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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Navigating a Narrow Channel

This Post is meant to enlighten us all and for no other reason!!!!!! I was amazed to find this regulation and will be taking a boater safety course soon. I have been boating on the Colorado River for 40 years and never knew this. My guess is I'm not alone. Makes me think of what else I don't know about boaters safety.




— INLAND—
Steering and Sailing Rules
RULE 9
Narrow Channels
(a) (I) A vessel proceeding along the course of a narrow channel or fairway shall keep as near to the outer limit of the channel or fair way which lies on her starboard side as is safe and practicable.
(ii) Notwithstanding paragraph (a)(i) and Rule 14(a), a power- driven vessel operating in narrow channels or fairways on the Great Lakes, Western Rivers, or waters specified by the Secretary, and proceeding downbound with a following current shall have the right-of-way over an upbound vessel, shall pro pose the manner and place of passage, and shall initiate the maneuvering signals prescribed by Rule 34(a)(i), as appropriate. The vessel proceeding upbound against the current shall hold as necessary to permit safe passing.
(b) A vessel of less than 20 meters in length or a sailing vessel shall not impede the passage of a vessel that can safely navigate only within a narrow channel or fairway.
(c) A vessel engaged in fishing shall not impede the passage of any other vessel navigating within a narrow channel or fairway.
(d) A vessel shall not cross a narrow channel or fairway if such crossing impedes the passage of a vessel which can safely navigate only within that channel or fairway. The latter vessel shall use the danger signal prescribed in Rule 34(d) if in doubt as to the intention of the crossing vessel.
(e) (i) In a narrow channel or fairway when overtaking, the power- driven vessel intending to overtake another power-driven vessel shall indicate her intention by sounding the appropriate signal prescribed in Rule 34(c) and take steps to permit safe passing. The power-driven vessel being overtaken, if in agree ment, shall sound the same signal and may, if specifically agreed to take steps to permit safe passing. If in doubt she shall sound the danger signal prescribed in Rule 34(d).
(ii) This Rule does not relieve the overtaking vessel of her oblig ation under Rule 13.
(f) A vessel nearing a bend or an area of a narrow channel or fair way where other vessels may be obscured by an intervening obstruc tion shall navigate with particular alertness and caution and shall sound the appropriate signal prescribed in Rule 34(e).
(g) Every vessel shall, if the circumstances of the case admit, avoid anchoring in a narrow channel.
21


—INLAND—
Sound and Light Signals
RULE 34
Maneuvering and Warning Signals
(a) When power-driven vessels are in sight of one another and meeting or crossing at a distance within half a mile of each other, each vessel underway, when maneuvering as authorized or required by these Rules:
(i) shall indicate that maneuver by the following signals on her whistle: one short blast to mean “I intend to leave you on my port side”; two shtht blasts to mean “1 intend to leave you on my starboard side”; and three short blasts to mean “I am operating astern propulsion”.
(ii) upon hearing the one or two blast signal of the other shall, if in agreement, sound the same whistle signal and take the steps necessary to effect a safe passing. If, however, from any cause, the vessel doubts the safety of the proposed maneuver, she shall sound the danger signal specified in paragraph (d) of this Rule and each vessel shall take appropriate precautionary action until a safe passing agreement is made.
(b) A vessel may supplement the whistle signals prescribed in para graph (a) of this Rule by light signals:
(i) These signals shall have the following significance: one flash to mean “I intend to leave you on my port side”; two flashes to mean “I intend to leave you on my starboard side”; three flash es to mean “I am operating astern propulsion”;
(ii) The duration of each flash shall be about 1 second; and
(iii) The light used for this signal shall, if fitted, be one all-round white or yellow light, visible at a minimum range of 2 miles, syn chronized with the whistle, and shall comply with the provisions of Annex I to these Rules.
117

