. Could also be cooling hoses to/from exhaust logs. I'd say replace all of them. Start at the cooling water thru-hull hose and repalce them all.

Could save you an overheated engine or possible sinking if you lost a thru-hull intake hose.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
25,975 Posts
When was the last time that ALL of the hoses were replaced? Hard to tell from pix but it looks like exhaust hose delaminating from inside. Could also be cooling hoses to/from exhaust logs. I'd say replace all of them. Start at the cooling water thru-hull hose and repalce them all.

Could save you an overheated engine or possible sinking if you lost a thru-hull intake hose.
Good call Carl. That could very well be cooling hose coming apart, and that would have a tendency to clog up some stuff if allowed to continue. Replacing all the small cooling hose would be cheap insurance at this stage. :))THumbsUp



100% free webcam site! | Awesome chicks and it is absolutely free! | Watch free live sex cam - easy as 1-2-3
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the input guys. I had actually already replaced all the coolant hoses on Saturday, but wanted your opinions as to what it may be before I take it out this coming weekend. That way if you all thought it might be something else I could take care of it before heading out. We'll see how it goes this weekend.

CampbellCarl: Funny you should mention the through hull exhaust hose. The first time I took the boat out it started taking on water because there was a hole, unbeknownst to me, in the hose. Thankfully I made it out of the water without sinking. Needless to say, that was replaced right away.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,312 Posts
Holes in exhaust hose is one of the main reasons to always make sure that you have beer cans on board at all times!!! I had to make a beer can patch on one of my exhaust hoses years ago to get me through the day with out sinking...:))THumbsUp

Steve
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Just cut all the old hoses open lengthwise to see what they look like inside and none of them had any indication of pieces missing like shown in the picture at the top. They had some slight buildup, but no pitting or visible chunks missing. This concerns me as now it appears that the source of the rubber chunks was not the coolant hoses themselves after all.

The rubber had to have come from somewhere in the cooling tract, so here is the path it takes.
- Water is scooped up from under the boat and passes through the water pump. I already disassembled the water pump to see if the impeller was falling apart and it was totally fine.
- Next the water flows through a transmission cooler. The trans cooler is quite old and I have no idea what the construction of it looks like on the inside.
- From there, the water goes through the V-Drive, which, like trans cooler, I have no clue what the water routing looks like inside of it.
- Next the water passes through a T-Spliter and into the rear of each exhaust manifold. (Edelbrock M2)
- The water appears to make a 90 degree turn to come right out another fitting at the back of the exhaust manifolds and into the front of each cylinder bank. I'm not sure why the water takes this path instead of just going straight into the engine block, so if anyone knows please enlighten me.
- Next the water goes into the front of each cylinder bank and flows through the block.
- Water exits the block at the top through a T-Spliter and into the rear of each exhaust manifold to be blasted out the back of the boat.

If the issue isn't the coolant hoses themselves, then it has to be one of these other components. After replacing all the hoses I ran the boat with a garden hose attached in the driveway for about 10 minutes. 5 minutes of that time was spent at 3,000 - 3,500 rpm to try to build up some heat. Engine stayed at 120 degrees the entire time. When in the water and running, it usually operates at 160 degrees, so 120 is quite cool. This leads me to believe it may have something to do with the trans cooler or V-Drive as neither one is engaged in the driveway, but are when running it in the water; which is where it has been overheating.

Any ideas?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
272 Posts
Just cut all the old hoses open lengthwise to see what they look like inside and none of them had any indication of pieces missing like shown in the picture at the top. They had some slight buildup, but no pitting or visible chunks missing. This concerns me as now it appears that the source of the rubber chunks was not the coolant hoses themselves after all.

The rubber had to have come from somewhere in the cooling tract, so here is the path it takes.
- Water is scooped up from under the boat and passes through the water pump. I already disassembled the water pump to see if the impeller was falling apart and it was totally fine.
- Next the water flows through a transmission cooler. The trans cooler is quite old and I have no idea what the construction of it looks like on the inside.
- From there, the water goes through the V-Drive, which, like trans cooler, I have no clue what the water routing looks like inside of it.
- Next the water passes through a T-Spliter and into the rear of each exhaust manifold. (Edelbrock M2)
- The water appears to make a 90 degree turn to come right out another fitting at the back of the exhaust manifolds and into the front of each cylinder bank. I'm not sure why the water takes this path instead of just going straight into the engine block, so if anyone knows please enlighten me.
- Next the water goes into the front of each cylinder bank and flows through the block.
- Water exits the block at the top through a T-Spliter and into the rear of each exhaust manifold to be blasted out the back of the boat.

If the issue isn't the coolant hoses themselves, then it has to be one of these other components. After replacing all the hoses I ran the boat with a garden hose attached in the driveway for about 10 minutes. 5 minutes of that time was spent at 3,000 - 3,500 rpm to try to build up some heat. Engine stayed at 120 degrees the entire time. When in the water and running, it usually operates at 160 degrees, so 120 is quite cool. This leads me to believe it may have something to do with the trans cooler or V-Drive as neither one is engaged in the driveway, but are when running it in the water; which is where it has been overheating.

Any ideas?
I found that my engine runs cooler with a hose, about the same 120. It will always be warmer under load. V-drive has no rubber. You might have a clog from a piece of the rubber. Undo the hoses and back flush each componet.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,360 Posts
Looks like exhaust coupler hose to me.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
25,975 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I took a look in the through hull exhaust ports from the outside of the boat with a flashlight and found that the brand new hose I put on has already started to come apart after only one time out. Granted, the engine ran hot at about 180 degrees the whole time. The hose is Shield's Marine Hose series 200 (Marine Exhaust/Water Hose (No Wire) - Series No. 200 | SeaStar Solutions), which is rated at 200 degree continuous usage and 250 degree intermittent. Even if the engine wasn't running hot, would this hose be adequate? Seems like a low temperature rating to me.

Do you guys have any recommendations for wet exhaust hose? I'm currently considering installing Trident Marine #202V (Trident Marine: Wet Exhaust Hose) which has a temp rating of 350.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Response from Shields Hose Product Manager at SeaStar Solutions

Chris, my name is Jen Reid and I am the Internet Marketing Coordinator for SeaStar Solutions. I contacted our Shields Product Manager in order to offer some assistance to you... Here's what he said:

Chris,

Chris I am the product manager for Sea Star Solutions Shields hose products. The Series 200 hose has a normal operating range up to 200 F continuous. If your temperatures ran at or below 200F or did not exceed 250 F for more than 15 minutes you may have a defective piece. We would replace the hose no charge. An easy way to tell is run your fingers over the inside of the hose. If they come back black and charred it means the hose was run at temperatures above the designed limits. You need to check your exhaust elbow to make sure all of the water passages are clear. If one or more are clogged you can get extreme hot spots inside the exhaust.

Silicone exhaust hose from either Shields or Trident will give you an extra measure of protection however remember the exhaust exiting your engine can exceed 1200 F and has to be properly cooled before it enters any hose.

**Please let me know if you have any further questions or concerns. We are here to help you! Thanks so much!

Jen Reid
[email protected]

Jim Lombardi, Shields Product Manager
[email protected]
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top