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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
While looking at my trailer after a long trip, i noticed the wear pattern on the left tire to be only the "outside" tread on the tire...??? The rest of the tire had normal wear but the outside tread was worn way more than the rest, AND it was only about 12-18" long(if you were to put a tape measure on it.) When I look at the trailer from behind, it looks like the wheel is cambered or the top is leaning out. Is my spindle bent or do I have a bigger problem?? I know an internet diagnosis is not exact, but I'm looking for somewhere to start before I take the trailer to the shop..
 

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You who rock I salute you
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Inflation is often an overlooked issue that causes all kinds of problems.

New style axels are reaching the market now that slightly "track" causing less stress on the tires too.

I had a similar problem once and solved it by over inflating that tire by 7 psi.
Helped alot.

Jus' my 2 cents worth.
 

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Lord of the Drinks
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Say it aint so! That was another thought of mine...hmm
Since there's no alignment on trailers, an axle is the first place I'd look. Axles are not really that expensive. Bent hangers, etc are tougher to repair. How does the other side look?

Axles are sometimes tough to eye with the tires on, so maybe crawl under there throw a straight edge on it? Maybe look for an impact while you're down there?

Like TPC said, you may also want to make sure all the tires are aired up and equal.
 

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"Try it Now!"
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Swap the tires around a little bit and see if the new tire on that one hub suffers the same fate. I had a set of mud tires on my truck that the inside of one wore out, the outside of the other..etc..ended up being POS tires. I hope that's all your problem is and not something more serious...especially with the weird pattern you're getting.
 

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This sounds like a bent spindle, I experienced the same situation several years ago. Spindles can be bent very easily from hitting something in the road or running over a curb etc. Most spindles are welded to the axel and require replacing the axel as there is no cheep way to put the spindle back to its original position. Fortunately axels are relatively cheep to replace @ $200.00 as I recall. Take it to a competent trailer repair shop for diagnosis.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
On one side the tire sticks out past the fender and on the other side the tire doesn't. I have a ton of miles logged on the 5 and 210 freeways between OC and Castaic, and the pot holes on the 5 are borderline criminal. I have always use Goodyear marathons on the trailer, and have had a bubbling issue on the side wall in the past. I usually dont put cheap tires on the trailer...pay now or pay later...
 

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The HMFIC
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may be you can loosen all the ubolts that hold the springs to the axle on both sides and recenter your axle. im sure you have more weight on one tire than the other causeing the crappy wear. just a thought....
 

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ytosemitesam
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Oh yes there is ----- Alignment of trailers

Since there's no alignment on trailers, an axle is the first place I'd look. Axles are not really that expensive. Bent hangers, etc are tougher to repair. How does the other side look?

Axles are sometimes tough to eye with the tires on, so maybe crawl under there throw a straight edge on it? Maybe look for an impact while you're down there?

Like TPC said, you may also want to make sure all the tires are aired up and equal.
I know other people will chime in , but do get the trailer axle - axles aligned, any good alignment shop will get er done, If you go to one and they have a blank look, move on till you to one that says can do. I have had a number of trailers aligned and no more unusual wear. Yes the axles get bent or sag and are easy to align
 

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Break Out Another Thousnd
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In addition to possible axle/spindle issues, I would wonder if you did not have a tire failure of some sort - due to the fact that it is not wearing symetrically around the tire. (ie. broken belt, bubble, seperation, etc).
 

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Take it to a trailer shop that dose alignments and have them check it. If the out side of your tire is wearing that axle is either cambered out or toed in to much on that one side. If and when you get it aligned after it will tow like a dream and tires should wear evenly across.
 

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Lord of the Drinks
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Take it to a trailer shop that dose alignments and have them check it. If the out side of your tire is wearing that axle is either cambered out or toed in to much on that one side. If and when you get it aligned after it will tow like a dream and tires should wear evenly across.
Just curious- how do you set camber or toe-in on a solid axle?
 

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#245 ITT
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Just curious- how do you set camber or toe-in on a solid axle?
I worked at an axle manufacturer for a while (about 2 years ago) and learned a lot about how they are made. I'm on my 3rd set of tires on my trailer for exactly the same thing everyone is describing, so I asked one of my production people about it. He said that axles are usually made with positive camber so that when the trailer is loaded to it's max capacity, the tires will still be riding at (hopefully) neutral camber. My guys in the shop used to either bend an axle to get that positive camber, or they would weld the spindles on at an angle to achieve the same result.

You can't easily set either camber or toe-in on a solid axle. Cutting off the spindles, re-machining them and re-welding them is the only way.
 

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Lord of the Drinks
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You can't easily set either camber or toe-in on a solid axle. Cutting off the spindles, re-machining them and re-welding them is the only way.
Since there is no way to shim or adjust them with indexed bolts, welding and machining is nearly impossible to get right because the work is done with the weight of the boat off the trailer.

You can adjust the track of the axle as it allows some adjustment side-to-side as it mounts to the leaf spring, but camber and toe-in is another story.

If you hit a pothole or bottom the axle out and bend it, it will also tend to heat the tire up as it scrubs going in a straight line.

My trailer tires have never worn evenly on any boat I've owned. Triple axles are even worse as you scrub and twist the tires in tight turns.
 

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#245 ITT
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Since there is no way to shim or adjust them with indexed bolts, welding and machining is nearly impossible to get right because the work is done with the weight of the boat off the trailer.
Before welding spindles in place, my welders used fixtures that aligned them with the axle, they could set camber, toe in or out using interchangeable collars.

I asked the owner of the company about the curve of the axles and he said it was an industry standard - spindles welded with positive camber where an end-user (trailer manufacturer) decision.
 

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Lord of the Drinks
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Before welding spindles in place, my welders used fixtures that aligned them with the axle, they could set camber, toe in or out using interchangeable collars.

I asked the owner of the company about the curve of the axles and he said it was an industry standard - spindles welded with positive camber where an end-user (trailer manufacturer) decision.
I understand what you are saying, but building positive camber and/or toe-in into axles is not the same as aligning.

To truely "align" a trailer with camber and toe-in, it would need to be done with the boat on the trailer, which is just not practical.

You would have to throw it on an alignment rack, take some measurements, take the weight off the axle, cut the welds, "best guess" where the new welds will need to go, re-weld it, and put the boat back on. Check the alignment, and if you are off a little, start over again.

If your trailler is made from a template for your boat from the manufacturer, to your point, the camber is going to be pretty close from the factory (depending on the weight of the loaded boat). If the camber is significantly off one or more wheels, or the tires are not tracking straight, you probably hit something that most-likely bent some of these (non-adjustable) parts.

The only real adjustment is where the axle bolts to the leafspring. IMO, if you hit something hard enough to move that, you would be lucky not to have damaged anything else.
 

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ytosemitesam
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Dahhhh

Just curious- how do you set camber or toe-in on a solid axle?
That is why they have those big pliers - to bend the axle to put the spindles spec's,LOL.
It really is simple with stops and big hyd. jacks. My shop always does it with the boat and all the stuff in it - on the trailer, that way you are not guessing. No diff. then a solid axle car or truck, oh maybe you young guys did not have those. :D
 

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B1 Racing
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I have a similar issue with my competitive trailer, its either a bent axle or spindle, not surprised with the places I have tow through.. Call your trailer manufacturer and get a new one and be done with it.
 
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