—INLAND
Sound and Light Signals
RULE 34—CONTINUED
(c) When in sight of one another:
(i) a power-driven vessel intending to overtake another power- driven vessel shall indicate her intention by the following signals on her whistle: one short blast to mean “I intend to overtake you on your starboard side”; two short blasts to mean “I intend to overtake you on your port side”; and
(ii) the power-driven vessel about to be overtaken shall, if in agreement, sound a similar sound signal. If in doubt she shall sound the danger signal prescribed in paragraph (d).
(d) When vessels in sight of one another are approaching each other and from any cause either vessel fails to understand the inten tions or actions of the other, or is in doubt whether sufficient action is being taken by the other to avoid collision, the vessel in doubt shall immediately indicate such doubt by giving at least five short and rapid blasts on the whistle. This signal may be supplemented by a light signal of at least five short and rapid flashes.
(e) A vessel nearing a bend or an area of a channel or fairway where other vessels may be obscured by an intervening obstruction shall sound one prolonged blast. This signal shall be answered with a prolonged blast by any approaching vessel that may be within hearing around the bend or behind the intervening obstruction.
(f) If whistles are fitted on a vessel at a distance apart of more than 100 meters, one whistle only shall be used for giving maneuvering and warning signals.
(g) When a power-driven vessel is leaving a dock or berth, she shall sound one prolonged blast.
(h) A vessel that reaches agreement with another vessel in a head on, crossing, or overtaking situation, as for example, by using the radiotelephone as prescribed by the Vessel Bridge-to-Bridge Radiotelephone Act (85 Stat. 164; 33 U.S.C. 1201 et seq.), is not obliged to sound the whistle signals prescribed by this Rule, but may do so. If agreement is not reached, then whistle signals shall be exchanged in a timely manner and shall prevail.
119

This is Federal regulations for inland waters in the Western regains, rivers and lakes. I found out that the Local Sheriffs Dept. can not enforce these laws but BLM can and if the rules are not followed and something happens the law will be enforced. :|err:|err:|err

If we all do this while in the Gorge there will be so many horns and whistles sounding, no one will know what to do. And as my friend Kenny said we will all get flipped off a lot. So just be as safe as you can.
 

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The HMFIC
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1,711 Posts
This Post is meant to enlighten us all and for no other reason!!!!!! I was amazed to find this regulation and will be taking a boater safety course soon. I have been boating on the Colorado River for 40 years and never knew this. My guess is I'm not alone. Makes me think of what else I don't know about boaters safety.




— INLAND—
Steering and Sailing Rules
RULE 9
Narrow Channels
(a) (I) A vessel proceeding along the course of a narrow channel or fairway shall keep as near to the outer limit of the channel or fair way which lies on her starboard side as is safe and practicable.
(ii) Notwithstanding paragraph (a)(i) and Rule 14(a), a power- driven vessel operating in narrow channels or fairways on the Great Lakes, Western Rivers, or waters specified by the Secretary, and proceeding downbound with a following current shall have the right-of-way over an upbound vessel, shall pro pose the manner and place of passage, and shall initiate the maneuvering signals prescribed by Rule 34(a)(i), as appropriate. The vessel proceeding upbound against the current shall hold as necessary to permit safe passing.
(b) A vessel of less than 20 meters in length or a sailing vessel shall not impede the passage of a vessel that can safely navigate only within a narrow channel or fairway.
(c) A vessel engaged in fishing shall not impede the passage of any other vessel navigating within a narrow channel or fairway.
(d) A vessel shall not cross a narrow channel or fairway if such crossing impedes the passage of a vessel which can safely navigate only within that channel or fairway. The latter vessel shall use the danger signal prescribed in Rule 34(d) if in doubt as to the intention of the crossing vessel.
(e) (i) In a narrow channel or fairway when overtaking, the power- driven vessel intending to overtake another power-driven vessel shall indicate her intention by sounding the appropriate signal prescribed in Rule 34(c) and take steps to permit safe passing. The power-driven vessel being overtaken, if in agree ment, shall sound the same signal and may, if specifically agreed to take steps to permit safe passing. If in doubt she shall sound the danger signal prescribed in Rule 34(d).
(ii) This Rule does not relieve the overtaking vessel of her oblig ation under Rule 13.
(f) A vessel nearing a bend or an area of a narrow channel or fair way where other vessels may be obscured by an intervening obstruc tion shall navigate with particular alertness and caution and shall sound the appropriate signal prescribed in Rule 34(e).
(g) Every vessel shall, if the circumstances of the case admit, avoid anchoring in a narrow channel.
21


