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I recently picked up a mini day cruiser project hull and am going to have to paint the hull. It came with the silk screen wood panels that were cleared over, i would like for these to go back in when i repaint it. Anyone ever replaced these before?
 

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I recently picked up a mini day cruiser project hull and am going to have to paint the hull. It came with the silk screen wood panels that were cleared over, i would like for these to go back in when i repaint it. Anyone ever replaced these before?
The wood look in your boat was achieved by first taping off the mold and leaving exposed the area you wanted the wood to show. Then the mold was cleared with clear gel (duh). Then the wood grained cloth was layed over the clear gel and the bubbles wiped away, the stuff is wafer thin. Then the color of choice, depending on which wood you were trying to duplicate, cherry, walnut and so on, would be sprayed over the paper. the tape was pulled and you continued to spray the other colors in the mold. Back every thing up with black gel and begin to glass.

The wood grained cloth (I can't remember what the hell it's called) came in several types, the better ones were damn near impossible to see the woven pattern, cheap stuff looked like a table cloth up close.
My buddy in Orange County still sells the stuff but now you have to work in reverse to get it to look right. If you want I can get you in touch with him.
 

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Old rigger got it right. the original was done in the mold. If the clear only is messed up you might be able to color sand the clear and redo the clear if it's into the wood scrim you can't save it. Old school faux wood painting with a clear coat over it might be the only way. Antique car restoration painters know how to do it as alot of cars back in the 30's had painted "wood" dash panels. One painter I know who could do it but is $$$ is Tom Kelley. Can replicate any type of wood you want.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Old rigger got it right. the original was done in the mold. If the clear only is messed up you might be able to color sand the clear and redo the clear if it's into the wood scrim you can't save it. Old school faux wood painting with a clear coat over it might be the only way. Antique car restoration painters know how to do it as alot of cars back in the 30's had painted "wood" dash panels. One painter I know who could do it but is $$$ is Tom Kelley. Can replicate any type of wood you want.
The clear has bubbled up in a few places and the cloth has lost its color, but if the color is shot over the cloth maybe i can salvage whats there being is the cloth is not ripped or damaged
 

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The only thing you can do to the existing deck is lightly sand the clear, don't go through to the cloth below (the clear has burnt away after 35+ years so it's super thin now), and kiss it off with a buffer.

Like I said, you can still buy the wood grained cloth and repair it in reverse. There's no reason to have a painter do a wood grain paint job, unless that's what you want to do. It's just a matter of removing the old material and starting over.
 

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The only thing you can do to the existing deck is lightly sand the clear, don't go through to the cloth below (the clear has burnt away after 35+ years so it's super thin now), and kiss it off with a buffer.

Like I said, you can still buy the wood grained cloth and repair it in reverse. There's no reason to have a painter do a wood grain paint job, unless that's what you want to do. It's just a matter of removing the old material and starting over.
This sounds like the most logical way to go, thanks for the info! Would you mind pm'ing me the contact info to you buddy in Orange County
Thanks!
 
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