—INLAND—
Sound and Light Signals
RULE 34
Maneuvering and Warning Signals
(a) When power-driven vessels are in sight of one another and meeting or crossing at a distance within half a mile of each other, each vessel underway, when maneuvering as authorized or required by these Rules:
(i) shall indicate that maneuver by the following signals on her whistle: one short blast to mean “I intend to leave you on my port side”; two shtht blasts to mean “1 intend to leave you on my starboard side”; and three short blasts to mean “I am operating astern propulsion”.
(ii) upon hearing the one or two blast signal of the other shall, if in agreement, sound the same whistle signal and take the steps necessary to effect a safe passing. If, however, from any cause, the vessel doubts the safety of the proposed maneuver, she shall sound the danger signal specified in paragraph (d) of this Rule and each vessel shall take appropriate precautionary action until a safe passing agreement is made.
(b) A vessel may supplement the whistle signals prescribed in para graph (a) of this Rule by light signals:
(i) These signals shall have the following significance: one flash to mean “I intend to leave you on my port side”; two flashes to mean “I intend to leave you on my starboard side”; three flash es to mean “I am operating astern propulsion”;
(ii) The duration of each flash shall be about 1 second; and
(iii) The light used for this signal shall, if fitted, be one all-round white or yellow light, visible at a minimum range of 2 miles, syn chronized with the whistle, and shall comply with the provisions of Annex I to these Rules.
117

—INLAND
Sound and Light Signals
RULE 34—CONTINUED
(c) When in sight of one another:
(i) a power-driven vessel intending to overtake another power- driven vessel shall indicate her intention by the following signals on her whistle: one short blast to mean “I intend to overtake you on your starboard side”; two short blasts to mean “I intend to overtake you on your port side”; and
(ii) the power-driven vessel about to be overtaken shall, if in agreement, sound a similar sound signal. If in doubt she shall sound the danger signal prescribed in paragraph (d).
(d) When vessels in sight of one another are approaching each other and from any cause either vessel fails to understand the inten tions or actions of the other, or is in doubt whether sufficient action is being taken by the other to avoid collision, the vessel in doubt shall immediately indicate such doubt by giving at least five short and rapid blasts on the whistle. This signal may be supplemented by a light signal of at least five short and rapid flashes.
(e) A vessel nearing a bend or an area of a channel or fairway where other vessels may be obscured by an intervening obstruction shall sound one prolonged blast. This signal shall be answered with a prolonged blast by any approaching vessel that may be within hearing around the bend or behind the intervening obstruction.
(f) If whistles are fitted on a vessel at a distance apart of more than 100 meters, one whistle only shall be used for giving maneuvering and warning signals.
(g) When a power-driven vessel is leaving a dock or berth, she shall sound one prolonged blast.
(h) A vessel that reaches agreement with another vessel in a head on, crossing, or overtaking situation, as for example, by using the radiotelephone as prescribed by the Vessel Bridge-to-Bridge Radiotelephone Act (85 Stat. 164; 33 U.S.C. 1201 et seq.), is not obliged to sound the whistle signals prescribed by this Rule, but may do so. If agreement is not reached, then whistle signals shall be exchanged in a timely manner and shall prevail.
119

This is Federal regulations for inland waters in the Western regains, rivers and lakes. I found out that the Local Sheriffs Dept. can not enforce these laws but BLM can and if the rules are not followed and something happens the law will be enforced. :|err:|err:|err

If we all do this while in the Gorge there will be so many horns and whistles sounding, no one will know what to do. And as my friend Kenny said we will all get flipped off a lot. So just be as safe as you can.
you expect the masses to read this and follow these rules.:)sphss:D i knew of a few of them a couple of them were a suprise. a lot of those rules are broken 1 millions times a day by lake lice.
 

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(i) a power-driven vessel intending to overtake another power- driven vessel shall indicate her intention by the following signals on her whistle: one short blast to mean “I intend to overtake you on your starboard side”; two short blasts to mean “I intend to overtake you on your port side”;

If these were followed there sure would be alot of horns sounding
 

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Premium Member
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
WHlaser 23 = Please give me the full definition of Lake Lice.
 

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Premium Member
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771 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
you expect the masses to read this and follow these rules.:)sphss:D i knew of a few of them a couple of them were a suprise. a lot of those rules are broken 1 millions times a day by lake lice.
Thanks for Definition. I don't expect anything. I'm just showing whats on the book that they expect us to do.
 

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Banne'd
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2,426 Posts
If these were followed there sure would be alot of horns sounding[/QUOTE]



No shit, and a bunch of flipping off. Might as well ask if he has any Grey Poupon while your at it.

But no horn is required on the az water ways acording to the AZGF web site. The boat being over taken must hold it's course.
 

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Premium Member
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771 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
If these were followed there sure would be alot of horns sounding


No shit, and a bunch of flipping off. Might as well ask if he has any Grey Poupon while your at it.

But no horn is required on the az water ways acording to the AZGF web site. The boat being over taken must hold it's course.[/QUOTE]


I talked to the local SD in Havasu and he said that the AZFG Regs are the rules that the local SD enforces. But he said Lake Havasu is a Federal water way and is under Federal laws that can be enforced by a Federal agency, like BLM, Coast Guard. And if Federal law is violated and there is a problem , IE accident, injurys or lawsuits, they will be enforced to the full extent of the law. So there covering there, you know what ,in every way they can.
 

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Member In Training
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In layman's, stay to the right.
pretty much it in a nutshell right there, yet 50% at best can even figure out and adhere to this simple directive..... :|err
 

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Don't Taze Me, Bro!
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1,812 Posts
One note. When they refer to "Western Rivers", they are referring to the Mississippi River and its tributaries and a few other rivers in that region that have a lot of push barges and tow boats.

It does NOT include the Colorado River, which is governed by straight Inland Navigation Rules.

Arizona LE can only enforce (write tickets) for violations of Arizona Law regarding Navigation. However in determining fault in a collision or other incident, ALL applicable laws, regulations and rules come into play.

When there is a conflict in the rules, Federal Navigation Rules take precedent. There is a provision in AZ law that states "B. Regulations established under this section shall not be in conflict with those prescribed by the United States coast guard. "

One area that is in conflict is the AZ law that says that a vessel being overtaken must maintain course and speed.

Under Federal Navigation Rules, an overtaking vessel must stay out of the way of the overtaken vessel under any and all circumstances, and is responsible for any collision that occurs. The exact wording of the rule is:

(a) Notwithstanding anything contained in the Rules, any vessel overtaking any other shall keep out of the way of the vessel being overtaken.

(b) A vessel shall be deemed to be overtaking when coming up with a another vessel from a direction more than 22.5 degrees abaft her beam, that is, in such a position with reference to the vessel she is overtaking, that at night she would be able to see only the sternlight of that vessel but neither of her sidelights.

(c) When a vessel is in any doubt as to whether she is overtaking another, she shall assume that this is the case and act accordingly.

(d) Any subsequent alteration of the bearing between the two vessels shall not make the overtaking vessel a crossing vessel within the meaning of these Rules or relieve her of the duty of keeping clear of the overtaken vessel until she is finally past and clear.

I bolded paragraph (d), as this is where the conflict is.

While it may be stupid and suicidal for the PWC to turn in front of you while are blazing past him, under the Rules he is within his right to do so, and the boat that is overtaking him (going faster) is at fault for the collision.

Keep this in mind when you're out there. If you are over taking ANYTHING out there, be prepared for anything and everything to happen. When you are the overtaking vessel, any collision IS YOUR FAULT.
 

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Gas Dock Greg
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352 Posts
One note. When they refer to "Western Rivers", they are referring to the Mississippi River and its tributaries and a few other rivers in that region that have a lot of push barges and tow boats.

It does NOT include the Colorado River, which is governed by straight Inland Navigation Rules.

Arizona LE can only enforce (write tickets) for violations of Arizona Law regarding Navigation. However in determining fault in a collision or other incident, ALL applicable laws, regulations and rules come into play.

When there is a conflict in the rules, Federal Navigation Rules take precedent. There is a provision in AZ law that states "B. Regulations established under this section shall not be in conflict with those prescribed by the United States coast guard. "

One area that is in conflict is the AZ law that says that a vessel being overtaken must maintain course and speed.

Under Federal Navigation Rules, an overtaking vessel must stay out of the way of the overtaken vessel under any and all circumstances, and is responsible for any collision that occurs. The exact wording of the rule is:

(a) Notwithstanding anything contained in the Rules, any vessel overtaking any other shall keep out of the way of the vessel being overtaken.

(b) A vessel shall be deemed to be overtaking when coming up with a another vessel from a direction more than 22.5 degrees abaft her beam, that is, in such a position with reference to the vessel she is overtaking, that at night she would be able to see only the sternlight of that vessel but neither of her sidelights.

(c) When a vessel is in any doubt as to whether she is overtaking another, she shall assume that this is the case and act accordingly.

(d) Any subsequent alteration of the bearing between the two vessels shall not make the overtaking vessel a crossing vessel within the meaning of these Rules or relieve her of the duty of keeping clear of the overtaken vessel until she is finally past and clear.

I bolded paragraph (d), as this is where the conflict is.

While it may be stupid and suicidal for the PWC to turn in front of you while are blazing past him, under the Rules he is within his right to do so, and the boat that is overtaking him (going faster) is at fault for the collision.

Keep this in mind when you're out there. If you are over taking ANYTHING out there, be prepared for anything and everything to happen. When you are the overtaking vessel, any collision IS YOUR FAULT.
Hence loud pipes, make eye contact before you pass.:)hand
 

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Boat Test GURU
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450 Posts
DJohn A few years ago Bob Hansen and I spent the day taking the AZ boating class. Yes BOATCOP was one of the instructors. I will say as you did I learned a bunch of thing I did not know.
I CAN ONLY RECOMMEND EVERY BOATER TAKE A BOATING CLASS. I KNOW EGOS GET IN THE WAY BUT MAYBE JUST MAYBE IT MIGHT HELP SAVE SOMEONES LIFE.

I’M SURE IF WE ASK BOATCOP HE WILL POST THE AZ CLASS TIMES.

AND YES DJOHN I DID PASS THE CLASS.

JW
 

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6,017 Posts
DJohn A few years ago Bob Hansen and I spent the day taking the AZ boating class. Yes BOATCOP was one of the instructors. I will say as you did I learned a bunch of thing I did not know.
I CAN ONLY RECOMMEND EVERY BOATER TAKE A BOATING CLASS. I KNOW EGOS GET IN THE WAY BUT MAYBE JUST MAYBE IT MIGHT HELP SAVE SOMEONES LIFE.

I’M SURE IF WE ASK BOATCOP HE WILL POST THE AZ CLASS TIMES.

AND YES DJOHN I DID PASS THE CLASS.

JW
What about the driving test... :D
 

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Premium Member
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771 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
One note. When they refer to "Western Rivers", they are referring to the Mississippi River and its tributaries and a few other rivers in that region that have a lot of push barges and tow boats.

It does NOT include the Colorado River, which is governed by straight Inland Navigation Rules.

Arizona LE can only enforce (write tickets) for violations of Arizona Law regarding Navigation. However in determining fault in a collision or other incident, ALL applicable laws, regulations and rules come into play.

When there is a conflict in the rules, Federal Navigation Rules take precedent. There is a provision in AZ law that states "B. Regulations established under this section shall not be in conflict with those prescribed by the United States coast guard. "

One area that is in conflict is the AZ law that says that a vessel being overtaken must maintain course and speed.

Under Federal Navigation Rules, an overtaking vessel must stay out of the way of the overtaken vessel under any and all circumstances, and is responsible for any collision that occurs. The exact wording of the rule is:

(a) Notwithstanding anything contained in the Rules, any vessel overtaking any other shall keep out of the way of the vessel being overtaken.

(b) A vessel shall be deemed to be overtaking when coming up with a another vessel from a direction more than 22.5 degrees abaft her beam, that is, in such a position with reference to the vessel she is overtaking, that at night she would be able to see only the sternlight of that vessel but neither of her sidelights.

(c) When a vessel is in any doubt as to whether she is overtaking another, she shall assume that this is the case and act accordingly.

(d) Any subsequent alteration of the bearing between the two vessels shall not make the overtaking vessel a crossing vessel within the meaning of these Rules or relieve her of the duty of keeping clear of the overtaken vessel until she is finally past and clear.

I bolded paragraph (d), as this is where the conflict is.

While it may be stupid and suicidal for the PWC to turn in front of you while are blazing past him, under the Rules he is within his right to do so, and the boat that is overtaking him (going faster) is at fault for the collision.

Keep this in mind when you're out there. If you are over taking ANYTHING out there, be prepared for anything and everything to happen. When you are the overtaking vessel, any collision IS YOUR FAULT.
I knew you two would jump in here at some point and glad you did.

JW, with our trip coming up this week end, up the gorge, I have my concerns and thought I would brush up on my safety rules. I was supprised to find out how much I don't know.

You know, having you my whole family and some friends going on this trip and you driving in all. :)

And yes, BoatCop please post classes.
 

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(i) a power-driven vessel intending to overtake another power- driven vessel shall indicate her intention by the following signals on her whistle: one short blast to mean “I intend to overtake you on your starboard side”; two short blasts to mean “I intend to overtake you on your port side”;

If these were followed there sure would be alot of horns sounding
But what if the vessel you are overtaking is set on kill? Or if there are reeds present? :D
 
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